Games

Atari to Zelda

Author: Mia Consalvo

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Games

Page: 272

View: 577

The cross-cultural interactions of Japanese videogames and the West, from DIY localization by fans to corporate strategies of "Japaneseness."
Computers

Retro Gaming

Author: Mike Diver

Publisher: LOM ART

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 192

View: 133

Take a trip down memory lane with Retro Gaming, and relive the glory days (and not so glory days) of your old favourites.Packed with all the characters, games, consoles and franchises that you used to love (and possibly still do), this is a compact, conversational compendium of all-time highs - alongside just a handful of humorous (in hindsight) lows - from over forty years of arcade, computer, console and handheld hits.From Atari's early arcade classics and home games consoles of the 1970s, through to classics that keep on giving, such as Halo and Tomb Raider, this book summarizes the significant releases, research and revolutions that have made video games a £100 billion (and rising) industry.Evergreen favourites from Nintendo, SEGA and Sony are present and correct - no collection would be complete without entries for Mario and Sonic, Tetris and Crash Bandicoot. But we also give credit to the less-celebrated but utterly vital titles, characters, controllers and systems that have helped the world of gaming expand and evolve.A guide, a companion and a window onto a joyous past, Retro Gaming is a perfect book to dip in and out of, as mood and your current gaming habits dictate.
Games & Activities

The A-Z of Atari 7800 Games: Volume 1

Author: Kieren Hawken

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN:

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 194

View: 916

The A-Z of Atari 7800 Games: Volume 1 features reviews of three different games for each letter of the alphabet. The games range from the very earliest releases in the 1984 to the modern homebrew games of today. This book shows you just how diverse the library of titles is for the Atari 7800 console and how it became one of the popular consoles to own and collect for.
Philosophy

The Legend of Zelda and Philosophy

Author: Luke Cuddy

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 865

With both young and adult gamers as loyal fans, The Legend of Zelda is one of the most beloved video game series ever created. The contributors to this volume consider the following questions and more: What is the nature of the gamer’s connection to Link? Does Link have a will, or do gamers project their wills onto him? How does the gamer experience the game? Do the rules of logic apply in the game world? How is space created and distributed in Hyrule (the fictional land in which the game takes place)? How does time function? Is Zelda art? Can Hyrule be seen as an ideal society? Can the game be enjoyable without winning? The Legend of Zelda and Philosophy not only appeals to Zelda fans and philosophers but also puts video games on the philosophical map as a serious area of study.
Games

Cheating

Author: Mia Consalvo

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Games

Page: 240

View: 108

The widely varying experiences of players of digital games challenge the notions that there is only one correct way to play a game. Some players routinely use cheat codes, consult strategy guides, or buy and sell in-game accounts, while others consider any or all of these practices off limits. Meanwhile, the game industry works to constrain certain readings or activities and promote certain ways of playing. In Cheating, Mia Consalvo investigates how players choose to play games, and what happens when they can't always play the way they'd like. She explores a broad range of player behavior, including cheating (alone and in groups), examines the varying ways that players and industry define cheating, describes how the game industry itself has helped systematize cheating, and studies online cheating in context in an online ethnography of Final Fantasy XI. She develops the concept of "gaming capital" as a key way to understand individuals' interaction with games, information about games, the game industry, and other players.Consalvo provides a cultural history of cheating in videogames, looking at how the packaging and selling of such cheat-enablers as cheat books, GameSharks, and mod chips created a cheat industry. She investigates how players themselves define cheating and how their playing choices can be understood, with particular attention to online cheating. Finally, she examines the growth of the peripheral game industries that produce information about games rather than actual games. Digital games are spaces for play and experimentation; the way we use and think about digital games, Consalvo argues, is crucially important and reflects ethical choices in gameplay and elsewhere.
Games & Activities

Real Games

Author: Mia Consalvo

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 224

View: 933

How we talk about games as real or not-real, and how that shapes what games are made and who is invited to play them. In videogame criticism, the worst insult might be “That's not a real game!” For example, “That's not a real game, it's on Facebook!” and “That's not a real game, it's a walking simulator!” But how do people judge what is a real game and what is not—what features establish a game's gameness? In this engaging book, Mia Consalvo and Christopher Paul examine the debates about the realness or not-realness of videogames and find that these discussions shape what games get made and who is invited to play them. Consalvo and Paul look at three main areas often viewed as determining a game's legitimacy: the game's pedigree (its developer), the content of the game itself, and the game's payment structure. They find, among other things, that even developers with a track record are viewed with suspicion if their games are on suspect platforms. They investigate game elements that are potentially troublesome for a game's gameness, including genres, visual aesthetics, platform, and perceived difficulty. And they explore payment models, particularly free-to-play—held by some to be a marker of illegitimacy. Finally, they examine the debate around such so-called walking simulators as Dear Esther and Gone Home. And finally, they consider what purpose is served by labeling certain games “real."
Computers

