History

After Empire

Author: Sharon D. Welch

Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 204

A creative meditation on politics, engagement, and spirituality, Welch's latest work connects the personal to the political and the ethical to the historical stream in which we all live. At a time when many progressives feel disoriented and powerless, trapped in a narrative of unbridled assertion of U.S. power, Welch looks into the positive side of the American story, the struggles of peoples to act in concert for inclusive democracy, and hard-earned insights into civic and religious life. She finds the elements of a deep, vital, and hopeful spirituality there. Through chapters on virtuosity, ceremony, audacity, laughter, and risk, she recasts the shape and rationale of personal and political engagement with insights from Native American philosophy, social-contract theory, engaged Buddhism, and the new interreligious commitment to peace. For those who seek a way to affirm and embody a positive ethic in a time of conflict, war, and division, Welch offers this workbook for new human community.
Art

Jacques-Louis David

Author: Philippe Bordes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 379

View: 530

Catalog of an exhibition organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, held in Williamstown, Mass., June 5-Sept. 5, 2004.
History

After Empire

Author: Peter Zarrow

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 183

From 1885–1924, China underwent a period of acute political struggle and cultural change, brought on by a radical change in thought: after over 2,000 years of monarchical rule, the Chinese people stopped believing in the emperor. These forty years saw the collapse of Confucian political orthodoxy and the struggle among competing definitions of modern citizenship and the state. What made it possible to suddenly imagine a world without the emperor? After Empire traces the formation of the modern Chinese idea of the state through the radical reform programs of the late Qing (1885–1911), the Revolution of 1911, and the first years of the Republic through the final expulsion of the last emperor of the Qing from the Forbidden City in 1924. It contributes to longstanding debates on modern Chinese nationalism by highlighting the evolving ideas of major political thinkers and the views reflected in the general political culture. Zarrow uses a wide range of sources to show how "statism" became a hegemonic discourse that continues to shape China today. Essential to this process were the notions of citizenship and sovereignty, which were consciously adopted and modified from Western discourses on legal theory and international state practices on the basis of Chinese needs and understandings. This text provides fresh interpretations and keen insights into China's pivotal transition from dynasty to republic.
Art

Art and the Empire City

Author: Catherine Hoover Voorsanger

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 636

View: 583

Presented in conjunction with the September 2000 exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum, this volume presents the complex story of the proliferation of the arts in New York and the evolution of an increasingly discerning audience for those arts during the antebellum period. Thirteen essays by noted specialists bring new research and insights to bear on a broad range of subjects that offer both historical and cultural contexts and explore the city's development as a nexus for the marketing and display of art, as well as private collecting; landscape painting viewed against the background of tourism; new departures in sculpture, architecture, and printmaking; the birth of photography; New York as a fashion center; shopping for home decorations; changing styles in furniture; and the evolution of the ceramics, glass, and silver industries. The 300-plus works in the exhibition and comparative material are extensively illustrated in color and bandw. Oversize: 9.25x12.25". Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR
History

Making a World after Empire

Author: Christopher J. Lee

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 805

In April 1955, twenty-nine countries from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East came together for a diplomatic conference in Bandung, Indonesia, intending to define the direction of the postcolonial world. Representing approximately two-thirds of the world’s population, the Bandung conference occurred during a key moment of transition in the mid-twentieth century—amid the global wave of decolonization that took place after the Second World War and the nascent establishment of a new cold war world order in its wake. Participants such as Jawaharlal Nehru of India, Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt, Zhou Enlai of China, and Ahmed Sukarno of Indonesia seized this occasion to attempt the creation of a political alternative to the dual threats of Western neocolonialism and the cold war interventionism of the United States and the Soviet Union. The essays in this volume explore the diverse repercussions of this event, tracing the diplomatic, intellectual, and sociocultural histories that have emanated from it. Making a World after Empire consequently addresses the complex intersection of postcolonial history and cold war history and speaks to contemporary discussions of Afro-Asianism, empire, and decolonization, thus reestablishing the conference's importance in twentieth-century global history. Contributors: Michael Adas, Laura Bier, James R. Brennan, G. Thomas Burgess, Antoinette Burton, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Julian Go, Christopher J. Lee, Jamie Monson, Jeremy Prestholdt, Denis M. Tull
Religion

The Art of Empire

Author: Lee M. Jefferson

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 756

In recent years, art historians such as Johannes Deckers (Picturing the Bible, 2009) have argued for a significant transition in fourth- and fifth-century images of Jesus following the conversion of Constantine. Broadly speaking, they perceive the image of a peaceful, benevolent shepherd transformed into a powerful, enthroned Jesus, mimicking and mirroring the dominance and authority of the emperor. The powers of church and state are thus conveniently synthesized in such a potent image. This deeply rooted position assumes that ante-pacem images of Jesus were uniformly humble while post-Constantinian images exuded the grandeur of power and glory. The Art of Empire contends that the art and imagery of Late Antiquity merits a more nuanced understanding of the context of the imperial period before and after Constantine. The chapters in this collection each treat an aspect of the relationship between early Christian art and the rituals, practices, or imagery of the Empire, and offer a new and fresh perspective on the development of Christian art in its imperial background.
History

