Political Science

Explaining and Influencing Chinese Arms Transfers

Author: Karl W. Eikenberry

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 65

View: 353

China's role in missile and nuclear weapons proliferation has become one of 3 issues -- along with human rights and trade -- upon which the U.S. has focused its reassessment of U.S. policy toward China, and whether to attach conditions to the renewal of China's MFN trade benefits. Addresses the factors motivating Chinese conventional arms sales and speculates on means to influence them. Describes the history of PRC weapons exports, then examines various supply- and demand-side reasons for these transfers. Discusses sources of arms transfer restraints.
Arms transfers

Fire of the Dragon

Author: Robert Bates Gill

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Arms transfers

Page: 810

View: 801

Political Science

Chinese Arms Transfers

Author: Bates Gill

Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 111

Since China's rapid growth and expansion in the international arms markets of the 1980s, no in-depth and comprehensive study has fully addressed the motives and implications of the burgeoning Chinese arms export trade. This work fills that gap in our understanding and, at the same time, sheds light on Chinese foreign policy and security goals, while considering the future of Chinese arms exports and their impact on regional security in the years ahead.

Chinese Arms Transfers

Author: BPI Information Services

Publisher: Bpi Information Services

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 72

View: 523

In July 1987, the U.S. began Persian Gulf escort operations for reflagged Kuwait tankers to guarantee safe passage through vital int'l shipping lanes threatened by the escalating Iran-Iraq War. This task was complicated for the American Navy by Iran's deployment of shore batteries of Chinese-manufactured HY-2 Silkworm anti ship missiles. Washington negotiated with Beijing, seeking to deny further anti ship missile deliveries to Teheran. However, disagreements over arms transfer issues prove a recurring source of bilateral friction. This book identifies recurring patterns in the global arms trade to put the study of China into perspective.
Armes et munitions - Chine

China and the Arms Trade

Author: Anne Gilks

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Armes et munitions - Chine

Page: 229

View: 152

Political Science

The International Arms Trade

Author: Rachel Stohl

Publisher: Polity

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 278

View: 465

"This book explores the complexities and realities of the global conventional weapons trade. It traces the history of the arms trade and examines how it has evolved since the end of the Cold War. In particular, the role of the largest arms exporters and importers and the business of selling conventional arms around the world are assessed, and new light is shed on the illicit arms trade and the shadowy dealers who profit from their deadly commerce. The book also looks closely at the devastating effect the business can have on countries, societies and individuals, and concludes with an evaluation of the various existing control strategies and the potential for future control opportunities." --Book Jacket.
Arms transfers

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 2001-2008

Author: Richard F. Grimmett

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Arms transfers

Page: 84

View: 712

Contents: (1) Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 2001-2008: Intro. and Overview; (2) General Trends in Arms Transfers Worldwide; General Trends in Arms Transfers to Developing Nations: U.S.; Russia; China; Major West European Suppliers; Regional Arms Transfer Agreements: Near East; Asia; Leading Developing Nations Arms Purchasers; Weapons Types Recently Delivered to Near East Nations; (3) Arms Values Data Tables and Charts for 2001-08; (4) Selected Weapons Deliveries to Developing Nations, 2001-08; (5) Worldwide Arms Transfer Agreements and Deliveries Values, 2001-08; (6) Description of Items Counted in Weapons Categories, 2001-08; (7) Regions Identified in Arms Transfer. Charts and tables.

