History

Bad Medicine

Author: David Wootton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 904

In this controversial new account of the history of medicine, David Wootton argues that, from the fifth century BC until the 1930s, doctors actually did more harm than good, and asks just how much harm they still do today.
Science

Bad Medicine

Author: Christopher Wanjek

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 422

"Christopher Wanjek uses a take-no-prisoners approach in debunkingthe outrageous nonsense being heaped on a gullible public in thename of science and medicine. Wanjek writes with clarity, humor,and humanity, and simultaneously informs and entertains." -Dr. Michael Shermer, Publisher, Skeptic magazine; monthlycolumnist, Scientific American; author of Why People Believe WeirdThings Prehistoric humans believed cedar ashes and incantations could curea head injury. Ancient Egyptians believed the heart was the centerof thought, the liver produced blood, and the brain cooled thebody. The ancient Greek physician Hippocrates was a big fan ofbloodletting. Today, we are still plagued by countless medicalmyths and misconceptions. Bad Medicine sets the record straight bydebunking widely held yet incorrect notions of how the body works,from cold cures to vaccination fears. Clear, accessible, and highly entertaining, Bad Medicine dispelssuch medical convictions as: * You only use 10% of your brain: CAT, PET, and MRI scans all provethat there are no inactive regions of the brain . . . not evenduring sleep. * Sitting too close to the TV causes nearsightedness: Your motherwas wrong. Most likely, an already nearsighted child sits close tosee better. * Eating junk food will make your face break out: Acne is caused bydead skin cells, hormones, and bacteria, not from a pizza witheverything on it. * If you don't dress warmly, you'll catch a cold: Cold viruses arethe true and only cause of colds. Protect yourself and the ones you love from bad medicine-the brainyou save may be your own.
Canada

Bad Medicine

Author: Jim Grieshaber-Otto

Publisher: Canadian Centre Policy Alternatives

ISBN:

Category: Canada

Page: 192

View: 178

Social Science

Bad Medicine & Good

Author: Wilbur Sturtevant Nye

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 291

View: 122

One of the great tribes of the Southwest Plains, the Kiowas were militantly defiant toward white intruders in their territory and killed more during seventy-five years of raiding than any other tribe. Now settled in southwestern Oklahoma, they are today one of the most progressive Indian groups in the area. In Bad Medicine and Good, Wilbur Sturtevant Nye collects forty-four stories covering Kiowa history from the 1700s through the 1940s, all gleaned from interviews with Kiowas (who actually took part in the events or recalled them from the accounts of their elders), and from the notes of Captain Hugh L Scott at Fort Sill. They cover such topics as the organization and conduct of a raiding party, the brave deeds of war chiefs, the treatment of white captives, the Grandmother gods, the Kiowa sun dance, and the problems of adjusting to white society.
Biography & Autobiography

Bad Medicine

Author: John Reilly

Publisher: Rocky Mountain Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 866

Early in his career, Judge John Reilly did everything by the book. His jurisdiction included a First Nations community plagued by suicide, addiction, poverty, violence and corruption. He steadily handed out prison sentences with little regard for long-term consequences and even less knowledge as to why crime was so rampant on the reserve in the first place. In an unprecedented move that pitted him against his superiors, the legal system he was part of, and one of Canada’s best-known Indian chiefs, the Reverend Dr. Chief John Snow, Judge Reilly ordered an investigation into the tragic and corrupt conditions on the reserve. A flurry of media attention ensued. Some labelled him a racist; others thought he should be removed from his post, claiming he had lost his objectivity. But many on the Stoney Reserve hailed him a hero as he attempted to uncover the dark challenges and difficult history many First Nations communities face. At a time when government is proposing new “tough on crime” legislation, Judge Reilly provides an enlightening and timely perspective. He shows us why harsher punishments for offenders don’t necessarily make our societies safer, why the white justice system is failing First Nations communities, why jail time is not the cure-all answer some think it to be, and how corruption continues to plague tribal leadership.
Fiction