Britain After Empire

Author: P. Preston

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 487

Through compelling analysis of popular culture, high culture and elite designs in the years following the end of the Second World War, this book explores how Britain and its people have come to terms with the loss of prestige stemming from the decline of the British Empire. The result is a volume that offers new ideas on what it is to be 'British'.
Art

Social History of Art, Volume 1

Author: Arnold Hauser

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 330

View: 935

First published in 1951 Arnold Hausers commanding work presents an account of the development and meaning of art from its origins in the Stone Age through to the Film Age. Exploring the interaction between art and society, Hauser effectively details social and historical movements and sketches the frameworks in which visual art is produced. This new edition provides an excellent introduction to the work of Arnold Hauser. In his general introduction to The Social History of Art, Jonathan Harris asseses the importance of the work for contemporary art history and visual culture. In addition, an introduction to each volume provides a synopsis of Hausers narrative and serves as a critical guide to the text, identifying major themes, trends and arguments.
Literary Criticism

Life Writing After Empire

Author: Astrid Rasch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 144

View: 940

A watershed moment of the twentieth century, the end of empire saw upheavals to global power structures and national identities. However, decolonisation profoundly affected individual subjectivities too. Life Writing After Empire examines how people around the globe have made sense of the post-imperial condition through the practice of life writing in its multifarious expressions, from auto/biography through travel writing to oral history and photography. Through interdisciplinary approaches that draw on literature and history alike, the contributors explore how we might approach these genres differently in order to understand how individual life writing reflects broader societal changes. From far-flung corners of the former British Empire, people have turned to life writing to manage painful or nostalgic memories, as well as to think about the past and future of the nation anew through the personal experience. In a range of innovative and insightful contributions, some of the foremost scholars of the field challenge the way we think about narrative, memory and identity after empire. This book was originally published as a special issue of Life Writing.
Art

The Social History of Art

Author: Arnold Hauser

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 274

View: 406

Presents an account of the development and meaning of art from its origins in the Stone Age through to the Film Age.
Art

History of Art

Author: Horst Woldemar Janson

Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 1031

View: 440

For forty years, this widely acclaimed classic has remained unsurpassed as an introduction to art in the Western world, boasting the matchless credibility of the Janson name. This newest update features a more contemporary, more colorful design and vast array of extraordinarily produced illustrations that have become the Janson hallmark. A narrative voice makes this book a truly enjoyable read, and carefully reviewed and revised updates to this edition offer the utmost clarity in contributions based on recent scholarship. Extensive captions for the book’s incredible art program offer profound insight through the eyes of twentieth-century art historians speaking about specific pieces of art featured throughout. Significantly changed in this edition is the chapter on “The Late Renaissance,” in which Janson offers a new perspective on the subject, tracing in detail the religious art tied to the Catholic Reform movement, whose early history is little known to many readers of art history. Janson has also rearranged early Renaissance art according to genres instead of time sequence, and he has followed the reinterpretation of Etruscan art begun in recent years by German and English art historians. With a truly humanist approach, this book gives written and visual meaning to the captivating story of what artists have tried to express—and why—for more than 30,000 years.
Art

Locating Renaissance Art

Author: Carol M. Richardson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 334

View: 412

Renaissance art history is traditionally identified with Italian centers of production, and Florence in particular. Instead, this book explores the dynamic interchange between European artistic centers and artists and the trade in works of art. It also considers the impact of differing locations on art and artists and some of the economic, political, and cultural factors crucial to the emergence of an artistic center. During c.1420-1520, no city or court could succeed in isolation and so artists operated within a network of interests and local and international identities. The case studies presented in this book portray the Renaissance as an exciting international phenomenon, with cities and courts inextricably bound together in a web of economic and political interests.
History

Art in the Roman Empire

Author: Michael Grant

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 488

Michael Grant has specially selected some of the most significant examples of painting, portraits, architecture, mosaic, jewellery and silverware, to give a unique insight into the functions and manifestations of art in the Roman Empire. Art in the Roman Empire shows how many of the most impressive masterpieces were produced outside Rome, on the frontiers of its enormous empire.
History

The Aztec Pantheon and the Art of Empire

Author: John M. D. Pohl

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 98

View: 396

"Exploring a defining moment of cultural encounter, this book offers points of departure for a comparative archaeology of empire. While many studies dwell on the Aztec gods and the bloody rituals performed in their horror, The Aztec Pantheon examines little-known episodes in which classicism mediated a dialogue both within and between Mesoamerica and Spain. The Spanish imagination of Rome and the memory of the Iberian Peninsula as a province of the Roman Empire were used to forge new understandings of Mexican society as well as to guide and critique Spain's imperial aims in the New World. The authors engage contemporary approaches to cross-cultural analogy, which sheds light on the function of monumental arts, religious spectacles, and consciously classicizing traditions within empires."--BOOK JACKET.
Art

Early Christian and Byzantine Art

Author: John Beckwith

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 553

View: 654

Focusing on mosaics, sculpture, paintings, jewelry, and silk, the author examines this artistic style as an expression of religious thought