Transportation

Bicycles in American Highway Planning

Author: Bruce D. Epperson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 248

View: 508

The United States differs from other developed nations in the extent to which its national bicycle transportation policy relies on the use of unmodified roadways, with cyclists obeying the same traffic regulations as motor vehicles. This policy—known as “vehicular cycling”—evolved between 1969, when the “10-speed boom” saw a sharp increase in adult bicycling, and 1991, when the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials adopted an official policy that on-road bikeways were not desirable. This policy resulted from a growing realization by highway engineers and experienced club cyclists that they had parallel interests: the cyclists preferred to ride on highways, because most bikeways were not designed for high speeds and pack riding; and the highway engineers did not want to divert funding from roadways to construct bikeways. Using contemporary magazine articles, government reports, and archival material from industry lobbying groups and national cycling organizations, this book tells the story of how America became a nation of bicyclists without bikeways.
History

The Cycling City

Author: Evan Friss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 610

Cycling has experienced a renaissance in the United States, as cities around the country promote the bicycle as an alternative means of transportation. In the process, debates about the nature of bicycles—where they belong, how they should be ridden, how cities should or should not accommodate them—have played out in the media, on city streets, and in city halls. Very few people recognize, however, that these questions are more than a century old. The Cycling City is a sharp history of the bicycle’s rise and fall in the late nineteenth century. In the 1890s, American cities were home to more cyclists, more cycling infrastructure, more bicycle friendly legislation, and a richer cycling culture than anywhere else in the world. Evan Friss unearths the hidden history of the cycling city, demonstrating that diverse groups of cyclists managed to remap cities with new roads, paths, and laws, challenge social conventions, and even dream up a new urban ideal inspired by the bicycle. When cities were chaotic and filthy, bicycle advocates imagined an improved landscape in which pollution was negligible, transportation was silent and rapid, leisure spaces were democratic, and the divisions between city and country were blurred. Friss argues that when the utopian vision of a cycling city faded by the turn of the century, its death paved the way for today’s car-centric cities—and ended the prospect of a true American cycling city ever being built.
Technology & Engineering

Invisible Bicycle

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 296

View: 961

The Invisible Bicycle revisits and questions the existing timelines of bicycle history to create a more nuanced understanding of why and how the popularity of the bicycle and cycling has changed over time and varies in different locations.
Sports & Recreation

Bike Battles

Author: James Longhurst

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 306

View: 113

Americans have been riding bikes for more than a century now. So why are most American cities still so ill-prepared to handle cyclists? James Longhurst, a historian and avid cyclist, tackles that question by tracing the contentious debates between American bike riders, motorists, and pedestrians over the shared road. Bike Battles explores the different ways that Americans have thought about the bicycle through popular songs, merit badge pamphlets, advertising, films, newspapers and sitcoms. Those associations shaped the actions of government and the courts when they intervened in bike policy through lawsuits, traffic control, road building, taxation, rationing, import tariffs, safety education and bike lanes from the 1870s to the 1970s. Today, cycling in American urban centers remains a challenge as city planners, political pundits, and residents continue to argue over bike lanes, bike-share programs, law enforcement, sustainability, and public safety. Combining fascinating new research from a wide range of sources with a true passion for the topic, Longhurst shows us that these battles are nothing new; in fact they’re simply a continuation of the original battle over who is - and isn’t - welcome on our roads. Watch the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNleJ0tDvqg
Nature

Planning for Cycling

Author: H McClintock

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 344

View: 871

Successful cycling planning depends on combining improvements to infrastructure with education. There are chapters examining both national strategies and local initiatives in cities around the world, including such topics as changes to existing road infrastructure and the integration of cycling with public transport. Since education is a critical element in cycling planning, contributors also consider such topics as developing healthy travel habits in the young and ways of promoting cycling. A number of chapters look at the complex relationship between cars and cycling, discussing how roads can be successfully shared between these two modes of transport. With its blend of practical experience and suggestions for improvement, Planning for cycling is essential reading for urban planners, environmental groups and those researching in this area. Describes how creating an effective policy for cycling involves combining improvements to infrastructure with education Chapters examine both national strategies and local initiatives in cities around the world Examines the complex relationship between cars and cycling and discusses how roads can be successfully shared between these two modes of transport
Architecture

