Sports & Recreation

Before They Were the Cubs

Author: Jack Bales

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 262

View: 186

Founded in 1869, the Chicago Cubs are a charter member of the National League and the last remaining of the eight original league clubs still playing in the city in which the franchise started. Drawing on newspaper articles, books and archival records, the author chronicles the team’s early years. He describes the club’s planning stages of 1868; covers the decades when the ballplayers were variously called White Stockings, Colts, and Orphans; and relates how a sportswriter first referred to the young players as Cubs in the March 27, 1902, issue of the Chicago Daily News. Reprinted selections from firsthand accounts provide a colorful narrative of baseball in 19th-century America, as well as a documentary history of the Chicago team and its members before they were the Cubs.
Sports & Recreation

100 Things Giants Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die

Author: Bill Chastain

Publisher: Triumph Books

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 720

Most San Francisco Giants fans have taken in a game or two at AT&T Park, have seen highlights of Willie Mays’ basket catch on YouTube, and were thrilled by the team’s World Series wins in 2010 and 2012, but even the die-hards—those who remember which pitcher started the first home game in San Francisco’s history, have attended a spring training game at Scottsdale Stadium, or know how many home runs Barry Bonds hit into McCovey Cove during his record-setting career—will appreciate this ultimate resource guide for true fans of the San Francisco Giants. For both boosters from the days of Bobby Thomson and recent supporters of Bruce Bochy, Matt Cain, and Buster Posey, these are the 100 things all fans need to know and do in their lifetime. Longtime sportswriter Bill Chastain has collected every essential piece of Giants knowledge and trivia, as well as must-do activities, and ranks them from 1 to 100, providing an entertaining and easy-to-follow checklist that leads the way to achieving fan superstardom. This updated World Series edition features the Giants' unforgettable 2012 season, including Cain’s perfect game, Posey’s MVP season, and the team's comeback playoff triumphs before sweeping Detroit.
Sports & Recreation

Going, Going ... Caught!

Author: Jason Aronoff

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 276

View: 609

"Extensive research yields a wealth of information on these famous catches, including commentary by period sportswriters, players, and, often, the man who snagged the ball"--Provided by publisher.
Sports & Recreation

Before the Curse

Author: Troy Soos

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 226

View: 925

In this revised and updated version of his highly regarded book, author Troy Soos covers the history of baseball in New England from 1791 through 1918, the year in which the Red Sox won their final World Series of the 20th century. Beginning with the recently discovered Pittsfield, Massachusetts, document, the history of early New England baseball and its folk predecessors is briefly discussed, followed by the advent of pay for play, when the Boston Red Stockings dominated baseball's first major league. Turning next to the 1870s, 1880s and 1890s, decades that saw pro baseball establish itself in especially the larger cities of the Northeast, Soos demonstrates that the amateur game became a fixture of the towns, schools, and even the factories. Success at the game's highest level followed, as Boston won five NL championships in the 1890s before taking the first modern World Series in 1903.When five more world championships came during the 1910s, New Englanders could justifiably argue that the country's oldest region sat atop the baseball world. By the close of 1918, New England was baseball mad, and the 86 years of collapses, near-misses, and outright struggles that lay ahead would do nothing to diminish the game's high place in the regional culture.
History