Bad Medicine

Author: Larry Brown

Publisher: Page Publishing Inc

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 262

View: 260

Its been just over a year since Sheriff James Earl was gunned down by what turned our to be three Klu Klux Klan men. James' only and younger brother Joe, who was always known as a carefree fellow loved women, whiskey, cards, and especially cars. He shocked everyone in the county when he and an old black man Ben Davis, survived an attack by the same Klansmen who murdered his brother. The Klansmen had raided the Earl home place in an attempt to murder Ben Davis. Joe
True Crime

Bad Medicine

Author: Charlotte Bismuth

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 368

View: 339

“Charlotte Bismuth gives us a bold and cinematic true crime story about her work at the intersection of medicine and greed. Bad Medicine is a gripping memoir that toggles deftly between the personal and prosecutorial.” —Beth Macy, New York Times bestselling author of Dopesick “Bismuth has written a brilliant account of prosecuting a doctor who became a drug dealer in a white coat. She is haunted by the voices of the dead and listening closely to the voices of the living.” —Nan Goldin, artist, activist, and founder of P.A.I.N. “Bad Medicine is a taut exploration of America’s deadly battle with opioid addiction—an unnerving and inspirational firecracker of a book.” —Karen Abbott, New York Times bestselling author of The Ghosts of Eden Park For fans of Dopesick and Bad Blood, the shocking story of New York’s most infamous pill-pushing doctor, written by the prosecutor who brought him down. In 2010, a brave whistleblower alerted the police to Dr. Stan Li’s corrupt pain management clinic in Queens, New York. Li spent years supplying more than seventy patients a day with oxycodone and Xanax, trading prescriptions for cash. Emergency room doctors, psychiatrists, and desperate family members warned him that his patients were at risk of death but he would not stop. In Bad Medicine, former prosecutor Charlotte Bismuth meticulously recounts the jaw dropping details of this criminal case that would span four years, culminating in a landmark trial. As a new assistant district attorney and single mother, Bismuth worked tirelessly with her team to bring Dr. Li to justice. Bad Medicine is a chilling story of corruption and greed and an important look at the role individual doctors play in America’s opioid epidemic.

BAD MEDICINE

Author: Keith G. Laufenberg

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 218

View: 248

Bad Medicine is another collection of short stories by writer Keith G. Laufenberg that brings the reality of life in America-that of a nation where virtually everything, including health care, is available for profit only and must be bought & paid for-before delivery. Every working and non-working American-disabled, either by sickness or poverty-has lived through this and, to this very day, in 2014, continue to live through it. These stories graphically illustrate why it is the Capitalist System itself that harbors institutions that lie, rob, cheat and steal and all in the name of the very God that they all worship-profit! It shows why they-the the doctors, lawyers, politicians and insurance companies-have a strangle hold on America which can only end in the country experiencing a depression a bankruptcy-or both-or a revolution. These stories will keep you reading long into the day or night as you root for the underdog, even though you know he may not ""win,"" this time around.
Fiction

Bad Medicine

Author: Eileen Dreyer

Publisher: ePublishing Works!

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 423

"Powerful, immensely rich in detail, legend, character, this is a must read." ~Verified reviewer Trauma nurse and part-time death-investigator Molly Burke is having a pretty normal night at her St. Louis Emergency Department. Then a well-connected lawyer is wheeled in, victim of a suspected suicide. One suicide is bad. But when one grows to four in a matter of days, and all the victims are lawyers, the trend stops being an oddity and becomes a real problem. Were these really suicides? Why would successful, hot young lawyers want to kill themselves? Then Molly unearths secrets that powerful people don’t want exposed and the puzzle suddenly becomes a threat. Now she must find the killer, or become the next victim. "With her own unique blend of dark humor, complex motivations and riveting suspense, Eileen Dreyer is a very tough act to beat. A nerve-shattering suspense." ~RT Magazine Publisher's Note: As a former trauma nurse, Eileen Dreyer combines her real-world medical knowledge and superb story-telling to bring readers a series of uniquely plotted, spine-tingling, medical mysteries. Fans of Tami Hoag, Elizabeth George, Nora Roberts as well as John Lutz, Michael Crichton and Patricia Cornwell will enjoy these well-crafted medical thrillers. OTHER MEDICAL SUSPENSE/THRILLERS by Eileen Dreyer: Nothing Personal Brain Dead Bad Medicine If Looks Could Kill
Biography & Autobiography

