History

Canada's First Nations

Author: Olive Patricia Dickason

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 591

View: 796

Designed to provide a comprehensive introduction into the subject. Interdisciplinary approach, incorporating insights from archeology, anthropology, biology, sociology, and political science, adds depth as well as breadth.
History

A Concise History of Canada's First Nations

Author: Olive Patricia Dickason

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 387

View: 610

A Concise History of Canada's First Nations is a concise version of thebestselling history of Canada's original inhabitants, Indians, Inuit, and Metis.Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines the techniques from history,anthropology, and archaeology, Dickason and Calder trace the history of the morethan 50 First Nations in the territory that is now Canada, beginning with thearrival of people in North America across the Bering Strait many thousands ofyears ago.
Education

First Nations Education in Canada

Author: Marie Ann Battiste

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 355

View: 607

"Indian education", although difficult to define, is a significant process to all Aboriginal parents and communities. It firmly raises the issue of humanity: What does it mean to be an Aboriginal person? It addresses the paramount issues of education in a multicultural state: What should education achieve for Aboriginal peoples?
Social Science

First Nations Gaming in Canada

Author: Yale D. Belanger

Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 122

While games of chance have been part of the Aboriginal cultural landscape since before European contact, large-scale commercial gaming facilities within First Nations communities are a relatively new phenomenon in Canada. First Nations Gaming in Canada is the first multidisciplinary study of the role of gaming in indigenous communities north of the 49th parallel. Bringing together some of Canada’s leading gambling researchers, the book examines the history of Aboriginal gaming and its role in indigenous political economy, the rise of large-scale casinos and cybergaming, the socio-ecological impact of problem gambling, and the challenges of labour unions and financial management. The authors also call attention to the dearth of socio-economic impact studies of gambling in First Nations communities while providing models to address this growing issue of concern.
Political Science

First Nations? Second Thoughts

Author: Thomas Flanagan

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 245

View: 785

Dissects the prevailing orthodoxy determining public policy toward Canada's aboriginal peoples, an orthodoxy holding that aboriginals belong to "nations" entitled to specific rights. For example, Indians and Inuit now have rights to self-government, immunity from taxation, hunting and fishing rights beyond those of other citizens, free education, housing and medical care. Flanagan (political science, U. of Alberta) argues that such benefits are actually destructive to the people they are supposed to help and that the only people empowered by such entitlements are a small elite of aboriginal activists, politicians, administrators, middlemen, and well-connected entrepreneurs. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Autochtones

First Peoples in Canada

Author: Alan Daniel McMillan

Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

ISBN:

Category: Autochtones

Page: 387

View: 600

Since Native Peoples and Cultures of Canada was first published in 1988, its two editions have sold some 30,000 copies, and it is widely used as the basic text in colleges and universities across the country. Now retitled, this comprehensive book still provides an overview of all the Aboriginal groups in Canada. Incorporating the latest research in anthropology, archaeology, ethnography and history, this new edition describes traditional ways of life, traces cultural changes that resulted from contacts with the Europeans, and examines the controversial issues of land claims and self-government that now affect Aboriginal societies. Most importantly, this generously illustrated edition incorporates a Nativist perspective in the analysis of Aboriginal cultures.
Autochtones - Canada

Full Circle

Author: John Steckley

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Autochtones - Canada

Page: 274

View: 107

This book examines both traditional and contemporary aboriginal societies in Canada reflecting the diversity of First Nation’s voices. Through discussions of aboriginal languages, oral tradition, writers, and individuals, the content touches on several issues such as colonialism, education, health, justice and social action.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Before Canada

Author: Sheila Nelson

Publisher: Mason Crest Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 87

View: 371

Discusses the geographic regions of Canada and the cultures of the First Nations who lived there and explores some of the theories about how people first came to North America, as well as theories about early European visitors to Canada.
Juvenile Nonfiction

The Kids Book of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Author: Diane Silvey

Publisher: Kids Can Press Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 63

View: 942

Introduces the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, describing their social life, customs, and history.
Political Science

Time Bomb

Author: Douglas L. Bland

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 152

View: 756

A look at how a major confrontation between Canada and the First Nations could erupt, and how it might be prevented. There are few greater tragedies than a war waged by a society against itself. As Time Bomb shows, a catastrophic confrontation between Canada’s so-called “settler” and First Nations communities is not only feasible, it is, in theory, inevitable. Grievances, prejudice, and other factors all combine to make the likelihood of a First Nations uprising very real. Time Bomb describes how a nationwide insurgency could unfold, how the "usual" police and military reactions to First Nations protests would only worsen such a situation, and how, on the other hand, innovative policies might defuse the smouldering time bomb in our midst. The question all Canadians and First Nations must answer is this: Must we all suffer the disaster of a great national insurgency or will we act together to extinguish the growing danger in our midst?
History

Mixed Blessings

Author: Tolly Bradford

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 943

Mixed Blessings transforms our understanding of the relationship between Indigenous people and Christianity in Canada from the early 1600s to the present day. While acknowledging the harm of colonialism, including the trauma inflicted by church-run residential schools, this interdisciplinary collection challenges the portrayal of Indigenous people as passive victims of malevolent missionaries who experienced a uniformly dark history. Instead, this book illuminates the diverse and multifaceted ways that Indigenous communities and individuals - including prominent leaders such as Louis Riel and Edward Ahenakew - have interacted, and continue to interact, meaningfully with Christianity.
Autochtones / Canada / Biographies

Full Circle

Author: John Steckley

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN:

Category: Autochtones / Canada / Biographies

Page: 288

View: 802

Full Circle is appropriate for college and university courses in Anthropology, Sociology, Native Studies and Canadian Studies departments. Using a 'native-centric" voice, the text takes a modern and multidisciplinary approach, providing historical, geographical and cultural background before reviewing the current state of affairs of first nations peoples in Canada. It provides a concise overview of all native groups, including Innuit and Metis, and explores recent developments in the political, environmental, and legal areas. This revised edition includes up-to-date ethnographic data and deals with some pressing health-related issues of growing concern.

Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Author: James S. Frideres

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 160

View: 479

James S. Frideres' introduction to the current status of First Nations peoples considers often troubled relations with the federal government as well as their surprising resilience. Frideres' surveys pre- and post-contact and ends with recent court challenges; in spite of historical trauma anda century of extinguishment policies, First Nations people are flourishing across Canada. Frideres shows that understanding decades of misguided government policy helps make sense of sobering present indicators of health and welfare.This fascinating assessment draws on all the most recent and most reliable data of First Nations peoples across Canada, both on reserve and in urban centres. The first chapter is a concise, accessible description of First Nations populations before and following contact with European settlers, whereonce thriving healthy nations across the country faced decimation from imported disease and cultural change. The history of government attempts to "manage" First Nations people via the Indian Act, treaties, and other forms of legislation dispossessed them of land, livelihood, and identity. Today,First Nations people continue to live with the effects of these misguided policies, too often isolated and marginalized from the rest of Canada. Chapters consider all the key indicators in their historical context, including education, health, and criminal justice. Two chapters also deal with theissue of rights: land rights and Aboriginal rights, both complicated topics that emerge from different cultural worldviews. As rights legislation evolves however, new opportunities for reconciliation have emerged.This accessible and up-to-date account of social demographics will be essential reading for students and scholars wishing to understand the full context of First Nations people in Canada.
Social Science

First Nations, First Thoughts

Author: Annis May Timpson

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 280

Countless books and articles have traced the impact of colonialism and public policy on Canada's First Nations, but few have explored the impact of Aboriginal thought on public discourse and policy development in Canada. First Nations, First Thoughts brings together Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal scholars who cut through the prevailing orthodoxy to reveal Indigenous thinkers and activists as a pervasive presence in diverse political, constitutional, and cultural debates and arenas, including urban spaces, historical texts, public policy, and cultural heritage preservation. This innovative, thought-provoking collection contributes to the decolonization process by encouraging us to imagine a stronger, fairer Canada in which Aboriginal self-government and expression can be fully realized.
Photography

Classic Images of Canada's First Nations

Author: Edward Cavell

Publisher: Heritage House Publishing Co

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 95

View: 833

Of great historical and aesthetic interest, this amazing collection of photographs captures the diversity and dignity of Canada's First Nations during a time of tumultuous change. Assembled by Edward Cavell, a former curator of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in Banff, Alberta, the photographs span the period from the infancy of the art form in the 1850s to the more sophisticated technology of 1920. The poignant and beautiful record of First Nations people and their culture, as seen through the eyes of talented photographers, is a fascinating glimpse into Canada's past.
Education

Indigenous Writes

Author: Chelsea Vowel

Publisher: Highwater Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 240

View: 193

In Indigenous Writes, Chelsea Vowel, legal scholar, teacher, and intellectual, opens an important dialogue about the wider social beliefs associated with the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada. In 31 essays, Chelsea explores the Indigenous experience from the time of contact to the present, through five categories--Terminology of Relationships; Culture and Identity; Myth-Busting; State Violence; and Land, Learning, Law, and Treaties. She answers the questions that many people have on these topics to spark further conversations at home, in the classroom, and in the larger community.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Righting Canada's Wrongs: Residential Schools

Author: Melanie Florence

Publisher: James Lorimer & Company

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 128

View: 643

Canada's residential school system for aboriginal young people is now recognized as a grievous historic wrong committed against First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples. This book documents this subject in a format that will give all young people access to this painful part of Canadian history. In 1857, the Gradual Civilization Act was passed by the Legislature of the Province of Canada with the aim of assimilating First Nations people. In 1879, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald commissioned the "Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-Breeds." This report led to native residential schools across Canada. First Nations and Inuit children aged seven to fifteen years old were taken from their families, sometimes by force, and sent to residential schools where they were made to abandon their culture. They were dressed in uniforms, their hair was cut, they were forbidden to speak their native language, and they were often subjected to physical and psychological abuse. The schools were run by the churches and funded by the federal government. About 150,000 aboriginal children went to 130 residential schools across Canada. The last federally funded residential school closed in 1996 in Saskatchewan. The horrors that many children endured at residential schools did not go away. It took decades for people to speak out, but with the support of the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations, former residential school students took the federal government and the churches to court. Their cases led to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the largest class-action settlement in Canadian history. In 2008, Prime Minister Harper formally apologized to former native residential school students for the atrocities they suffered and the role the government played in setting up the school system. The agreement included the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which has since worked to document this experience and toward reconciliation. Through historical photographs, documents, and first-person narratives from First Nations, Inuit, and Metis people who survived residential schools, this book offers an account of the injustice of this period in Canadian history. It documents how this official racism was confronted and finally acknowledged.