Science

Remote Sensing of Atmosphere and Ocean from Space: Models, Instruments and Techniques

Author: Frank S. Marzano

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 248

View: 582

This book is a collection of the lectures, held at the International Summer School ISSAOS-2000 in L'Aquila (Italy), given by invited lecturers coming from both Europe and the USA. The goal of the book is to provide a broad panorama of spaceborne remote sensing techniques, at both microwave and visible-infrared bands and by both active and passive sensors, for the retrieval of atmospheric and oceanic parameters. A significant emphasis is given to the physical modeling background, instrument potential and limitations, inversion methods and applications. Topics on international remote sensing programs and assimilation techniques into numerical weather forecast models are also touched. The main purpose of the book is to offer to young scientists, Ph.D. or equivalent students, and to all who would like to have a broad-spectrum understanding of spaceborne remote sensing capabilities, introductory material to each remote sensing topic written by the most qualified experts in the field.
Technology & Engineering

Remote Sensing and Modeling of the Atmosphere, Oceans, and Interactions

Author: Tiruvalam Natarajan Krishnamurti

Publisher: Society of Photo Optical

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 322

View: 250

Proceedings of SPIE present the original research papers presented at SPIE conferences and other high-quality conferences in the broad-ranging fields of optics and photonics. These books provide prompt access to the latest innovations in research and technology in their respective fields. Proceedings of SPIE are among the most cited references in patent literature.
Science

Modeling, Data Processing and Remote Sensing in Atmospheric Sciences

Author: Smith Paul

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 283

View: 933

Atmospheric sciences is an umbrella discipline comprising sub-fields such as meteorology, climatology, aeronomy, etc. Advances in science and technology have led to the expansion and advancement of this discipline. Some of the topics that have been covered include remote sensing of the atmosphere, measurement of wind, precipitation, etc. This book is an essential guide for both professionals and those who wish to pursue this discipline further. It attempts to assist those with a goal of delving deeper into the progress of atmospheric sciences.
Marine productivity

Radiative Transfer Modeling in the Coupled Atmosphere-ocean System and Its Application to the Remote Sensing of Ocean Color Imagery

Author: Banghua Yan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Marine productivity

Page: 340

View: 306

"Ocean color is the radiance emanating from the ocean due to scattering by chlorophyll pigments and particles of organic and inorganic origin. Thus, it contains information about chlorophyll concentrations which can be used to estimate primary productivity. Observations of ocean color from space can be used to monitor the variability in marine primary productivity, thereby permitting a quantum leap in our understanding of oceanographic processes from regional to global scales. Satellite remote sensing of ocean color requires accurate removal of the contribution by atmospheric molecules and aerosols to the radiance measured at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). This removal process is called 'atmospheric correction.' Since about 90% of the radiance received by the satellitee sensor comes from the atmosphere, accurate removal of this portion is very important. A prerequisite for accurate atmospheric correction is accurate and reliable simulation of the transport of radiation in the atmosphere-ocean system. This thesis focuses on this radiative transfer process, and investigates the impact of particles in the atmosphere (aerosols) and ocean (oceanic chlorophylls and air bubbles) on our ability to remove the atmospheric contribution from the received signal. To explore these issues, a comprehensive radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-ocean system is used to simulate the radiative transfer process and provide a physically sound link between surface-based measurements of oceanic and atmospheric parameters and radiances observed by satellite-deployed ocean color sensors. This model has been upgraded to provide accurate radiances in arbitrary directions as required to analyze satellite data. The model is then applied to quantify the uncertainties associated with several commonly made assumptions invoked in atmospheric correction algorithms. Since Atmospheric aerosols consist of a mixture of absorbing and non-absorbing components that may or may not be soluble, it becomes a challenging task to model the radiative effects of these particles. It is shown that the contribution of these particles to the TOA radiance depends on the assumptions made concerning how these particles mix and grow in a humid environment. This makes atmospheric correction a very difficult undertaking. Air bubbles in the ocean created by breaking waves give rise to scattered light. Unless this contribution to the radiance leaving the ocean is correctly accounted for, it would be mistakenly attributed to chlorophyll pigments. Thus, the findings in this thesis make an important contribution to the development of an adequate radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-ocean system required for development and assessment of algorithms for atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery"--Leaves iii-iv.
Atmosphere

Remote Sensing and Modeling of the Atmosphere, Oceans, and Interactions V

Author: Tiruvalam Natarajan Krishnamurti

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Atmosphere

Page: 277

View: 483

Proceedings of SPIE present the original research papers presented at SPIE conferences and other high-quality conferences in the broad-ranging fields of optics and photonics. These books provide prompt access to the latest innovations in research and technology in their respective fields. Proceedings of SPIE are among the most cited references in patent literature.