Body, Mind & Spirit

Celtic Myth and Religion

Author: Sharon Paice MacLeod

Publisher: McFarland Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 235

View: 609

"Here is a comprehensive overview of Celtic mythology and religion, encompassing numerous aspects of ritual and belief. It contains new translations of poems, prayers, inscriptions and songs from the early period (Gaulish, Old Irish and Middle Welsh) as well as the folklore tradition (Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Welsh, Cornish, Breton and Manx)"--Provided by publisher.

Celtic Mythology and the Religion of the Ancient Celts

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 108

View: 920

*Includes pictures. *Includes ancient accounts describing the Celts and their religious practices. *Includes footnotes and a bibliography. "Throughout all of Gaul there are two classes of people who are treated with dignity and honor. This does not include the common people, who are little better than slaves and never have a voice in councils. Many of these align themselves with a patron voluntarily, whether because of debt or heavy tribute or out of fear of retribution by some other powerful person. Once they do this, they have given up all rights and are scarcely better than servants. The two powerful classes mentioned above are the Druids and the warriors. Druids are concerned with religious matters, public and private sacrifices, and divination." - Julius Caesar The Celts are one of the most well-known groups in Europe and one of the least understood. Depending on which classifications are used, the Celts are also one of the oldest civilizations in Europe. In the centuries before Christ, the Celts were spread out across much of continental Europe, and though they are mostly identified with Gaul, evidence suggests they also spread as far as Portugal. Though they were spread out across Europe before the height of the Roman Empire, most people associate the Celts with the British Isles today, particularly Ireland and Scotland. After they had been relegated to those smaller regions as a result of the Romans and other migrations, the culture of the Celts as it is currently understood began to congeal during the Early Middle Ages, and Celtic culture, folklore, and legend have all become inextricably intertwined with Irish history and British history as a whole. Historically, Celtic cultures differ from their English and French neighbors in a number of ways, including social organization, language, values and economic systems, but one of the most captivating of these has always been their myths. Celtic Myths, which can be read in translation without needing special training in grammar, are more accessible than the Celtic languages, and unlike the other distinctive features that have faded over the centuries, myths still have their immediacy and power when read today. While much has undoubtedly been lost from the ancient Celts over time, medieval manuscripts help scholars understand how Celtic myths have reached the form they have today. Like many ancient belief systems, Celtic mythology shares Indo-European roots, meaning Celtic beliefs have cousins in related societies like the Norse, Greeks, Romans and Slavs, with a foundation of shared mythmaking that goes back several millennia. Descriptions of Celtic mythology by their contemporaries, including the Ancient Romans and Greeks, provide a hazy picture, while the tales recorded by Christian monks and undoubtedly bear the stamp of their own religious affiliations. Celtic Mythology: The Religion of the Ancient Celts examines the history and legacy of the religion practiced by the Ancient Celts. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about Celtic mythology like you never have before, in no time at all.
Body, Mind & Spirit

The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore

Author: Patricia Monaghan

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 529

View: 680

Presents an illustrated A to Z reference containing over 1,000 entries providing information on Celtic myths, fables and legends from Ireland, Scotland, Celtic Britain, Wales, Brittany, central France, and Galicia.
History

Celtic Mythology and the Religion of the Ancient Celts

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 62

View: 398

*Includes pictures. *Includes ancient accounts describing the Celts and their religious practices. *Includes footnotes and a bibliography. "Throughout all of Gaul there are two classes of people who are treated with dignity and honor. This does not include the common people, who are little better than slaves and never have a voice in councils. Many of these align themselves with a patron voluntarily, whether because of debt or heavy tribute or out of fear of retribution by some other powerful person. Once they do this, they have given up all rights and are scarcely better than servants. The two powerful classes mentioned above are the Druids and the warriors. Druids are concerned with religious matters, public and private sacrifices, and divination." - Julius Caesar The Celts are one of the most well-known groups in Europe and one of the least understood. Depending on which classifications are used, the Celts are also one of the oldest civilizations in Europe. In the centuries before Christ, the Celts were spread out across much of continental Europe, and though they are mostly identified with Gaul, evidence suggests they also spread as far as Portugal. Though they were spread out across Europe before the height of the Roman Empire, most people associate the Celts with the British Isles today, particularly Ireland and Scotland. After they had been relegated to those smaller regions as a result of the Romans and other migrations, the culture of the Celts as it is currently understood began to congeal during the Early Middle Ages, and Celtic culture, folklore, and legend have all become inextricably intertwined with Irish history and British history as a whole. Historically, Celtic cultures differ from their English and French neighbors in a number of ways, including social organization, language, values and economic systems, but one of the most captivating of these has always been their myths. Celtic Myths, which can be read in translation without needing special training in grammar, are more accessible than the Celtic languages, and unlike the other distinctive features that have faded over the centuries, myths still have their immediacy and power when read today. While much has undoubtedly been lost from the ancient Celts over time, medieval manuscripts help scholars understand how Celtic myths have reached the form they have today. Like many ancient belief systems, Celtic mythology shares Indo-European roots, meaning Celtic beliefs have cousins in related societies like the Norse, Greeks, Romans and Slavs, with a foundation of shared mythmaking that goes back several millennia. Descriptions of Celtic mythology by their contemporaries, including the Ancient Romans and Greeks, provide a hazy picture, while the tales recorded by Christian monks and undoubtedly bear the stamp of their own religious affiliations. Celtic Mythology: The Religion of the Ancient Celts examines the history and legacy of the religion practiced by the Ancient Celts. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about Celtic mythology like you never have before, in no time at all.

