Comics & Graphic Novels

Cassandra Darke

Author: Posy Simmonds

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 96

View: 481

'Simmonds is a copper-bottomed genius... she is as brilliant a writer as Britain has' Jenny Colgan, Mail Online Cassandra Darke is an art dealer, mean, selfish, solitary by nature, living in Chelsea in a house worth £7 million. She has become a social pariah, but doesn’t much care. Between one Christmas and the next, she has sullied the reputation of a West End gallery and has acquired a conviction for fraud, a suspended sentence and a bank balance drained by lawsuits. On the scale of villainy, fraud seems to Cassandra a rather paltry offence – her own crime involving ‘no violence, no weapon, no dead body’. But in Cassandra’s basement, her young ex-lodger, Nicki, has left a surprise, something which implies at least violence and probably a body . . . Something which forces Cassandra out of her rich enclave and onto the streets. Not those local streets paved with gold and lit with festive glitter, but grimmer, darker places, where she must make the choice between self-sacrifice and running for her life.
Drama

Nine Greek Dramas by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes

Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 472

View: 676

Author names not noted above: Euripides and Aristophanes. Translator names not noted above: E.D.A. Morshead, E.H. Plumtre, Gilbert Murray, and B.B. Rogers. Originally published between 1909 and 1917 under the name "Harvard Classics," this stupendous 51-volume set-a collection of the greatest writings from literature, philosophy, history, and mythology-was assembled by American academic CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834-1926), Harvard University's longest-serving president. Also known as "Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf," it represented Eliot's belief that a basic liberal education could be gleaned by reading from an anthology of works that could fit on five feet of bookshelf. Volume VIII features nine plays by the greatest of the Greek dramatists: [ from AESCHYLUS (c. 525 Bic. 456 Be, the father of tragedy: Agamemnon, The Libation-Bearers, and The Furies, which constitute his trilogy known as the Oresteia; and Prometheus Bound, about the downfall of the god who gave fire to humanity [ from SOPHOCLES (c. 496 Bi406 Be: the ultimate Greek tragedy, Oedipus the King, as well as Antigone, still regularly performed today [ from EURIPIDES (c. 480 Bi406 Be: Hippolytus, based on the legend of the son of Theseus, the founder of Athens, and The Bacchae, the story of a king who refused to worship the god Dionysus [ from Aristophanes (c. 446 Bic. 386 Be, the father of comedy: The Frogs, a political satire featuring the god Dionysus.
Drama

The Oresteia

Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 119

View: 530

Aeschylus was the first of the three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays can still be read or performed, the others being Sophocles and Euripides. He is often described as the father of tragedy: our knowledge of the genre begins with his work and our understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. Only seven of his estimated seventy to ninety plays have survived into modern times. Fragments of some other plays have survived in quotes and more continue to be discovered on Egyptian papyrus, often giving us surprising insights into his work.
Fiction

The Masqueraders Series

Author: Laura Parker

Publisher: Diversion Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1800

View: 764

Five scorching-hot, suspense-filled, historical romances from “a most inventive storyteller” where deceit hides forbidden love—until the disguises come off (RT Book Reviews). In Caprice, a young widow decides on a lark to disguises herself as the mysterious Princess Soltana El Djemal—only to catch the heart of a dashing Lord who vows to discover her true identity. In Mischief, a bold young woman falls for an infamous spy while escaping Persia in 1808, but it’s when she sees him again in England that the real adventure begins. In Beguiled, a mysterious man and a desperate heiress set out to con the upper crust of nineteenth century New York—but the games they’re playing against each other are far more dangerous. In Emerald and Sapphire, a French nobleman’s secret double life as a thief is revealed—by the only woman capable of stealing his heart. And in The Gamble, a viscount masquerades as a notorious highwayman, only to discover that a woman’s heart is the hardest jewel to steal. “Laura Parker’s innovativeness and beautiful style of writing keep her a head above the rest.” —Affaire de Coeur
Literary Criticism

Gypsies and the British Imagination, 1807-1930

Author: Deborah Epstein Nord

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 815

Gypsies and the British Imagination, 1807-1930, is the first book to explore fully the British obsession with Gypsies throughout the nineteenth century and into the twentieth. Deborah Epstein Nord traces various representations of Gypsies in the works of such well-known British authors John Clare, Walter Scott, William Wordsworth, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, and D. H. Lawrence. Nord also exhumes lesser-known literary, ethnographic, and historical texts, exploring the fascinating histories of nomadic writer George Borrow, the Gypsy Lore Society, Dora Yates, and other rarely examined figures and institutions. Gypsies were both idealized and reviled by Victorian and early-twentieth-century Britons. Associated with primitive desires, lawlessness, cunning, and sexual excess, Gypsies were also objects of antiquarian, literary, and anthropological interest. As Nord demonstrates, British writers and artists drew on Gypsy characters and plots to redefine and reconstruct cultural and racial difference, national and personal identity, and the individual's relationship to social and sexual orthodoxies. Gypsies were long associated with pastoral conventions and, in the nineteenth century, came to stand in for the ancient British past. Using myths of switched babies, Gypsy kidnappings, and the Gypsies' murky origins, authors projected onto Gypsies their own desires to escape convention and their anxieties about the ambiguities of identity. The literary representations that Nord examines have their roots in the interplay between the notion of Gypsies as a separate, often despised race and the psychic or aesthetic desire to dissolve the boundary between English and Gypsy worlds. By the beginning of the twentieth century, she argues, romantic identification with Gypsies had hardened into caricature-a phenomenon reflected in D. H. Lawrence's The Virgin and the Gipsy-and thoroughly obscured the reality of Gypsy life and history.
Fiction

The Eyes Of God

Author: John Marco

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 800

View: 677

A young king breaks with the past and makes peace with the kingdom his father has fought for years. To seal the bargain he is offered the hand of the kingdom¿s princess. And so begins a fast moving epic of madness, obsession, prejudice and sheer magic. John Marco has woven an intricate tale of personalities driven by love, hatred and ambition. Each character must, in the end, pay the price for their actions and THE EYES OF GOD is, at its core, an almost classical tragedy. Rich in its evocation of magical lands, detailed in its dissection of motive, compelling it its characters, THE EYES OF GOD is the work of a natural storyteller revelling in his ability.
Fiction

Friday Mornings at Nine

Author: Marilyn Brant

Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corp.

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 947

Every woman remembers her firsts: Her first kiss. Her first lover. And her first time contemplating an affair. . . Each Friday morning at the Indigo Moon Café, Jennifer, Bridget and Tamara meet to swap stories about marriage, kids, and work. But one day, spurred by recent e-mails from her college ex, Jennifer poses questions they've never faced before. What if they all married the wrong man? What if they're living the wrong life? And what would happen if, just once, they gave in to temptation. . . Soon each woman is second-guessing the choices she's made--and the ones she can unmake--as she becomes aware of new opportunities around every corner, from attentive colleagues and sexy neighbors to flirtatious past lovers. And as fantasies blur with real life, Jennifer, Bridget and Tamara begin to realize how little they know about each other, their marriages, and themselves, and how much there is to gain--and lose--when you step outside the rules. . . Praise for Marilyn Brant's According to Jane "A warm, witty and charmingly original story." --Susan Wiggs, New York Times bestselling author "An engaging read for all who have been through the long, dark, dating wars, and still believe there's sunshine, and a Mr. Darcy, at the end of the tunnel." --Cathy Lamb, author of Henry's Sisters "This is a must-read for Austen lovers as well as for all who believe in the possibility of a happily-ever-after ending." --Holly Chamberlin, author of One Week In December