Juvenile Nonfiction

A Poke in the I

Author: Paul B. Janeczko

Publisher: Candlewick Press

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 35

View: 774

Offers a collection of poetry for young readers from numerous visual poets, including Maureen W. Armour and John Hollander.
Poetry

A POKE IN MY EYE

Author: ERIC AMOAKO EDMONDS

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 304

View: 225

All of life's journeys are filled with many dismal moments. For some of us, the point where pain and disappointment coexist pushes us to our wits end. Finding a compelling reason to live a fulfilling life can only start with a radical paradigm shift in our thinking. For this reason, I am always conscious of telling my story in a genre-blending style and a deeply memoiristic work, yet as a poignant account of how the choice of perspectives can illuminate the unnerving portrait of the life we live. A Poke in My Eye is a challenging and uplifting brainchild of some of the internal dialogues we all have with ourselves when we are alone, when we are afraid, and when our lives appear to be headed for a tailspin. Where do we find a place to start over? Where do we find the willpower to believe in ourselves again? How do we find a reason to live again? This is about hope. It is a careful juxtaposition of a range of candid conversations, personal reflections, poetry, genuine inspirations and simple life-changing ideas from which all of us can draw practical tools for living a rewarding life regardless of our unique circumstances. A Poke in My Eye reminds us all to embrace even the most bizarre adversities, confront our fears head on and find the strength from within to live our best in every moment. Only you and I can make the moments of our lives count, and the intriguing ideas in this book are my stories.
Education

Writing Sense

Author: Juli Kendall

Publisher: Stenhouse Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 214

View: 839

Writing is all about making meaning. The prospect of teaching writing to a classroom full of students—some who speak English and some who don't, can be overwhelming. When students learning English are at different levels, the task is even more challenging. Juli Kendall and Outey Khuon experimented with Ellin Keene's “Thinking Strategies Used by Proficient Learners” and found that by integrating writing and reading instruction their English language learners become stronger writers. Writing Sense outlines the classroom conditions necessary for successful writing instruction with English language learners, whether in writing workshop and/or small-group instruction. It includes 68 classroom-tested lessons for grades K–8 that show kids at all levels of language acquisition how to make connections, ask questions, visualize (make mental images), infer, determine importance, synthesize, monitor meaning and comprehension, and use fix-up strategies. Like the authors' earlier book, Making Sense, the five main sections are geared to the stages of language proficiency, and lessons are divided into “younger” and “older” students, spanning kindergarten through to grade eight. There are extensive lists of suggested books for mentor texts as well as lists of mentor authors to facilitate teachers' planning and instruction.
Fiction

The Grub-and-Stakers Pinch a Poke

Author: Charlotte MacLeod

Publisher: BASTEI LÜBBE

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 197

View: 621

An amateur play turns serious when a prop gun is swapped for a real one. When Jenson Thorbisher-Freep announces an amateur theatrical contest, the women in the Grub-and-Stake gardening club race to join in. They enlist Osbert Monk as their playwright - not only is he married to their club leader Dittany Monk, but he's famous the world over as Lex Laramie, bestselling novelist of Westerns. Taking the legend of Dangerous Dan McGrew as his inspiration, Osbert delivers a rough draft faster than the Pony Express. Now all the Grub-and-Stakers have to do is cast it. To play McGrew, Dittany picks town cad Andrew McNaster, who has recently improved his manners in an attempt to woo Osbert's aunt, Arethusa. The gunslinger's performance gets a bit too real on opening night, though, when his prop bullets are replaced with real ones, and claim the toe of a fellow thespian. Is McNaster as nice as he pretends to be? Or has he taken his part too close to heart, and decided to become very dangerous indeed? Review Quote. "The screwball mystery is Charlotte MacLeod's cup of tea." - Chicago Tribune. "Charlotte MacLeod does what she does better than anybody else does it; and what she does is in the top rank of modern mystery fiction." - Elizabeth Peters, creator of the Amelia Peabody. series "The epitome of the 'cozy' mystery." - Mostly Murder. Biographical note. Charlotte MacLeod (1922-2005) was an internationally bestselling author of cozy mysteries. Born in Canada, she moved to Boston as a child, and lived in New England most of her life. After graduating from college, she made a career in advertising, writing copy for the Stop & Shop Supermarket Company before moving on to Boston firm N. H. Miller & Co., where she rose to the rank of vice president. In her spare time, MacLeod wrote short stories, and in 1964 published her first novel, a children's book called "Mystery of the White Knight." In "Rest You Merry" (1978), MacLeod introduced Professor Peter Shandy, a horticulturist and amateur sleuth whose adventures she would chronicle for two decades. "The Family Vault" (1979) marked the first appearance of her other best-known characters: the husband and wife sleuthing team Sarah Kelling and Max Bittersohn, whom she followed until her last novel, "The Balloon Man," in 1998.
Education