Bad Medicine

Author: Stephen Soloway

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 264

View: 419

What you don’t know about the American healthcare system might kill you. From fatal malpractice to Medicare fraud, Dr. Stephen Soloway has seen it all over his thirty years practicing medicine. Now, the man known as “Dr. Trump” is ripping off the Band-Aid and exposing the truth about the American healthcare system—the good, the bad, and the rotten. Page after shocking page, you’ll discover the truth about where the coronavirus came from, and if we’ll ever be able to cure it. Learn the sad reality of what Medicare for All would mean for our nation. Find out why you should stay away from hospitals as if your life depended on it. (It does.) Dr. Soloway explains the medical tips and tricks that could save you from amputations, years of pain, or even death. Appointed by President Donald Trump to the President's Council on Sports, Fitness, and Nutrition, Dr. Soloway is a leader in his field, who sat on numerous boards and panels in the pharmacological industry, along with national advisory panels for major companies involved in arthritis or osteoporosis research. His uncanny ability to diagnose even the most complex cases has earned him the reputation of being a real-life Dr. House—minus the pill problem. Beyond his savvy insights into the secrets of our medical system, Dr. Soloway also shares his own rags to riches story, and how dedicated medical professionals can still succeed in this difficult environment. Ultimately, Dr. Soloway has a diagnosis for all Americans: Our healthcare system—and our country as a whole—is headed for disaster. The prescription? Read this book to find out.
Self-Help

BAD MEDICINE

Author: Matthew D. Hirschberg

Publisher: Hawkeye Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 124

View: 179

Fiction

Bad Medicine

Author: Caroline Fardig

Publisher: Caroline Fardig

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 287

View: 336

*A Suspense Magazine Best Book of 2015* What do a smokin’ hot detective, an evil chiropractor, and a couple of blind dates from hell have in common? Lizzie has to wrangle them all in the third book of the LIZZIE HART MYSTERIES series!
Social Science

Bad Medicine

Author: Milton Silverman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 250

The pharmaceutical industry has long and vehemently insisted that it has the willingness, the dedication, and the ability to police itself to insure that the public will not be unnecessarily harmed or defrauded. As the record shows with painful clarity, however, virtually no industry or professional group has ever adequately policed itself, and the pharmaceutical industry is no exception. Where the most flagrant abuses have been exposed and corrected, major credit must probably be divided among the media that publicized the situation, consumer groups that applied pressure, government officials who took actions that were often unpopular, and individual members of the pharmaceutical industry who had the courage to face up to their social responsibilities. In this book, the authors turn their attention to what happened in Third World countries when, because of worldwide pressures, the multinational drug companies largely corrected their notorious abuses. On the basis of painstaking research, much of it conducted in a great many Third World countries, the authors conclude that a plethora of small local firms have filled the dishonest sales channels vacated by the multinationals. The authors show in great detail how local drug firms in the Third World have taken advantage of loose regulatory practices and unscrupulous behavior on the part of regional and national health care professionals to promote the sale of dangerous or worthless drugs as remedies for diseases for which they were never intended. Warnings of bad side effects are omitted from promotional literature, drugs are sold that have not had proper trials, and drug firms have often bribed government officials, doctors, and hospital administrators in order to gain favorable treatment in the importation and sale of their products. Among the many topics treated in this book are the controversy over inexpensive generic drugs (including disclosures of fraud and bribery in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration), the actions of consumer groups, and the key role of government in preventing abuses by drug firms. The authors describe a remarkable attempt in Bangladesh, one of the poorest of all the developing countries, to develop a high-quality local drug industry. They also present as case histories reports on three extremely important drug products or groups—the dipyrones (for control of pain and fever), high-dosage estrogen-progesterone hormone products (for use in pregnancy tests), and clioquinol or Enterovioform (for treatment of diarrhea)—all of which were or still are centers of worldwide, heated controversy.
Juvenile Fiction

Bad Medicine

Author: Carolyn Keene

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 160

View: 394

Ned’s friend Trevor is a promising young doctor, but his patients keep disappearing. As Nancy unravels the mystery, the bodysnatcher stalks her. Could this be Nancy’s final operation?
Comics & Graphic Novels