Celtic Mythology

Author: Alexander Macbain

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 136

View: 962

Macbain's "Celtic Mythology" is an interesting fusion of basic folklore, elaborate religious mythology, linguistics, and cultural development. With a focus on all things Celtic, it it particularly valuable for its analysis of language and comparison of ancient language to modern terminology.To the student of the occult this particular work is invaluable for its significant treatments on the deities of the Celts, and for its inclusion of then-modern lore often based on the same. Some of the material here is taken from the Gaelic language, among others.
Social Science

Celtic Mythology and Religion

Author: Alexander Macbain

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 284

View: 920

Excerpt from Celtic Mythology and Religion: With Chapters Upon Druid Circles and Celtic Burial The following work, all save from page 105 to the end, appeared in the Celtic Magazine in 1883-4, and is here reprinted from the Magazine type. Hence it is that it is reproduced "with all its imperfections on its head," and the critic must be asked, before condemning details at least, to note the list of corrections appended to this preface. The intention of this series of papers was to popularise the subject of Mythology, and to apply its principles to the elucidation of Celtic beliefs, tales, and traditions. I wished to place clearly before my Gaelic brethren the exact position which the religious beliefs of the Celts held in the European kinship, to clear up the misty subject of "Druidism," and to reconstruct, from the shattered materials to hand, the Pantheon of their Gaelic ancestors. This I undertook, knowing that in the last part of my object - the rehabilitation of the Gaelic Olympus - my results must only be tentative, for the material for reconstruction is difficult to deal with, and much of it is in MSS. unedited. Since these papers began to appear in print, events have travelled with more than usual rapidity both in the field of general and of Celtic Mythology. It was last year that Mr Andrew Lang delivered his lively attack against the "orthodox" school of mythologists, and it was also last year that M.D' Arbois de Jubainville's important works on Celtic Literature and Mythology appeared. Mr Lang's attack has certainly driven the older school from several of their positions, but he has by no means overthrown either the importance of language in the development of myth, or the fact that the sun, the sky, the powers of wind and storm, and the change of day and night were the most prominent factors in the creation of the deities and powers of the ancient mythologies. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Celtic Mythology

Author: Bernard Hayes

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 36

View: 464

In this book, you will find the most important facts about Celtic mythology, a people that is often overlooked or undervalued. Their tales and folklores have their routes in ancient customs and historical events, and with those backgrounds, you will get a greater understanding of the Celts. You will discover: More about the Celtic society, their religion, arts, and the collapse of that society. The Celtic history, traces of their language, and their relationship with the Romans who had conquests on the British Isles. Facts about their technology, warfare, and false stories or notions you may have heard about them. A concise outline of the Celtic gods and goddesses they worshipped and revered. Explanations about festivals and rites, as well as what they thought of cosmology and eschatology. The reason why the Celts were esteemed as one of the most terrifying societies in the world, as well as the others that made the top five. Celtic Mythology is intricate, complex, and the ideals behind their mythological beliefs were often intertwined with real life events. This book will examine how both myth and fact contributed to the culture and traditions of the Celts and how these influences and stories continue to live on throughout the centuries

Celtic Mythology and Religion

Author: Alexander MacBain

Publisher: Theclassics.Us

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 46

View: 865

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ... new land she arrives in; goes to a ball, unknown to her employers, in her fairy dress; creates a sensation, so to speak; but having to leave in haste, she loses her glass slipper, whereby the enamoured prince is enabled to find her. The tale of the "Hoodie Crow," with which our discussion commenced, would appear to be a broken down myth of the solar class; and it is accordingly connected with the nocturnal life of the sun-god, who then is under the spell of the dark powers. The dawn maiden pursues him through toils and difficulties, and at last frees him from the spells. Another fruitful source of myth and worship is the change of summer into winter, when the earth has to pass from the genial rule of the " fire" powers to that of the " frost" king. The earth is spell-bound during winter, by the machinations of the frost-king; the lovely goddess of summer has been carried away, leaving her mother Earth disconsolate; " Proserpina gathering flowers, herself a fairer flower, by gloomy Dis is gathered." She becomes the wife of Pluto, god of the lower world, but is allowed to return to her mother for half of the year. Connected with this myth is the widespread tale of the imprisoned maiden. There are always three characters in the myth; the monster or giant, who performs the abduction; the maiden who is rich in treasures as well as beautiful; and the youthful hero, the young Apollo, who is destined to overcome the monster and his spells. Some minor points may briefly be noticed. Among the many names of the sun in the Veda, he is called the "goldenhanded," a very natural simile for the golden rays shooting fingerlike from him. The Hindus accordingly rationalise this, and tell how Savitri cut off his hand in a strait, and that the priests made...
History