Sustainable Transportation Planning

Author: Jeffrey Tumlin

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 320

View: 822

"The Great American Dream of cruising down the parkway, zipping from here to there at any time has given way to a true nightmare that is destroying the environment, costing billions and deeply impacting our personal well-being. Getting from A to B has never been more difficult, expensive or miserable. It doesn't have to be this way. Jeffrey Tumlin's book Sustainable Transportation Planning offers easy-to-understand, clearly explained tips and techniques that will allow us to quite literally take back our roads. Essential reading for anyone who wants to drive our transportation system out of the gridlock." -Marianne Cusato, home designer and author of Get Your House Right: Architectural Elements to Use and Avoid ?The book is full of useful ideas on nearly every page.? ? Bill DiBennedetto of Triple Pundit As transportations-related disciplines of urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, urban economics, and social policy have undergone major internal reform efforts in recent decades Written in clear, easy-to-follow language, this book provides planning practitioners with the tools they need to achieve their cities? economic development, social equity and ecological sustainability goals. Starting with detailed advice for improving each mode of transportation, the book offers guidance on balancing the needs of each mode against each other, whether on a downtown street, or a small town neighborhood, or a regional network.
Sports & Recreation

Cycling the Great Divide, 2nd Edition

Author: Michael McCoy

Publisher: Mountaineers Books

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 240

View: 553

CLICK HERE to download the first chapter from Cycling the Great Divide, 2nd Edition * Mountain bikers from around the world test their mettle on this 2,745-mile route each year * Ultra cycling, including this route through the Rockies, are increasing in popularity * 245 miles have been added to the route since the first edition was published and are now covered in this new update Mostly dirt roads, a little pavement, some single track, and 100% adventure await on the great Divide Mountain Bike Route from Canada to Mexico. Cyclists dream of and plan for this life-list trip that starts in Banff, Alberta and rolls through 2,745 miles of wild mountainous beauty all the way to antelope Wells, New Mexico. Michael McCoy and the Adventure Cycling Association (ACA) provide a segmented route guide for you to follow in its entirety or section ride to suit your schedule and stamina. This fully updated edition provides the information you need to stay on route and find food, water, bike supplies, and shelter (camp or stay in small-town accommodations) over the entire adventure. Updated content in the 2nd edition includes info on the 254 miles in Canada that were recently added to the route (with maps and photos), as well as changes and additions to the evolving trail, new resources to access on your trip, and new and revised maps.
Bicycle trails

Bicycle Trails Manual

Author: Minnesota. Division of Parks and Recreation

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bicycle trails

Page: 30

View: 194

Sports & Recreation

Bicycle Transportation

Author: John Forester

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 346

View: 689

This new edition of John Forester's handbook for transportation policy makers and bicycling advocates has been completely rewritten to reflect changes of the last decade. It includes new chapters on European bikeway engineering, city planning, integration with mass transit and long-distance carriers, "traffic calming," and the art of encouraging private-sector support for bicycle commuting.A professional engineer and an avid bicyclist, John Forester combined those interests in founding the discipline of cycling transportation engineering, which regards bicycling as a form of vehicular transportation equal to any other form of transportation. Forester, who believes that riding a bicycle along streets with traffic is safer than pedaling on restricted bike paths and bike lanes, argues the case for cyclists' rights with zeal and with statistics based on experience, traffic studies, and roadway design standards. Over the nearly two decades since Bicycle Transportation was first published, he has brought about many changes in the national standards for highways, bikeways, bicycles, and traffic laws. His Effective Cycling Program continues to grow.
City planning

Highway and Freeway Planning Procedures and Criteria

Author: California. Legislature. Assembly. Interim Committee on Natural Resources, Planning, and Public Works

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: City planning

Page: 432

View: 682

Architecture

Roads Were Not Built for Cars

Author: Carlton Reid

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 376

View: 615

Cyclists were written out of highway history in the 1920s and 1930s by the all-powerful motor lobby: Roads Were Not Built For Cars tells the real story, putting cyclists center stage again. Not that the book is only about cyclists. It will also contains lots of automotive history because many automobile pioneers were cyclists before becoming motorists. A surprising number of the first car manufacturers were also cyclists, including Henry Ford. Some carried on cycling right through until the 1940s. One famous motor manufacturing pioneer was a racing tricycle rider to his dying day.