Architecture

Building Modern Turkey

Author: Zeynep Kezer

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 352

View: 601

Building Modern Turkey offers a critical account of how the built environment mediated Turkey’s transition from a pluralistic (multiethnic and multireligious) empire into a modern, homogenized nation-state following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire at the end of World War I. Zeynep Kezer argues that the deliberate dismantling of ethnic and religious enclaves and the spatial practices that ensued were as integral to conjuring up a sense of national unity and facilitating the operations of a modern nation-state as were the creation of a new capital, Ankara, and other sites and services that embodied a new modern way of life. The book breaks new ground by examining both the creative and destructive forces at play in the making of modern Turkey and by addressing the overwhelming frictions during this profound transformation and their long-term consequences. By considering spatial transformations at different scales—from the experience of the individual self in space to that of international geopolitical disputes—Kezer also illuminates the concrete and performative dimensions of fortifying a political ideology, one that instills in the population a sense of membership in and allegiance to the nation above all competing loyalties and ensures its longevity.
Architecture

Modernism and Nation Building

Author: Sibel Bozdogan

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 380

View: 546

A cultural history of modern Turkish architecture and its connections to European modernism.
Political Science

Nation-Building in Modern Turkey

Author: Alexandros Lamprou

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 214

From 1924 to 1946 the Republic of Turkey was in effect ruled as an authoritarian single-party regime. During these years the state embarked upon an extensive reform programme of modernization and nation-building. The Kemalist reform movement has been extensively studied in its institutional dimensions as a state project of top-down reform; however, Nation-Building in Modern Turkey offers a fresh look at these formative years of the Turkish state. It studies modernist nation-building and state-society relations from a novel perspective through the study of the People's House, an institution aiming at the propagation of the modernist reforms to Turkey's urban population in the 1930s and 1940s. Using previously unpublished archival material and provincial publications, this work offers an alternative understanding of social change and state-society relations. In shifting the focus from the state as the fulcrum of change to the population's participation in the process, this book offers a 'peripheral' perspective of social change as it fashions a view from provincial towns. Focusing on everyday people, it explores their participation in and experience of the new habits and mixed-gender socialization practices the modernist state was introducing in the People's Houses, such as theatre, concerts, sports, dancing balls and village excursions. By analysing hundreds of petitions and complaint letters from the provinces, Alexandros Lamprou is able to examine the multiple ways ordinary people experienced, negotiated and resisted the reforms and to consider the ramifi cations of this process for the shaping of social and collective identities. Nation-Building in Modern Turkey will be essential reading for not only students and scholars of nation-building, socio-cultural change and state society-relations in Turkey, but also of the history, sociology, political science and anthropology of Turkey and the modern Middle East.
Architecture

Modern Turkish Architecture

Author: Renata Holod

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 192

View: 306

Essays examine the development of the architecture of Turkey during the twentieth century and discuss changes in the Turkish architectural profession
History

History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey: Volume 2, Reform, Revolution, and Republic: The Rise of Modern Turkey 1808-1975

Author: Stanford J. Shaw

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 548

View: 525

Reform, Revolution and Republic: The Rise of Modern Turkey, 1808-1975 is the second book of the two-volume History of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey. It discusses the modernization of the Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the spread of nationalism among its subject peoples, and the revolutionary changes in Ottoman institutions and society that led to the Empire's demise and the rise of the democratic Republic of Turkey. Based on extensive research in the Ottoman archives as well as Western sources, this volume analyzes the external pressures, reform measures, institutional changes, and intellectual movements that affected the heterogeneous Ottoman society during the Empire's last century. It concludes with an analysis of contemporary Turkey's constitutional and political structures and principal domestic and foreign problems.
History

Heroin, Organized Crime, and the Making of Modern Turkey

Author: Ryan Gingeras

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 319

View: 279

Heroin, Organized Crime, and the Making of Modern Turkey explores the history of organized crime in Turkey and the roles which gangs and gangsters have played in the making of the Turkish state and Turkish politics. Turkey's underworld, which has been at the heart of several devastating scandals over the last several decades, is strongly tied to the country's long history of opium production and heroin trafficking. As an industry at the centre of the Ottoman Empire's long transition into the modern Turkish Republic, as important as the silk road had been in earlier centuries, the modern rise of the opium and heroin trade helped to solidify and complicate long-standing relationships between state officials and criminal syndicates. Such relationships produced not only ongoing patterns of corruption, but helped fuel and enable repeated acts of state violence. Drawing upon new archival sources from the United States and Turkey, including declassified documents from the Prime Minister's Archives of the Republic of Turkey and the Central Intelligence Agency, Heroin, Organized Crime, and the Making of Modern Turkey provides a critical window into how a handful of criminal syndicates played supporting roles in the making of national security politics in the contemporary Turkey. The rise of the 'Turkish mafia', from its origins in the late Ottoman period to its role in the 'deep state' revealed by the so-called Susurluk and Ergenekon scandals, is a story that mirrors troubling elements in the republic's establishment and emphasizes the transnational and comparative significance of narcotics and gangs in the country's past.
History