Fenway 1946

Author: Michael Connolly

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 236

Boston writer Michael Connolly captures the magic of American’s return to normalcy after World War II in this intimate portrait of a city and the baseball team it loves. Fenway 1946 celebrates the city and the team and the spirit of that wonderful 1946 season in Boston—a season, as usual the broke fans’ hearts—as America returned to return to peacetime pastimes. And none was more American than baseball. Along the way he brings out the stories and personalities that made that year so special in the Hub. From returning veterans like Ted Williams and young Congressman John F. Kennedy and thousands of others and their families who worried while they were in Europe or the Pacific, the 1946 Red Sox season was a celebration. It was catharsis. It was what made American great. Husbands and sons were coming home to the open arms of a grateful nation. This included five hundred major leaguers who fought in World War II. The homecoming of America’s best sparked a spirit of collective pride from coast to coast—and New England was not exempt. For the previous five years, America sat around its radio listening to war reports. Now they would gather in the parlors to enjoy baseball once again. Baseball had always been a thread that connected the country--a sport that linked generations. Opening Day 1946 was a tangible reminder that the country was at peace – back to the way things were. Nowhere was this more relevant than in Boston. From Scollay Square to South Boston to the North End, veterans in their uniforms, kids with bats over their shoulder and housewives were talking about the return of Ted Williams and a roster that was considered the best in the league. Expectations were high – as always, at Fenway Park. Fans somehow knew this would be their year. The 1946 Boston Red Sox finished first in the American League with a record of 104 wins and 50 losses. And they wouldn’t disappoint (until October). ***** * In January of 1946, Ted Williams, Dom DiMaggio, John Pesky and Bobby Doerr are released from the military and vow to come back as good as ever. * American and especially Boston are desperate for real baseball. In 1945, the Red Sox averaged only 7,814 fans a game at Fenway. In 1946, with Williams and the team back home, they played in front of over 33,000 in their last scrimmage game at Fenway Park before the season started. * Opening Day for the league was in Washington D.C. between the Senators and the Red Sox. President Harry Truman threw out the first pitch. Ted Williams went 6-12 in the series and was mobbed by Senator fans who rip his shirt off while he leaves the field. As he approached the dugout, Williams tossed his hat to a GI sitting in the lower box * The home Opening Day for the Red Sox at Fenway Park was an event for the ages. Before the game Marines re-enacted the flag-raising at Iowa Jima in center field. The first pitch was thrown out by Governor Tobin. Standing by his side was a local war hero, John Murdoch, who got a bigger ovation than Ted Williams. Murdoch was part of the team that saved boxing world champion Barney Ross, whose bravery at Guadalcanal was unparalleled. * Red Sox won an amazing 41 of their first 50 games. Ted Williams hits eleven home runs in just June. A spirit of euphoria overtakes Boston as the always hopeful fans pray for the Red Sox to break their 28-year curse. * All Star game is played at Fenway where Ted Williams and voted MVP after going 4 for 4 with 2 home runs including a grand slam. * In September, the Red Sox win a matinee game 1-0 in Cleveland on a Ted Williams inside the park home run. Later that day the Tigers lose giving Boston the pennant. Red Sox owner, Tom Yawkey throws a party in his hotel room. No one can find Ted Williams. Not telling anyone, Williams went to the local veterans’ hospital in Cleveland and spent the night with a dying veteran. * Red Sox clinch the pennant. In one year their win total improved by 33 games (71-83 in 1945 to 104-50 in 1946). America is returning to the ballpark. At Fenway alone attendance went from 603,794 in 1945 to 1,416,944 in 1946. * In the National League, the Brooklyn Dodgers and the St. Louis Cardinals tie for the pennant. While Boston awaits the National League playoff to conclude, Tom Yawkey invites American League All Stars to come to Fenway Park and scrimmage his Red Sox to keep them sharp. Hall of Famers, DiMaggio, Greenberg and Appling all sacrifice the first week of their offseason in loyalty to the American League. DiMaggio forgets his uniform and has to wear a Red Sox uniform for the game. A game in which Williams is hit on the elbow with a pitch and never fully recovers in the World Series. * In anticipation of Game Seven of the World Series in St. Louis, newspapers across the country split the front page with previews of the big game and the expected execution that day of Herman Goering (he would avoid that by killing himself) and ten other high-ranking Nazi’s in Nuremberg, providing Americans further validation that the war was behind them. * President Harry Truman’s team beats the Red Sox in the penultimate game when Johnny Pesky holds the relay throw from the outfield allowing Enos Slaughter to score from first on a single.
Sports & Recreation

