History

Beyond the Killing Fields

Author: Usha Welaratna

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 523

In 1975, after years of civil war, Cambodians welcomed the Khmer Rouge. Once in power, the regime closed Cambodia to the outside world. Four years later, when the Vietnamese invaded Cambodia and defeated the Khmer Rouge, the world learned how the Khmer Rouge had turned the country into killing fields. After the Vietnamese takeover, thousands of Cambodians fled their homeland. This book presents the Cambodian refugee experience through nine first-person narratives of men, women and children who survived the holocaust and have begun new lives in America.
History

Beyond the Killing Fields

Author: Sydney Hillel Schanberg

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 427

An anthology of war reporting and commentary by the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist includes articles covering the Vietnam War, Cambodia, and the Iraq War.
Political Science

Behind the Killing Fields

Author: Gina Chon

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 212

View: 671

In recent history, atrocities have often been committed in the name of lofty ideals. One of the most disturbing examples took place in Cambodia's Killing Fields, where tens of thousands of victims were executed and hastily disposed of by Khmer Rouge cadres. Nearly thirty years after these bloody purges, two journalists entered the jungles of Cambodia to uncover secrets still buried there. Based on more than 1,000 hours of interviews with the top surviving Khmer Rouge leader, Nuon Chea, Behind the Killing Fields follows the journey of a man who began as a dedicated freedom fighter and wound up accused of crimes against humanity. Known as Brother Number 2, Chea was Pol Pot's top lieutenant. He is now in prison, facing prosecution in a United Nations-Cambodian tribunal for his actions during the Khmer Rouge rule, when more than two million Cambodians died. The book traces how the seeds of the Killing Fields were sown and what led one man to believe that mass killing was necessary for the greater good. Coauthor Sambath Thet, a Khmer Rouge survivor, shares his personal perspectives on the murderous regime and how some victims have managed to rebuild their lives. The stories of Nuon Chea and Sambath Thet collide when the two meet. While Thet holds Chea responsible for the death of his parents and brother, he strives for understanding over revenge in order to reveal the forces that destroyed his homeland in the name of creating utopia. In this age of suicide bombers and terror alerts, the world is still at a loss to comprehend the violence of zealots. Behind the Killing Fields bravely confronts this challenge in an exclusive portrait of one man's political madness and another's personal wisdom.
Cambodia

The Killing Fields

Author: Sydney Schanberg

Publisher: Coronet

ISBN:

Category: Cambodia

Page: 128

View: 266

History

The Death and Life of Dith Pran

Author: Sydney H. Schanberg

Publisher: RosettaBooks

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 124

View: 911

The US journalist’s account of his colleague’s struggle to survive the Cambodian genocide—the basis for the Oscar–winning film The Killing Fields. On April 17, 1975, Khmer Rouge soldiers seized Phnom Penh—the capital of Cambodia—and began a brutal genocide that left millions dead. Dith Pran, a Cambodian working as an assistant to American reporter Sydney H. Schanberg, was a witness to these events. While his employer managed to escape across the border, Dith Pran fled into the Cambodian countryside—and into the heart of the massacre. The basis for the acclaimed movie The Killing Fields, this is the compelling account of the days before the fall of Phnom Penh. It’s the story of one man’s struggle for survival in a country that had become a death camp for millions of its citizens—and another man’s failed efforts to keep his friend and colleague safe. Written within a year of the atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge, it is a work of both historical and literary significance. Sydney H. Schanberg contributed a moving new foreword to this first eBook edition.
Social Science

Asian American Histories of the United States

Author: Catherine Ceniza Choy

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 768

An inclusive and landmark history, emphasizing how essential Asian American experiences are to any understanding of US history Original and expansive, Asian American Histories of the United States is a nearly 200-year history of Asian migration, labor, and community formation in the US. Reckoning with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the surge in anti-Asian hate and violence, award-winning historian Catherine Ceniza Choy presents an urgent social history of the fastest growing group of Americans. The book features the lived experiences and diverse voices of immigrants, refugees, US-born Asian Americans, multiracial Americans, and workers from industries spanning agriculture to healthcare. Despite significant Asian American breakthroughs in American politics, arts, and popular culture in the twenty-first century, a profound lack of understanding of Asian American history permeates American culture. Choy traces how anti-Asian violence and its intersection with misogyny and other forms of hatred, the erasure of Asian American experiences and contributions, and Asian American resistance to what has been omitted are prominent themes in Asian American history. This ambitious book is fundamental to understanding the American experience and its existential crises of the early twenty-first century.
Travel

