Literary Criticism

Racial Attitudes in English-Canadian Fiction, 1905-1980

Author: Terrence Craig

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 170

View: 238

Racial Attitudes in English-Canadian Fiction is a critical overview of the appearances and consequences of racism in English-Canadian fiction published between 1905 and 1980. Based on an analysis of traditional expressions in literature of group solidarity and resentment, the study screens English-Canadian novels for fictional representations of such feelings. Beginning with the English-Canadian reaction to the mass influx of immigrants into Western Canada after World War One, it examines the fiction of novelists such as Ralph Connor and Nellie McClung. The author then suggests that the cumulative effect of a number of individual voices, such as Grove and Salverson, constituted a counter-reaction which has been made more positive by Laurence, Lysenko, Richler and Clarke. The “debate” between these two sides, carried on in fictional and non-fictional writing, is seen to be in part resolved in synthesis after World War Two, as attitudes are forced by wartime alliances and intellectual pressures into a qualified liberalism. The author shows how single novels by Graham, Bodsworth, and Callaghan demonstrated a new concern for the exposure and eradication of racial discrimination, an attitude taken further by the works of Wiebe and Klein. The book concentrates on single texts that best portray deliberately or not, racist ideology or anti-racist arguments, and attempts to explain the arousal in Canada of such ideas.
Literary Criticism

Postmodern Canadian Fiction and the Rhetoric of Authority

Author: Glenn Deer

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 145

View: 488

Criticism that takes an ideological approach to Canadian writing is scarce; political-rhetorical studies are even more uncommon. In this original approach to postwar Canadian fiction Glenn Deer presents provocative readings of ideologies as well as experiments with authorial stances.
Literary Criticism

Modern Realism in English-Canadian Fiction

Author: Colin Hill

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 286

View: 178

Much of the scholarship on twentieth-century Canadian literature has argued that English-Canadian fiction was plagued by backwardness and an inability to engage fully with the movement of modernism that was so prevalent in British and American fiction and poetry. Modern Realism in English-Canadian Fiction re-evaluates Canadian literary culture to posit that it has been misunderstood because it is a distinct genre, a regional form of the larger international modernist movement. Examining literary magazines, manifestos, archival documents, and major writers such as Frederick Philip Grove, Morley Callaghan, and Raymond Knister, Colin Hill identifies a 'modern realism' that crosses regions as well as urban and rural divides. A bold reading of the modern-realist aesthetic and an articulate challenge to several enduring and limiting myths about Canadian writing, Modern Realism in English- Canadian Fiction will stimulate important debate in literary circles everywhere.
Literary Criticism

Memory and Identity in Canadian Fiction

Author: Sharon Selby

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 674

Covering the works of Canadian authors Alistair Macleod, Michael Ondaatje, Jane Urquhart, Margaret Atwood and Drew Hayden Taylor, the author explores how the themes of memory, storytelling and identity develop in their fiction. For the narrative voices in these works, the past is embedded in the present and a wider cultural history is written over with personal significance. The act of storytelling shapes the characters' lives, letting them rewrite the past and be haunted by it. Storytelling becomes an existential act of everyday connection among ordinary people and daily (often unrecognized) acts of heroism.
Literary Criticism

Rewriting Apocalypse in Canadian Fiction

Author: Marlene Goldman

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 701

Rewriting Apocalypse in Contemporary Canadian Fiction is the first book to explore the literary, psychological, political, and cultural repercussions of the apocalypse in the fiction of Timothy Finley, Michael Ondaatje, Margaret Atwood, Thomas King, and Joy Kogawa. While writers from diverse nations have adopted and adapted the biblical narrative, these Canadian authors introduce particular twists to the familiar myth of the end. Goldman demonstrates that they share a marked concern with purgation of the non-elect, the loss experienced by the non-elect, and the traumatic impact of apocalyptic violence. She also analyzes Canadian apocalyptic accounts as crisis literature written in the context of the Cold War - written against the fear of total destruction.
Literary Criticism

The Routledge Concise History of Canadian Literature

Author: Richard J. Lane

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 863

The Routledge Concise History of Canadian Literature introduces the fiction, poetry and drama of Canada in its historical, political and cultural contexts. In this clear and structured volume, Richard Lane outlines: the history of Canadian literature from colonial times to the present key texts for Canadian First Peoples and the literature of Quebec the impact of English translation, and the Canadian immigrant experience critical themes such as landscape, ethnicity, orality, textuality, war and nationhood contemporary debate on the canon, feminism, postcoloniality, queer theory, and cultural and ethnic diversity the work of canonical and lesser-known writers from Catherine Parr Traill and Susanna Moodie to Robert Service, Maria Campbell and Douglas Coupland. Written in an engaging and accessible style and offering a glossary, maps and further reading sections, this guidebook is a crucial resource for students working in the field of Canadian Literature.
Literary Criticism

Making Babies

Author: Sandra Sabatini

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 255

View: 226

Although the infant has been a consistent figure in literature (and, for many people, a significant figure in personal life), there’s been little attention focused on infants, or on their place in Canadian fiction, until now. In this book, Sandra Sabatini examines Canadian fiction to trace the ideological charge behind the represented infant. Examining writers from L.M. Montgomery and Frederick Philip Grove to Thomas King and Terry Griggs, Sabatini compares women’s writing about babies with the way infants appear in texts by men over the course of a century. She discovers a range of changing attitudes toward babies. After being seen as a source of financial burden, social shame, or sentimental fantasy, infants have increasingly become a source of value and meaning. The book challenges the perception of babies as passive objects of care and argues for a reading of the infant as a subject in itself. It also reflects upon how the representations of infancy in Canadian literature offer an intriguing portrait of how we imagine ourselves.
Canadian literature

