Art

British Iron Age Swords and Scabbards

Author: Ian Mathieson Stead

Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 287

View: 447

British Iron Age swords and scabbards are here catalogued in detail for the first time. They are grouped on the basis of typologies of components and are discussed with special reference to their decoration, context and chronology. Artefact studies have been neglected for many years, and this subject was last tackled in a paper published in 1950. Since then, the material available for study has tripled, from 93 to 274 items, and new archaeological discoveries include several elaborately decorated scabbards. Illustrations include 71 full pages of line drawings, while additional contributions examine the technology of some of the swords and provide a discussion of their enamelled decoration. Contents: Introduction; Typology and terminology; Group A: Swords of medium length and scabbards with open chape ends; Group B: Swords of medium length and scabbards with closed chape ends; Group C: Long swords and scabbards with campanulate mouths; Group D: Long swords and scabbards with straight mouths; Group E: Earlier swords and scabbards in the north; Group F: Later swords and scabbards in the north; Group G: Short swords in the south and the north; Group H: Swords and scabbards of mixed traditions; Discussion; Appendices; The technology of some of the swords; Weapons and fittings with enamelled decoration; The Isleworth sword: a note on the brass foils; A technical report on the Orton Meadows scabbard; The scientific examination of the Asby Scar sword and scabbard; The extraction of swords from their scabbards; Catalogue; Bibliography.
History

Iron Age Burials from Mill Hill, Deal

Author: Keith Parfitt

Publisher: British Museum Publications Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 215

View: 594

Mill Hill, in Kent, is one of the richest Iron Age cemeteries in England, with most of the burials dating from the 2nd and 1st centuries BC. This volume presents the results of excavations between 1984 and 1989 by the Dover Archaeological Unit, but also includes the republication and reassessment of earlier finds, together with detailed reports on metalwork, pottery, human and animal bones, and radiocarbon dating. Ths most significant find was of a young man buried with sword, shield, ornaments and a bronze crown on his head; the decoration of the metalwork provided more examples of Early Celtic Art than from any other grave in England.
Social Science

The Flag Fen Basin

Author: Francis Pryor

Publisher: English Heritage

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 498

View: 933

The Flag Fen Basin has been the subject of nearly continuous archaeological research since about 1900. This research sheds new light on the Neolithic landscape, on the Iron Age and Roman landscapes, and on the changing environmental conditions since the earlier Neolithic.
Social Science

The Arras Culture of Eastern Yorkshire – Celebrating the Iron Age

Author: Peter Halkon

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 749

In 1817 a group of East Yorkshire gentry opened barrows in a large Iron Age cemetery on the Yorkshire Wolds at Arras, near Market Weighton, including a remarkable burial accompanied by a chariot with two horses, which became known as the King’s Barrow. This was the third season of excavation undertaken there, producing spectacular finds including a further chariot burial and the so-called Queen’s barrow, which contained a gold ring, many glass beads and other items. These and later discoveries would lead to the naming of the Arras Culture, and the suggestion of connections with the near European continent. Since then further remarkable finds have been made in the East Yorkshire region, including 23 chariot burials, most recently at Pocklington in 2017 and 2018, where both graves contained horses, and were featured on BBC 4’s Digging for Britain series. This volume bring together papers presented by leading experts at the Royal Archaeological Institute Annual Conference, held at the Yorkshire Museum, York, in November 2017, to celebrate the bicentenary of the Arras discoveries. The remarkable Iron Age archaeology of eastern Yorkshire is set into wider context by views from Scotland, the south of England and Iron Age Western Europe. The book covers a wide variety of topics including migration, settlement and landscape, burials, experimental chariot building, finds of various kinds and reports on the major sites such as Wetwang/Garton Slack and Pocklington.
Art

Rethinking Celtic Art

Author: Duncan Garrow

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 227

Early Celtic art' - typified by the iconic shields, swords, torcs and chariot gear we can see in places such as the British Museum - has been studied in isolation from the rest of the evidence from the Iron Age. This book reintegrates the art with the archaeology, placing the finds in the context of our latest ideas about Iron Age and Romano-British society. The contributions move beyond the traditional concerns with artistic styles and continental links, to consider the material nature of objects, their social effects and their role in practices such as exchange and burial. The aesthetic impact of decorated metalwork, metal composition and manufacturing, dating and regional differences within Britain all receive coverage. The book gives us a new understanding of some of the most ornate and complex objects ever found in Britain, artefacts that condense and embody many histories.
History

Collectanea Antiqua

Author: Sonia Chadwick Hawkes

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 166

View: 713

This collection of essays brings together some of the biggest names in British archaeology to pay tribute to Sonia Chadwick Hawkes. The bulk of the essays are, as one might expect on Anglo-Saxon archaeology, culture and society, amny of them on sites in Kent, with a section on antiquarianism and collecting, and a section looking back at the life and career of Sonia Chadwick Hawkes.
Archaeology

Proceedings

Author: Society of Antiquaries of London

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Archaeology

Page:

View: 171

History

Celts from Antiquity

Author: Gillian Carr

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 221

Twenty-five papers focusing on the Celts. Subjects include: the debate over Celtic identity (Kraft, the Megaws, Collis and James); key discoveries (eg Eittnauer Horn, Manching, ix, Hochdorf) and reinterpretations in continental archaeology (Ralston and Bergquist/Taylor); fieldwork and debate in the southern British Iron Age (from Hawkes and Wheeler to Evans and McOmish); fieldwork and debate in the Scottish Iron Age (from Mackie to Sharples). Each section is introduced with an overview and personal perspective from the editors, setting the papers within the context of current trends in archaeology.
Celts

Britain and the Celtic Iron Age

Author: Simon James

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Celts

Page: 90

View: 830

The Celts are seen as a family of European peoples who spoke related languages and shared many things in common, from art to aspects of religion and social organization. Was the British Iron Age simply part of this supposedly uniform, Celtic world, or was it something much more distinctive, complex, strange and fascinating than we have been led to believe? New research is promoting reappraisals of Britain's prehistory, in ways which challenge many ideas, such as that of a familiar Celtic past.
Ireland

The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Author: Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ireland

Page:

View: 133

Index of archaeological papers published in 1891, under the direction of the Congress of Archaeological Societies in union with the Society of Antiquaries.