Quests

Author: Jeff Howard

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 230

View: 246

This unique take on quests, incorporating literary and digital theory, provides an excellent resource for game developers. Focused on both the theory and practice of the four main aspects of quests (spaces, objects, actors, and challenges) each theoretical section is followed by a practical section that contains exercises using the Neverwinter Nights Aurora Toolset. Howard has created a Syllabus, designed for a college-level course, that instructors can use and modify as desired.
Games & Activities

Transgression in Games and Play

Author: Kristine Jørgensen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 328

View: 554

Contributors from a range of disciplines explore boundary-crossing in videogames, examining both transgressive game content and transgressive player actions. Video gameplay can include transgressive play practices in which players act in ways meant to annoy, punish, or harass other players. Videogames themselves can include transgressive or upsetting content, including excessive violence. Such boundary-crossing in videogames belies the general idea that play and games are fun and non-serious, with little consequence outside the world of the game. In this book, contributors from a range of disciplines explore transgression in video games, examining both game content and player actions. The contributors consider the concept of transgression in games and play, drawing on discourses in sociology, philosophy, media studies, and game studies; offer case studies of transgressive play, considering, among other things, how gameplay practices can be at once playful and violations of social etiquette; investigate players' emotional responses to game content and play practices; examine the aesthetics of transgression, focusing on the ways that game design can be used for transgressive purposes; and discuss transgressive gameplay in a societal context. By emphasizing actual player experience, the book offers a contextual understanding of content and practices usually framed as simply problematic. Contributors Fraser Allison, Kristian A. Bjørkelo, Kelly Boudreau, Marcus Carter, Mia Consalvo, Rhys Jones, Kristine Jørgensen, Faltin Karlsen, Tomasz Z. Majkowski, Alan Meades, Torill Elvira Mortensen, Víctor Navarro-Remesal, Holger Pötzsch, John R. Sageng, Tanja Sihvonen, Jaakko Stenros, Ragnhild Tronstad, Hanna Wirman
Games & Activities

Classic Home Video Games, 1972–1984

Author: Brett Weiss

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Games & Activities

Page: 316

View: 617

This reference work provides a comprehensive guide to popular and obscure video games of the 1970s and early 1980s, covering virtually every official United States release for programmable home game consoles of the pre–Nintendo NES era. Included are the following systems: Adventure Vision, APF MP1000, Arcadia 2001, Astrocade, Atari 2600, Atari 5200, Atari 7800, ColecoVision, Fairchild Channel F, Intellivision, Microvision, Odyssey, Odyssey2, RCA Studio II, Telstar Arcade, and Vectrex. Organized alphabetically by console brand, each chapter includes a history and description of the game system, followed by substantive entries for every game released for that console, regardless of when the game was produced. Each video game entry includes publisher/developer information and the release year, along with a detailed description and, frequently, the author’s critique. An appendix lists “homebrew” titles that have been created by fans and amateur programmers and are available for download or purchase. Includes glossary, bibliography and index.
Computers

Computer and Video Game Law

Author: Ashley S. Lipson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 706

View: 940

Fun and games have become serious business as evidenced by the rapidly expanding, multi-billion dollar, global computer and video game industry. The relatively new entertainment medium has been growing exponentially and so, too, have its legal difficulties. This new casebook, with its problems and exercises, deals with all aspects of this fascinating phenomenon, including: Product History and Development, Intellectual Property, Commercial Exploitation, and Regulation. The cases guide the reader down a colorful path of disputes involving such familiar hardware names and game titles as: Magnavox, Gameboy, Nintendo, Playstation, Pong, Pacman, Space Invaders, Tetris, Tomb Raiders, Frogger, Galaxian, Asteroids, Donkey Kong, Pete Rose Baseball and Doom. The casebook is suitable as a primary text for both classes and seminars.