African Americans

Berbers and Blacks

Author: David Prescott Barrows

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African Americans

Page: 251

View: 532

Berbers and Blacks

Author: David-Prescott Barrows (général)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 251

View: 982

Religion

Illuminating the Darkness

Author: Habeeb Akande

Publisher: Ta-Ha Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 160

View: 684

Illuminating the Darkness critically addresses the issue of racial discrimination and colour prejudice in religious history. Tackling common misconceptions, the author seeks to elevate the status of blacks and North Africans in Islam. The book is divided into two sections: Part l of the book explores the concept of race, 'blackness', slavery, interracial marriage and racism in Islam in the light of the Qur'an, Hadith and early historical sources. Part ll of the book consists of a compilation of short biographies of noble black and North African Muslim men and women in Islamic history including Prophets, Companions of the Prophet and more recent historical figures. Following in the tradition of revered scholars of Islam such as al-Jahiz, Ibn al-Jawzi and al-Suyuti who wrote about this topic, Illuminating the Darkness is structured according to a similar monographic arrangement.
Africa, French-speaking West

The Oasis of Salt

Author: Knut S. Vikør

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Africa, French-speaking West

Page: 342

View: 638

Kawar, an oasis in the centre of the Sahara, rose to prominence on revenues from the vast quantities of salt it produced and traded with the south. This study traces Kawar's history from classical times to the colonial conquest and occupation of 1906, focusing on its role in salt production.
History

Black Morocco

Author: Chouki El Hamel

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 400

Black Morocco: A History of Slavery, Race, and Islam chronicles the experiences, identity and achievements of enslaved black people in Morocco from the sixteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth century. Chouki El Hamel argues that we cannot rely solely on Islamic ideology as the key to explain social relations and particularly the history of black slavery in the Muslim world, for this viewpoint yields an inaccurate historical record of the people, institutions and social practices of slavery in Northwest Africa. El Hamel focuses on black Moroccans' collective experience beginning with their enslavement to serve as the loyal army of the Sultan Isma'il. By the time the Sultan died in 1727, they had become a political force, making and unmaking rulers well into the nineteenth century. The emphasis on the political history of the black army is augmented by a close examination of the continuity of black Moroccan identity through the musical and cultural practices of the Gnawa.
History

Megalith

Author: Aylmer von Fleischer

Publisher: Aylmer von Fleischer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 357

On the plains of Wiltshire in England lie the remains of ancient giant stones. Exactly which people built these stones remains the eternal question. Just like the pyramids of Egypt its origins remain shrouded in mystery. Various theories have been put forward as to the race or otherwise of these builders, but still, much uncertainty remains. The evidence is simply overwhelming that the earliest inhabitants of Britain and Ireland were Blacks. Mythological, archeological, linguistic and other sources have substantiated this remarkable fact. Candid authorities like the British Egyptologists Gerald Massey and Albert Churchward, the Scottish historian David Mac Ritchie, and the British antiquarian Godfrey Higgins, have done exhaustive research and brought many facts to our knowledge. Tacitus, Pliny, Claudian and other writers have described the Blacks they encountered in the British Isles as "Black as Ethiopians," "Cum Nigris Gentibus," "nimble-footed blackamoors," and so on. This book reveals much about the Black presence in the early British Isles, including the "mysterious" builders of Stonehenge. We learn about the Black Fomorians, Partholonians, Nemedians, Firbolgs, Tuatha De Danann, Black Danes, Black Douglases, the giants or Cyclopes and so on. We also learn about the Black serpent-worshiping Druids who built serpentine monuments like those at Avebury and Carnac, as well as the builders of the Round Towers of Ireland. The fact remains, that Blacks have played a very important role in the early history, traditions, religion and so on, of early Britain and elsewhere than is generally known and acknowledged. This is a must-read book.
History

Ptolemy's Africa

Author: W.F.G. Lacroix

Publisher: TWENTYSIX

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 88

View: 773

Ptolemy's map of Africa dates from the 2nd century AD. And for a long time it was thought that the Alexandrian geographer knew well the greater part of the continent, for it was only south of the equator that his information became scarce. But then, in 1863, the French geographer Vivien de Saint-Martin came to the conclusion that the Sudan - interpreted here as the area between the Sahara and the rain forest - had remained unknown to the Classical world. Even Ptolemy had no idea what it looked like there or which people lived there.To cover up his ignorance Ptolemy had put his rivers, peoples and towns far south of where they really belonged. And that is what historians believe up to this very day. But is this picture correct? Was Ptolemy the man to cover up his ignorance? Is Vivien de Saint-Martin's really a solid line of reasoning? Or have we perhaps to do here with some sort of wishful thinking? What could be more welcome in those days than an unknown African interior, a huge area waiting to be discovered, conquered, colonized and missionized? Could it be after all that the Sudan was part of the known world in Classical Antiquity? It all depends on whether or not this area is on Ptolemy's map of Africa. On a former work of Lacroix, Africa in Antiquity, the critic wrote: "Lacroix produces considerable evidence for his topographical identifications from an entirely new perspective, which should be considered by future scholars of the Geographia. Much discussion can ensue, and relevant information can be found there." - Journal of African History, 40, no. 3 (1999), p. 477-478.
African Americans

Black Labor, White Wealth

Author: Claud Anderson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African Americans

Page: 250

View: 949

"Dr. Anderson's first book is a classic. It tracks slavery and Jim Crow public policies that used black labor to construct a superpower nation. It details how black people were socially engineered into the lowest level of a real life Monopoly game, which they are neither playing or winning. Black Labor is a comprehensive analysis of the issues of race. Dr. Anderson uses the analysis in this book to offer solutions to America's race problem." -- Amazon website.
History

Moorish Europe

Author: Aylmer von Fleischer

Publisher: Aylmer von Fleischer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 580

In 711 A.D., the Black Moors and others sailed across the straits of Gibraltar and invaded Europe. They stayed in Iberia for centuries. Although they could be brutal at times, their efforts helped lift Europe out of the 'Dark Ages' and ushered in the Renaissance. Those who have a copy of 'Retake Your Fame' need not buy this ebook.
Morocco

Black Sunrise

Author: Wilfrid Blunt

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Morocco

Page: 294

View: 812

Sahara

Sahara

Author: René Gardi

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Sahara

Page: 149

View: 847

History

Diasporic Africa

Author: Michael A. Gomez

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 751

Diasporic Africa presents the most recent research on the history and experiences of people of African descent outside of the African continent. By incorporating Europe and North Africa as well as North America, Latin America, and the Caribbean, this reader shifts the discourse on the African diaspora away from its focus solely on the Americas, underscoring the fact that much of the movement of people of African descent took place in Old World contexts. This broader view allows for a more comprehensive approach to the study of the African diaspora. The volume provides an overview of African diaspora studies and features as a major concern a rigorous interrogation of "identity." Other primary themes include contributions to western civilization, from religion, music, and sports to agricultural production and medicine, as well as the way in which our understanding of the African diaspora fits into larger studies of transnational phenomena.