Beyond the Devil's Teeth Paperback

Author: Tahir Shah

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 447

Forty-five million years ago, the supercontinent of Gondwanaland split apart. This created what are now known as India, Africa and South America. The huge landmass was named after the Gond people of India. Meeting a Gond storyteller on a visit to Bombay, Tahir Shah heard their ancient saga. He vowed to visit all three parts of Gondwanaland. As he travelled he met an extraordinary range of wanderers and expatriates, attended magical ceremonies and sought mythical treasures. Roughing it most of the way, Shah's expeditions move through sweltering India and Pakistan, Uganda and Rwanda, Kenya and Liberia, Brazil and finally Argentina's Patagonian glaciers. Roughing it for most of the journey, Shah shared his travels and his tales with a diverting mix of eccentric and entertaining characters, from Osman and Prideep, Bombay's answer to Laurel and Hardy, to Oswaldo Rodrigues Oswaldo, a well turned out Patagonian version of Danny De Vito.

Beyond the Devil's Teeth

Author: Tahir Shah

Publisher: eBook Partnership

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 477

Forty-five million years ago, the supercontinent of Gondwanaland split apart. This created what are now known as India, Africa and South America. The huge landmass was named after the Gond people of India. Meeting a Gond storyteller on a visit to Bombay, Tahir Shah heard their ancient saga. He vowed to visit all three parts of Gondwanaland. As he travelled he met an extraordinary range of wanderers and expatriates, attended magical ceremonies and sought mythical treasures. Roughing it most of the way, Shah's expeditions move through sweltering India and Pakistan, Uganda and Rwanda, Kenya and Liberia, Brazil and finally Argentina's Patagonian glaciers.Roughing it for most of the journey, Shah shared his travels and his tales with a diverting mix of eccentric and entertaining characters, from Osman and Prideep, Bombay's answer to Laurel and Hardy, to Oswaldo Rodrigues Oswaldo, a well turned out Patagonian version of Danny De Vito.
Photography

Beyond the Killing Fields

Author: Josh Getlin

Publisher: Aperture

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 220

View: 810

This book is a photographic witness of the lifestyle of displaced Cambodians who still live in camps on the Thai border. The book draws its title from the Khmer Rouge genocide that took the lives of more that one million Cambodians from 1975 to 1979. When Vietnamese troops intervened in 1979, thousands of Cambodians sought refuge along the Thai border, many of them in settlements just inside Cambodia, hoping for a quick return home. However, civil war broke out in Cambodia and the border camps that had been set up to temporarily house displaced persons became outposts for Cambodian resistance leaders and were thus military targets. In 1985 the Vietnamese and allied Cambodian forces drove the inhabitants of the camps over the border into Thailand, where an estimated 350,000 still live in dusty, crowded camps, subject to artillery bombardments. There are eight such camps, Site 2 being the largest with an estimated 200,000 residents. Because the Cambodians are labelled 'displaced persons' rather than 'refugees', they are not eligible for resettlement and do not qualify for UNHCR protection. A new international organization, the United Nations Border Relief Operations (UNBRO) was established to distribute food, water and housing material to the camps on a temporary basis.
Social Science

Grace after Genocide

Author: Carol A. Mortland

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 366

Grace after Genocide is the first comprehensive ethnography of Cambodian refugees, charting their struggle to transition from life in agrarian Cambodia to survival in post-industrial America, while maintaining their identities as Cambodians. The ethnography contrasts the lives of refugees who arrived in America after 1975, with their focus on Khmer traditions, values, and relations, with those of their children who, as descendants of the Khmer Rouge catastrophe, have struggled to become Americans in a society that defines them as different. The ethnography explores America’s mid-twentieth-century involvement in Southeast Asia and its enormous consequences on multiple generations of Khmer refugees.