Chief Bender's Burden

Author: Tom Swift

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 339

View: 976

The greatest American Indian baseball player of all time, Charles Albert Bender, was, according to a contemporary, the coolest pitcher in the game. Using a trademark delivery, an impressive assortment of pitches that may have included the game s first slider, and an apparently unflappable demeanor, he earned a reputation as baseball s great clutch pitcher during tight Deadball Era pennant races and in front of boisterous World Series crowds. More remarkably yet, Chief Bender s Hall of Fame career unfolded in the face of immeasurable prejudice. This skillfully told and complete account of Bender s life is also a portrait of greatness of character maintained despite incredible pressure of how a celebrated man thrived while carrying an untold weight on his shoulders. With a journalist s eye for detail and a novelist s feel for storytelling, Tom Swift takes readers on Bender s improbable journey from his early years on the White Earth Reservation, to his development at the Carlisle Indian School, to his big break and eventual rise to the pinnacle of baseball. The story of a paradoxical American sports hero, one who achieved a once-unfathomable celebrity while suffering the harsh injustices of a racially intolerant world, Chief Bender s Burden is an eye-opening and inspiring narrative of a unique American life.
History

The College World Series

Author: W. C. Madden

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 521

Since 1950, Omaha's Rosenblatt Stadium (formerly Municipal Stadium) has hosted the nation's top college baseball programs in the College World Series. Baseball fans from every corner of the country have taken the annual "Road to Omaha" and packed the seats to see championship baseball at its best. In 1954 thousands saw Jim Ehrler of Texas toss the tourney's first no-hitter en route to the Longhorns winning back-to-back CWS championships. Fans at the 1970 tournament saw Southern Cal defeat Florida State in the midst of their unmatched five-year championship run. In 1996 Rosenblatt's faithful took in the dramatic bottom-of-the-ninth, two-out, two-run homer by Louisiana State's Warren Morris, giving his team a 9-8 upset victory over powerhouse Miami.
Medical

Promising Care

Author: Donald M. Berwick

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 320

View: 889

Promising Care: How We Can Rescue Health Care by Improving It collects 16 speeches given over a period of 10 years by Donald M. Berwick, an internationally acclaimed champion of health care improvement throughout the course of his long and storied career as a physician, health care educator and policy expert, leader of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), and administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. These landmark speeches (including all of Berwick’s speeches delivered at IHI’s annual National Forum on Quality Improvement in Health Care from 2003 to 2012) clearly show why our medical systems don’t reliably contribute to our overall health. As a remedy he offers a vision for making our systems better – safer, more effective, more efficient, and more humane. Each of Berwick’s compelling speeches is preceded by a brief commentary by a prominent figure in health care, policy, or politics who has a unique connection to that particular speech. Contributors include such notables as Tom Daschle, Paul Batalden, and Lord Nigel Crisp. Their commentaries reflect on how it felt to hear the speech in the context in which it was delivered, and assess its relevance in today’s health care environment. The introduction is by Maureen Bisognano, CEO of Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and author of Pursuing the Triple Aim. Praise for previous books by Don Berwick Curing Health Care: "The book is an easy and affirming read for anyone who is familiar with and has used the TQM teachings of Dr. Joseph M. Juran and Dr. W. Edwards Deming and would be a simple and informative introduction to the concepts for anyone who has been hearing about TQM but has no idea what it is all about and wants to know more." —Permanent Fixes (blog) "Donald Berwick is the most clearly heard evangelist of applying industrial methods of continuous quality improvement in health care." —Annals of Internal Medicine Escape Fire: "With an effective blend of common sense, real-life stories, persuasive metaphors, and out-of-the-box thinking, Dr. Berwick’s presentations make for fascinating reading for anyone interested in improving America’s $1.7 trillion health care system." —Piper Report "Anyone interested in change in the healthcare system would enjoy this book. In degree programs, the various speeches would be useful for discussion in a health policy readings course." —The Annals of Pharmacotherapy