The Celtic and Scandinavian Religions

Author: J. A. MacCulloch

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 167

The author compares Celtic mythology and religion with the beliefs of early Scandinavian society. Vikings and Norsemen who raided British shores ruled parts of Britain for centuries. The religion of the Scandinavians was the same as the religious beliefs and practices of their fellow Teutonic and Germanic tribes and their chief deities and religious rituals were liek those of Teutonic people anywhere. .
Religion

The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore

Author: Patricia Monaghan

Publisher: Facts on File

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 512

View: 925

Examines the mythology and folklore of the peoples of Ireland, Scotland, Celtic Britain, Wales, Brittany, and central France and Galicia, covering original sources, mythical figures and heroes, themes, and sacred and historical places.
Religion

Complete Guide to Celtic Mythology

Author: Bob Curran

Publisher: Appletree PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 252

View: 662

The Celtic world is a rich source of myth and legend and this attractive volume aims to introduce the subject to a wide audience. Following a general history of Celts and druids, Curran presents extracts or summaries of myths that tell the stories of saints, giants and monsters, sea gods, earth and air spirits, sacred sites and heroes. Storytelling in the Celtic tradition is shown to be still alive in the far west of Britain. Each section is accompanied by numerous photographs of Celtic sites and past and present artistic representations of the legends.
Religion

Understanding Celtic Religion

Author:

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 232

Although it has long been acknowledged that the early Irish literary corpus preserves both pre-Christian and Christian elements, the challenges involved in the understanding of these different strata have not been subjected to critical examination. This volume draws attention to the importance of reconsidering the relationship between religion and mythology, as well as the concept of ‘Celtic religion’ itself. When scholars are attempting to construct the so-called ‘Celtic’ belief system, what counts as ‘religion’? Or, when labelling something as ‘religion’ as opposed to ‘mythology’, what do these entities entail? This volume is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles which critically reevaluates the methodological challenges of the study of ‘Celtic religion’; the authors are eminent scholars in the field of Celtic Studies representing the disciplines of theology, literary studies, history, law and archaeology, and the book represents a significant contribution to the present scholarly debate concerning the pre-Christian elements in early medieval source materials.
Fiction

The Book of Celtic Myths

Author: Adams Media

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 949

"Looks at the history, folklore, religion, and myths of the Celts who lived in Ireland"--
History

Approaches to Religion and Mythology in Celtic Studies

Author: Katja Ritari

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 996

This publication is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles focusing on religion and mythology in Celtic studies. The first part presents various current viewpoints within the field from scholars of history, art history and literary studies. In addition to more traditional approaches, the other two parts of the book illustrate the possibilities of applying new theories and methods from the discipline of Comparative Religion to the analysis of Celtic materials. They introduce previously unpublished results of the international research network The Power of Words in Traditional European Cultures, and the research project Religion, Society, and Culture: Defining the Sacred in Early Irish Literature funded by the Academy of Finland at University of Helsinki. The present collection serves as a significant contribution towards a better understanding of issues that have not been previously brought together in a single volume. As such it is of interest to scholars in Celtic studies as well as other related disciplines.
Religion

Religion(en) deuten

Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Graf

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 374

View: 779

Contemplating religion has long ceased to be the sole privilege of theology and religious studies. In cultural studies, a broad spectrum of theories and methods has developed, exploring the role of religion as an important socio-cultural factor in the modern world. This volume is a collection of contributions from history and political studies, sociology and Islamic studies, ethnology, religious studies and theology, demonstrating and interpreting these changes in research on religion.

Celtic Mythology

Author: Andrew Walsh

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 126

View: 900

CELTIC MYTHOLOGY If you're looking for a beginner's guide on Celtic culture, look no further. While this book focuses on mythology, it will also highlight other essential information about Celtic culture both in the past and present. Throughout this book, we will discuss Celtic people and the gods, goddesses, creatures, and lore that are most associated with Celtic culture. This book will also tell you about the diverse culture of Celts, where Celtic people originally came from, what makes a person Celtic, and about the Celtic religion beyond just the deities that were so important to the religion. You will also learn why these myths continue to be important for modern Celts who no longer practice the Celtic religion but still hold onto many of the Celtic traditions, as well as much, much more!