Bad Medicine, Volume One

Author: Nunzio DeFilippis

Publisher: Oni Press

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page:

View: 438

Pulled out of exile from a dark corner of the world, renowned-surgeon-turned-fringe-medicine-eccentric Doctor Randal Horne must return to New York City to investigate a tragic research lab accident that’s left one man dead, and inexplicably headless. Now with the help of a distrusting NYPD detective and a team of doctors from the CDC, Horne must diagnose this and other seemingly unexplainable medical phenomenon in a world where the line between medical science and science fiction is blurry at best.
Science

A Brief History of Bad Medicine

Author: Ian Schott

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 160

View: 647

A doctor removes the normal, healthy side of a patient's brain instead of the malignant tumor. A man whose leg is scheduled for amputation wakes up to find his healthy leg removed. These recent examples are part of a history of medical disasters and embarrassments as old as the profession itself. In Brief History of Bad Medicine, Robert M. Youngson and Ian Schott have written the definitive account of medical mishap in modern and not-so- modern times. From famous quacks to curious forms of sexual healing, from blunders with the brain to drugs worse than the diseases they are intended to treat, the book reveals shamefully dangerous doctors, human guinea pigs, and the legendary surgeon who was himself a craven morphine addict. Exploring the line between the comical and the tragic, the honest mistake and the intentional crime, Brief History of Bad Medicine illustrates once and for all that you can't always trust the people in white coats.
Fiction

Bad Medicine

Author: Ron Querry

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 584

Dr. Push Foster faces a silent killer ravaging the Navajo Nation for which Western medicine cannot provide an answer, forcing him across a cultural and supernatural divide
Fiction

Bad Medicine

Author: Suzanne Proulx

Publisher: Fawcett

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 260

View: 775

Victoria Lucci, the risk manager for a Denver hospital, confronts a dangerous new challenge in the form of a crazed gunman loose in her hospital who has taken a group hostage in the maternity ward, including a young woman about to give birth.
Health & Fitness

Doing Harm

Author: Maya Dusenbery

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 400

View: 847

In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial director of Feministing.com, reveals how inadequate, inappropriate, and even dangerous treatment threatens women’s lives and well-being. Editor of the award-winning site Feministing.com, Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and sociological research, interviews with experts within and outside the medical establishment, and personal stories from women across the country to provide the first comprehensive, accessible look at how sexism in medicine harms women today. Dusenbery reveals how conditions that disproportionately affect women, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic pain conditions, and Alzheimer’s disease, are neglected and woefully under-researched. "Contested" diseases, such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, that are 70 to 80 percent female-dominated are so poorly understood that they have not yet been fully accepted as "real" conditions by the whole of the profession. Meanwhile, despite a wealth of evidence showing the impact of biological difference between the sexes in everything from drug responses to symptoms to risk factors for various diseases—even the symptoms of a heart attack!—medicine continues to take a one-size-fits-all approach: that of a 70 kilogram white man. In addition, women are negatively impacted by the biases and stereotypes that dismiss them as "chronic complainers," leading to long delays—often years long—to get diagnosed. The consequences are catastrophic. Offering a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias and laying out its effects, Doing Harm will change the way we look at healthcare for women.
Biography & Autobiography

Bad Medicine

Author: Terry Ledgard

Publisher: Penguin Group Australia

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 977

After growing up as a desert rat in the Coober Pedy outback, Terry Ledgard was no stranger to mischief and adventure. Having survived puberty unscathed, he joined the Army and rose through the ranks to become an SAS medic, and soon found himself heading for Afghanistan. Life in Afghanistan was hectic and intense. In between life-and-death missions and makeshift surgery out in the field, pranks and mischief kept spirits up back on the base. Courage under fire was important, but maybe not as important as being to laugh it all off at the end of the day. As Terry integrated back into the Real World, his life became a slow-motion train wreck when he faced a gritty battle with post-traumatic stress disorder. Luckily, though, the Army had taught him everything he needed to overcome the affliction, and through hard work, determination and his trademark humour, he reclaimed himself. Immediate, funny and often outrageous in its honesty, Bad Medicine is an exhilarating on-the-ground account of life as an SAS medic in the world's most intense warzone.