The Routledge Handbook of Modern Turkey

Author: Metin Heper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 583

In recent years, there has been growing interest in Turkey, stemming from the country’s developing role in regional and global politics, its expanding economic strength, and its identity as a predominantly Muslim country with secular political institutions and democratic processes. This Handbook provides a comprehensive and wide-ranging profile of modern Turkey. Bringing together original contributions from leading scholars with a wide range of backgrounds, this important reference work gives a unique in-depth survey of Turkish affairs, past and present. Thematically organised sections cover: Turkish history from the early Ottoman period to the present Turkish culture Politics and international relations Social issues Geography The Turkish economy and economics Presenting diverse and often competing views on all aspects of Turkish history, politics, society, culture, geography, and economics, this handbook will be an essential reference tool for students and scholars of Middle East studies, comparative politics, and culture and society.
Art

Italian Architects and Builders in the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey

Author: Paolo Girardelli

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 301

View: 509

This volume represents the first scholarly work in English devoted to the experience of Italian architects and builders in Turkey, as well as in many of the lands once belonging to the Ottoman Empire. Covering a complex cultural and political geography spanning from the Danubian principalities (today’s Romania) to Anatolia and the Aegean region, the book is the result of individual research experiences that were brought together and debated in an international conference in Istanbul in March 2013, organized in collaboration with the Italian Institute of Culture and Boğaziçi University. Grounded on a flexible notion of identitarian boundaries, the book explores a rich transcultural field of encounters and interactions, analyzed and evaluated by scholars from six different countries on the basis of hitherto uncovered archival materials. Forms, ideas, individual mobility of actors and materials, networks of patronage, material and political constraints, and religious and cultural difference all play a significant role in shaping the landscapes, buildings and architectural projects presented and discussed here. From late 18th and early 19th century experiences of interaction between neo-classical backgrounds and westernizing Ottoman forms to the Italian proposals for a Turkish republican iconic landmark like the Ataturk mausoleum in Ankara; from the design of the first Ottoman university building to Ottoman varieties of Art Nouveau and Art Deco, and to the infrastructures and urban developments of the 1950s in Turkey, the book is both a richly illustrated and documented overview of relevant cases, and a critical introduction to one of the most enticing areas of encounter in the global history of 19th and 20th century architecture and design.
History

Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey

Author: Sibel Bozdogan

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 980

In the first two decades after W.W.II, social scientist heralded Turkey as an exemplar of a 'modernizing' nation in the Western mold. Images of unveiled women working next to clean-shaven men, healthy children in school uniforms, and downtown Ankara's modern architecture all proclaimed the country's success. Although Turkey's modernization began in the late Ottoman era, the establishment of the secular nation-state by Kemal Ataturk in 1923 marked the crystallization of an explicit, elite-driven 'project of modernity' that took its inspiration exclusively from the West. The essays in this book are the first attempt to examine the Turkish experiment with modernity from a broad, interdisciplinary perspective, encompassing the fields of history, the social sciences, the humanities, architecture, and urban planning. As they examine both the Turkish project of modernity and its critics, the contributors offer a fresh, balanced understanding of dilemmas now facing not only Turkey but also many other parts of the Middle East and the world at large.
Political Science

Nation-Building and Turkish Modernization

Author: Rasim Özgür Dönmez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 276

View: 642

This book analyzes the nation building process in Turkey from a socio-historical perspective. Authors compare the nation-building process in the Republic period with the pro-Islamists of the JDP period.
History

Turkey

Author: Erik J. Zürcher

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 418

View: 138

Building upon and updating its twin themes, this revised edition focuses on Turkey's continuing incorporation into the capitalist world and the modernization of state and society.
History

Religion, Society, and Modernity in Turkey

Author: Serif Mardin

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 521

This book collects Serif Mardin’s seminal essays written throughout the span of his prolific career. Comprising some of the author’s finest and most incisive writings, these essays deal with the historical background, political travails, and socioeconomic metamorphosis of Turkey during a century of modernization. With his characteristic sophistication and breadth of vision, Mardin provides readers with a remarkably objective analysis of ideology, civil society, religion, urban life, and violence in late Ottoman and Republican Turkey. Mardin moves easily from sociological topics on violence and class-consciousness to the history of the Ottoman Empire, and the philosophy and culture of modern Turkey within the greater Middle East. These influential pieces—collected for the first time in one volume—represent an invaluable addition to the field of Middle East studies.
History

The Foreign Policy of Modern Turkey

Author: Ozgur Tufekci

Publisher: I.B. Tauris

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 828

In the last three decades, Turkey has attempted to build close relationships with Russia, Iran and the Turkic World. As a result, there has been ongoing debate about the extent to which Turkey's international relations axis is shifting eastwards. Ozgur Tufekci argues that Eurasianist ideology has been fundamental to Turkish foreign policy and continues to have influence today. The author first explores the historical roots of Eurasianism in the 19th century, comparing this to Neo-Eurasianism and Pan-Slavism. The Ozal era (1983-1993), the Cem era (1997-2002) and Davutoglu era (since 2003) are then examined to reveal how foreign policy making has been informed by discourses of Eurasianism, and how Eurasianist ideas were implemented through internal and external socio-economic and political factors.
Political Science