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 2000-2007

Author: Richard F. Grimmett

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 75

View: 717

Contents: (1) Intro. and Overview; (2) Major Findings: (a) Trends in Arms Transfers Worldwide; (b) Trends in Arms Transfers to Developing Nations: U.S.; Russia; China; Major West European Suppliers; (c) Regional Arms Transfer Agree.: Near East; Asia; (d) Leading Developing Nations Arms Purchasers; (e) Weapons Types Recently Delivered to Near East Nations: U.S.; Russia; China; Major West European Suppliers; All Other European Suppliers; All Other Suppliers; (3) Arms Values Data Tables and Charts for 2000-07; (4) Selected Weapons Deliveries to Developing Nations, 2000-07; (5) Worldwide Arms Transfer Agree. and Deliveries Values, 2000-07; (6) Description of Items Counted in Weapons Categories, 2000-07. Charts and tables.
Political Science

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1999-2006

Author: Richard F. Grimmett

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 123

View: 399

This title contains some general data that is provided on world-wide conventional arms transfers by all suppliers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world.
Business & Economics

China's Arms Sales

Author: Daniel Byman

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 60

View: 853

Developed by the Rand Corporation, the site contains chapters covering an Introduction; Background; Explaining China's Arms Transfers; Possible Constraints on China's Arms; Implications for the United States; An Overview of China's Arms Sales; and a Bibliography.
Political Science

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1997-2004

Author: Richard F. Grimmett

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 119

View: 454

This book provides unclassified quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding eight calendar years. Some general data are provided on world-wide conventional arms transfers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world. Developing nations continue to be the primary focus of foreign arms sales activity by weapons suppliers. During the years 1997-2004, the value of arms transfer agreements with developing nations comprised 62.7% of all such agreements world-wide. More recently, arms transfer agreements with developing nations constituted 57.3% of all such agreements globally from 2001-2004, and 58.9% of these agreements in 2004. The value of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations in 2004 was nearly $21.8 billion. This was a substantial increase over 2003, and the highest total, in real terms, since 2000. In 2004, the value of all arms deliveries to developing nations was nearly $22.5 billion, the highest total in these deliveries values since 2000 (in constant 2004 dollars). Recently, from 2001-2004, the United States and Russia have dominated the arms market in the developing world, with the United States ranking first and Russia second each of the last four years in the value of arms transfer agreements. From 2001-2004, the United States made $29.8 billion in arms transfer agreements with developing nations, in constant 2004 dollars, 39.9% of all such agreements. Russia, the second leading supplier during this period, made $21.7 billion in arms transfer agreements, or 29.1%. In 2004, the United States ranked first in arms transfer agreements with developing nations with nearly $6.9 billion or 31.6% of these agreements. Russia was second with $5.9 billion or 27.1% of such agreements. In 2004, the United States ranked first in the value of arms deliveries to developing nations at nearly $9.6 billion, or 42.6% of all such deliveries. Russia ranked second at $4.5 billion or 20% of such deliveries. France ranked third at $4.2 billion or 18.7% of such deliveries. During the 2001-2004 period, China ranked first among developing nations purchasers in the value of arms transfer agreements, concluding $10.4 billion in such agreements. India ranked second at $7.9 billion. Egypt ranked third at $6.5 billion. In 2004, India ranked first in the value of arms transfer agreements among all developing nations weapons purchasers, concluding $5.7 billion in such agreements. Saudi Arabia ranked second with $2.9 billion in such agreements. China ranked third with $2.2 billion.
Law

Law and the Arms Trade

Author: Laurence Lustgarten

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 504

View: 222

This ground-breaking book offers an extensive legal analysis-grounded in public, EU, and international law-of arms trade regulation, integrated with insights drawn from international relations. The sale of weapons and related technologies is, globally, one of the most politically controversial and ethically contentious forms of commerce. Intimately connected with sustaining repressive governments and violations of international human rights and humanitarian law, arms exports are also a central element in the economic and strategic policies of the governments of all large industrial states. They have also been the source of abundant corruption, and of serious challenges to the norms and effectiveness of constitutional accountability in democratic states. On paper, the arms trade is heavily regulated: national legislation and international treaties are in place which purport to prohibit certain transactions and limit others. Yet despite its importance, legal and international relations scholarship on the subject has been surprisingly limited. This book fills this gap in the literature by examining and comparing the export control regimes of eight leading nations - USA, Russia, the UK, France, Germany, Sweden, China, and India - with chapters contributed by leading experts in the field of law and international relations.