Canadian Literature

Author: K. Balachandran

Publisher: Sarup & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Canadian literature

Page: 230

View: 898

Literary Criticism

The Canadian Novel

Author: John Moss

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 278

A collection of essays about contemporary Canadian novels by Margaret Atwood, Robertson Davies, Margaret Laurence, Alice Munro, Mordechai Richler, Rudy Weibe, as edited by professor of English at the University of Ottawa John Moss.
Education

Challenging Addiction in Canadian Literature and Classrooms

Author: Cara Fabre

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 259

View: 298

In the richly interdisciplinary study, Challenging Addiction in Canadian Literature and Classrooms, Cara Fabre argues that popular culture in its many forms contributes to common assumptions about the causes, and personal and social implications, of addiction. Recent fictional depictions of addiction significantly refute the idea that addiction is caused by poor individual choices or solely by disease through the connections the authors draw between substance use and poverty, colonialism, and gender-based violence. With particular interest in the pervasive myth of the "Drunken Indian", Fabre asserts that these novels reimagine addiction as social suffering rather than individual pathology or moral failure. Fabre builds on the growing body of humanities research that brings literature into active engagement with other fields of study including biomedical and cognitive behavioural models of addiction, medical and health policies of harm reduction, and the practices of Alcoholics Anonymous. The book further engages with critical pedagogical strategies to teach critical awareness of stereotypes of addiction and to encourage the potential of literary analysis as a form of social activism.
Literary Criticism

Literary Research and Canadian Literature

Author: Gabriella Reznowski

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 346

This guide addresses the tools and best practices for selecting and evaluating print and electronic sources related to the extensive and varied literature of Canada. Beginning with an overview of the strategies needed to conduct online research, individual chapters examine general literary reference materials; relevant online library catalogs, including national and union library catalogs; scholarly journals; archival collections; microform and digital collections; periodicals, literary magazines, newspapers, and reviews; and Web and electronic resources. Special topics discussed include 'little magazines,' scholarly gateways, and cultural resources. The guide culminates in a chapter that illustrates the application of the strategies explored to solve a research problem. The strategies discussed within the guide are applicable to both canonical and lesser-known authors, therefore making this work relevant to anyone interested in researching Canadian literature.
Literary Criticism

Profiles in Canadian Literature 7

Author: Jeffrey M. Heath

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 168

View: 100

Profiles in Canadian Literature is a wide-ranging series of essays on Canadian authors. Each profile acquaints the reader with the writer’s work, providing insight into themes, techniques, and special characteristics, as well as a chronology of the author’s life. Finally, there is a bibliography of primary works and criticism that suggests avenues for further study. "I know of no better introduction to these writers, and the studies in question are full of basic information not readily obtainable elsewhere." -U of T Quarterly
Education

Censorship in Canadian Literature

Author: Mark Cohen

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 354

Cohen critiques Timothy Findley's broad anti-censorship position; he traces Margaret Atwood's evolution from implicit support for the censorship of pornography in Bodily Harm to the rejection of censorship in The Handmaid's Tale; and he provides the first detailed study of the draft of Margaret Laurence's unfinished novel, showing the degree to which her final silence was a result of her censorship ordeal. Finally, an analysis of the writing of Beatrice Culleton and Marlene Nourbese Philip shows how different kinds of socio-cultural censorship - from gate-keepers to self-censorship - silence Native and black Canadian voices. Cohen's re-definition of censorship as essentially a practice of judgment takes us beyond the traditional Enlightenment delineation of censorship as an oppressive government practice and the consequent neutralist liberal condemnation of censorship on principle. Since judgment is enmeshed in the fabric of human endeavour, censorship is inevitable; since censorship is inevitable, Cohen concludes, debate over whether censorship itself is desirable should give way to a search for censorship practices that are more just. Censorship in Canadian Literature is an essential text for scholars of Canadian literature as well as for anyone concerned with contemporary debates about censorship and civil rights.
Literary Criticism

When Canadian Literature Moved to New York

Author: Nicholas James Mount

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 217

View: 423

Canadian literature was born in New York City. It began not in the backwoods of Ontario or the salt flats of New Brunswick, but in the cafés, publishing offices, and boarding houses of late nineteenth-century New York, where writing developed as a profession and where the groundwork for the Canadian canon was laid. So argues Nick Mount in When Canadian Literature Moved to New York. The last decades of the nineteenth century saw an extraordinary exodus from English Canada, draining the country of half its writers and all but a few of its contemporary and future literary celebrities. Motivated by powerful obstacles to a domestic literature, most of these migrants landed in New York - by the 1890s the centre of the continental literary market - and found for the first time a large, receptive literary market and recognition from non-Canadian publishers and reviewers. While the expatriates of the 1880s and 1890s - including Bliss Carman, Ernest Thompson Seton, and Palmer Cox - were recognized for their achievements in Canada, the domestic literature they themselves spurred into existence rekindled a nationalist imperative to distinguish Canadian writing from other literatures, especially American, and this slowly eliminated most of their work from the emerging English Canadian canon. When Canadian Literature Moved to New York is the story of these expatriate writers: who they were, why they left, what they achieved, and how they changed Canadian literary history.