Modern Turkey

Author: Bill Park

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 227

This exciting new textbook provides a broad and comprehensive overview of contemporary Turkey. Placing the country and its people within the context of a rapidly globalizing world, the book covers a diverse range of themes such as politics, economics, international relations, the Turkic world, religion and recent historical background. Tracing the evolution of Turkey’s domestic political and economic systems, and its foreign policy, from the inception of the republic to the present day, the themes covered include: the impact of globalization on Turkey’s society, politics, economy and foreign policy the role of the EU and the Turkish diaspora in the evolution of Turkish policies the main features and prominent role of Kemalism turkish foreign policy, and the new challenges and opportunities brought by the end of the cold war the position of Turkey as a ‘bridge’ between East and West, and the particular and unique dilemmas confronting a Muslim but economically developed, democratized state allied to the West Kurdish identity the Fethullah Gulen movement and the Armenian ‘genocide’. Situating the country as a ‘model’ for the wider Muslim world, this sophisticated analysis of one of the largest and most important states in the Middle East will be an invaluable resource for scholars and officials interested in Turkish politics and US foreign and security policies, and for students of the Balkan, Middle Eastern, Caucasus and Central Asian regions.
Business & Economics

Nation Building, State Building, and Economic Development: Case Studies and Comparisons

Author: Sarah C.M. Paine

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 344

View: 387

Why do some countries remain poor and dysfunctional while others thrive and become affluent? The expert contributors to this volume seek to identify reasons why prosperity has increased rapidly in some countries but not others by constructing and comparing cases. The case studies focus on the processes of nation building, state building, and economic development in comparably situated countries over the past hundred years. Part I considers the colonial legacy of India, Algeria, the Philippines, and Manchuria. In Part II, the analysis shifts to the anticolonial development strategies of Soviet Russia, Ataturk's Turkey, Mao's China, and Nasser's Egypt. Part III is devoted to paired cases, in which ostensibly similar environments yielded very different outcomes: Haiti and the Dominican Republic; Jordan and Israel; the Republic of the Congo and neighboring Gabon; North Korea and South Korea; and, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. All the studies examine the combined constraints and opportunities facing policy makers, their policy objectives, and the effectiveness of their strategies. The concluding chapter distills what these cases can tell us about successful development - with findings that do not validate the conventional wisdom.
Religion

Islam in Modern Turkey

Author: Sukran Vahide

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 440

View: 245

A biography of the prominent Turkish theologian and thinker.
History

The Making of Modern Turkey

Author: Ugur Ümit Üngör

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 873

The eastern provinces of the Ottoman Empire used to be a multi-ethnic region where Armenians, Kurds, Syriacs, Turks, and Arabs lived together in the same villages and cities. The disintegration of the Ottoman Empire and rise of the nation state violently altered this situation. Nationalist elites intervened in heterogeneous populations they identified as objects of knowledge, management, and change. These often violent processes of state formation destroyed historical regions and emptied multicultural cities, clearing the way for modern nation states. The Making of Modern Turkey highlights how the Young Turk regime, from 1913 to 1950, subjected Eastern Turkey to various forms of nationalist population policies aimed at ethnically homogenizing the region and incorporating it in the Turkish nation state. It examines how the regime utilized technologies of social engineering, such as physical destruction, deportation, spatial planning, forced assimilation, and memory politics, to increase ethnic and cultural homogeneity within the nation state. Drawing on secret files and unexamined records, Ugur Ümit Üngör demonstrates that concerns of state security, ethnocultural identity, and national purity were behind these policies. The eastern provinces, the heartland of Armenian and Kurdish life, became an epicenter of Young Turk population policies and the theatre of unprecedented levels of mass violence.
History

Party Building in the Modern Middle East

Author: Michele Penner Angrist

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 216

Why was Turkey - alone of all the modern states that emerged from the Ottoman Empire - the only Middle Eastern country to evolve lasting competitive political institutions? While democratic processes grew steadily in Turkey during the twentieth century, its neighbors turned to forms of authoritarian rule that reinforced the powers of armies, families, single parties, or monarchs. Michele Angrist argues that democracy and dictatorship in the Middle East can be understood by studying the nature and status of political parties operating at the moment of independence. Looking carefully at Muslim-majority states where parties played a crucial role in state formation between the 1940s and the 1960s, Angrist challenges the idea that Islam, class structures, levels of development, and/or international factors dominated domestic politics in the region. She writes across the regional divides that have isolated Turkish, Arab, and Persian studies from each other. Comparative political scientists, Middle East social scientists, and scholars of Turkey will find here a compelling account of party building and democratization in the modern Middle East.