Integrating Art and Language Arts Through Children's Literature

Author: Debi Englebaugh

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 211

View: 397

Connecting art and language arts, this guide offers creative lessons for more than 140 favorite children's books, most of which have been published within the last 10 years. The lessons help teachers inspire young students to create art projects related to a book's story. In the first part of the book, the author explains more than 50 art techniques that can be used with almost any book, including batik, collage, decoupage, paste paper, and sponge painting. The second part of the book provides teachers with a wealth of illustrated lessons. Each lesson includes the book's title, the art project, a brief description of the story as it relates to the art project, supplies, instructions, bibliographic information, and a list of relevant Web sites. Children's Books include: - Araminta's Paint Box - Arthur's Pet Business - Birdsong - Charlotte's Web - Dear Peter Rabbit - Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - Milo and the Magical Stones - Rechenka's Eggs - Where the Sidewalk Ends
Fiction

a: A Novel

Author: Andy Warhol

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 173

Conceptually unique, hilarious and frightening, referred to as “pornography” in The New York Times Book Review’s original review and as a “work of genius” in Newsweek’s, a: A Novel is the perfect literary manifestation of Andy Warhol’s sensibility. In the late sixties Warhol set out to turn a trade book into a piece of pop art, and the result was this astonishing account of the famously influential group of artists, superstars, addicts and freaks who made up the Factory milieu. Created from audiotapes recorded in and around the Factory, a: A Novel begins with the fabulous Ondine popping several amphetamines and then follows its characters as they converse with inspired, speed-driven wit and cut swaths through the clubs, coffee shops, hospitals, and whorehouses of 1960’s Manhattan.
Humor

The Very Best of The Secret Policeman's Ball

Author: Amnesty International

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 464

View: 448

Back in the day, if you wanted to raise money you stood on street corner with a tin and a smile. That is until Mr John Cleese rounded up a few friends in 1976 for Amnesty International's first fundraising show, 'A Poke In The Eye (With A Sharp Stick)'. Since then, Amnesty has produced a dozen Secret Policeman shows, which culminated this year with a breath-taking line-up at New York's Radio City Hall. This beautifully designed anniversary anthology brings together the greatest acts from the twelve shows: scripts of the Dead Parrot Sketch; lyrics to Michael Palin's 'I'm a Lumberjack'; Peter Cook's peerless E.L. Wisty monologues; Rowan Atkinson's school-master's roll-call and on through to the latest generation led by Eddie Izzard, Dylan Moran, Frank Skinner, Alan Carr and Russell Brand. These celebrated comedy routines are accompanied by beautiful photography, specially commissioned introductions and insightful interviews from the stars involved. It is a fitting tribute to a remarkable comedy institution.
Social Science

The Culture-Bound Syndromes

Author: Ronald C. Simons

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 518

View: 252

In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry. In a review of the literature on culture-bound syndromes up to 1969 Yap made certain suggestions for organizing thinking about them which for the most part have not received general acceptance (see Carr, this volume, p. 199). Through the seventies new descriptive and conceptual work was scarce, but in the last few years books and papers discussing the field were authored or edited by Tseng and McDermott (1981), AI-Issa (1982), Friedman and Faguet (1982) and Murphy (1982). In 1983 Favazza summarized his understanding of the state of current thinking for the fourth edition of the Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, and a symposium on culture-bound syndromes was organized by Kenny for the Eighth International Congress of Anthropology and Ethnology. The strong est impression to emerge from all this recent work is that there is no substantive consensus, and that the very concept, "culture-bound syndrome" could well use some serious reconsideration. As the role of culture-specific beliefs and prac tices in all affliction has come to be increasingly recognized it has become less and less clear what sets the culture-bound syndromes apart.