Chinese Arms Exports

Author: Evan S. Medeiros

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 116

View: 941

It has been nearly 10 years since a comprehensive study has been undertaken to fully assess the trends, processes, and implications of China's arms exports. For a number of reasons the time is ripe for the present study to take up this subject. First, over the course of the 1990s, questions of Chinese arms proliferation emerged as a central problem in U.S.-China relations. Second, in spite of this valid continuing concern for U.S. interests, encouraging overall trends in Chinese arms exports principles and practices have resulted in more concrete Chinese unilateral, bilateral, and international commitments to stem its transfers of weapons and technologies on the one hand, coupled with market forces causing a steep overall decline in its major conventional weapons exports over the past 10 years on the other. Third, far more data, information, and documentation is available today from China on a host of questions relevant to this issue through access to officials, newspapers, policy documents, published regulations, and official statements. These sources-some of which are provided to a wider audience for the first time in this study-offer new insights into the players and process involved in Chinese arms export policy, China's military-technical relationships abroad, the internal bureaucratic and institutional pressures bearing on arms transfers, the strengths and weaknesses of China's export control system, and the extent to which Chinese decisionmakers have embraced international nonproliferation principles. Fourth, since late 1997 and early 1998, the Chinese arms production and arms export system has undergone a sweeping reorganization and restructuring process. While the basic outlines of this shake-up are discernible, its implications for future arms exports are less clear and require careful analysis. Finally, the upshot of these trends points to enduring and legitimate U.S. concerns over Chinese arms exports and proliferation activities. At the very least, this issue will remain a contentious one and will impede progress in the broader effort of the two countries to stabilize their relationship. In addition, in spite of a relative decline in its arms exports overall, China continues to provide sensitive weapons and technology to a range of recipients Washington views with concern: Iran, Myanmar (Burma), North Korea, Pakistan, and others. There is little doubt that China will employ these types of transfers as a form of leverage in its discussions with U.S. officials on other issues related to areas of concern for China, such as U.S. arms sales to Taiwan. More importantly, it remains highly likely that U.S. security interests and military forces overseas will continue to confront-both diplomatically and militarily-the challenge posed by Chinese weapons in sensitive regions across Asia and the Middle East. As a result, it is imperative to gain greater insight into Chinese arms export policies, players, and processes and their implications for U.S. interests. This study tackles these issues in two principal parts. First, in order to set the context of the study, we assess past, present, and future quantitative and qualitative trends in Chinese conventional arms transfers. The second part of the study examines Chinese arms export policy, players, and process in turn. Charts and documents attached as appendices further supplement the work of the study.
Political Science

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1994-2001

Author: Richard F. Grimmett

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 116

View: 509

This report is prepared annually to provide unclassified quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding 8 calendar years. Some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world. Developing nations continue to be the primary focus of foreign arms sales activity by weapons suppliers. During the years 1994-2001, the value of arms transfer agreements with developing nations comprised 68.3% of all such agreements worldwide. More recently, arms transfer agreements with developing nations constituted 65.8% of all such agreements globally from 1998-2001, and 60.5% of these agreements in 2001. The value of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations in 2001 was nearly $16 billion. This was the lowest total, in real terms, for the entire period from 1994-2001. In 2001, the value of all arms deliveries to developing nations was $14.4 billion, the lowest total in deliveries values for the entire period from 1994-2001 (in constant 2001 dollars). Recently, from 1998-2001, the United States and Russia have dominated the arms market in the developing world, with the United States ranking first each of the last 4 years in the value of arms transfer agreements. From 1998-2001, the United States made $35.7 billion in arms transfer agreements with developing nations, in constant 2001 dollars, 40.8% of all such agreements. Russia, the second leading supplier during this period, made over $19.8 billion in arms transfer agreements, or 22.6.%. France, the third leading supplier from 1998-2001, made $6.3 billion or 7.2% of all such agreements with developing nations during these years.