Social Science

Community Matters in Xinjiang, 1880-1949

Author: Ildikó Bellér-Hann

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 476

View: 927

Drawing on a wide range of historical sources presenting both emic and etic views, this book offers an insight into aspects of social life among the Uyghur in pre-socialist Xinjiang and substantiates the concept of tradition which modern Uyghurs draw upon to construct their ethnic identity.

The Great Dispossession

Author: Ildikó Bellér-Hann

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 437

The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, where the authors of this book have worked since 1986, has become increasingly unstable in recent decades. The Uyghurs are the easternmost people of the Turkic-Islamic civilizational belt that stretches across Central Eurasia. The incorporation of this population into the Chinese nation state has been fraught with difficulty. Central policies under socialism have fluctuated between generous encouragement of a distinct Uyghur identity and harsh repression justified with accusations of separatism and religious fundamentalism. Based on field research in the prefecture of Qumul in 2006-2009, this book explores how macro-level tensions are played out locally and regionally in the fields of actualized history and identity, social support and economic development, and the political regulation of socio-cultural life and religion.
Social Science

Socio-Economic Development in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

Author: Alessandra Cappelletti

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 317

View: 502

In an unprecedented exploration of space and power in rural Xinjiang, a Chinese region home to the Muslim population of the Uyghurs, this book adopts a grounded theory approach and a trans-ethnic perspective into the complex and sensitive topic of land issues and agricultural land evictions in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. By exposing the dynamics of land acquisition and power building in the politically contested space of the region, the author shows how state owned land in a key commercial and cultural hub on the new Silk Road became a commodity, in a context of violent human interactions driven by power. Relying on previously undisclosed material and on a unique field research among farmers and local authorities, the author retraces the steps of Uyghur peasant workers, entangled in a suspended situation between abandoned rural villages, migration and urban alienation, in a book which explores agency in violent processes of social change, and adds concepts and insights to the current knowledge of how we become modern citizens. The microcosm of Kashgar, an oasis-city in Xinjiang, acts as a mirror reflecting socio political dynamics framing people’s identity. Shedding light on one of the most inaccessible region in China, this book is a key read for academics and a broader public willing to get a clearer view of one of the sourest power struggle in the most contested region within the next superpower.
History

The Sacred Routes of Uyghur History

Author: Rian Thum

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 363

For 250 years the Turkic Muslims of Tibet, who call themselves Uyghurs today, have cultivated a sense of history and identity that challenges Beijing’s national narrative. The roots of this history run deeper than recent conflicts, Rian Thum says, to a time when manuscripts and pilgrimage along the Silk Road dominated understandings of the past.
Music

Gender in Chinese Music

Author: Rachel A. Harris

Publisher: University Rochester Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 308

View: 239

Village ritualists, international classical pianists, pop idols, and professional mourners -- whether they perform in temples, on concert stages, or in TV shows, Chinese musicians continually express and negotiate their gendered identities. Gender in Chinese Music brings together contributions from ethnomusicologists, anthropologists, and literary scholars to explore how gender is not only manifested in the diverse musical traditions of Chinese culture but also constructed through performing and observing these traditions. Individual chapters examine unique music cultures ranging from those of courting couples in China's heartlands to ethnic minority singers in the borderlands, and from Ming-period courtesans to contemporary karaoke hostesses. The book also features interviews with musicians, music industry workers, and fans talking about gender. With its wide-ranging subject matter and interdisciplinary approach, this volume will be an important resource for researchers and students interested in how music is implicated in the changing notions of masculinity, femininity, and genders "in between." Contributors: Ruard Absaroka, Rachel Harris, Stephen Jones, Frank Kouwenhoven, Olivia Kraef, Joseph Lam, Rowan Pease, Antoinet Schimmelpenninck, Hwee-San Tan, Shzr Ee Tan, Xiao Mei, Judith Zeitlin, Tiantian Zheng. Rachel Harris is a senior lecturer in ethnomusicology at SOAS, University of London. Rowan Pease is a senior teaching fellow at SOAS, University of London. Shzr Ee Tan is a lecturer in music at Royal Holloway, University of London.
Social Science

Negotiating Identities

Author: Ildikó Bellér-Hann

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 269

View: 576

The ten chapters of this book, all of them published previously in specialist works, derive from the author's ethnographic research among the Uyghur of Xinjiang and Kazakhstan in the mid-1990s. Approaching beliefs and practices as politically embedded, the articles have historical value in documenting the possibilities and constraints of fieldwork in this region in the 1990s. They also offer a point of departure for new studies of the Uyghur and their relations with their neighbors in the increasingly difficult conditions which characterize the early twenty-first century. (Series: Halle Studies in the Anthropology of Eurasia, Vol. 31) [Subject: Sociology, Anthropology]
Political Science

Securing China's Northwest Frontier

Author: David Tobin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 551

In the first study to incorporate majority Han and minority Uyghur perspectives on ethnic relations in Xinjiang following mass violence during July 2009, David Tobin analyses how official policy shapes identity and security dynamics on China's northwest frontier. He explores how the 2009 violence unfolded and how the party-state responded to ask how official identity narratives and security policies shape practices on the ground. Combining ethnographic methodology with discourse analysis and participant-observation with in-depth interviews, Tobin examines how Han and Uyghurs interpret and reinterpret Chinese nation-building. He concludes that by treating Chinese identity as a security matter, the party-state exacerbates cycles of violence between Han and Uyghurs who increasingly understand each other as threats.
History

Empire and the Social Sciences

Author: Jeremy Adelman

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 214

This thought-provoking and original collection looks at how intellectuals and their disciplines have been shaped, halted and advanced by the rise and fall of empires. It illuminates how ideas did not just reflect but also moulded global order and disorder by informing public policies and discourse. Ranging from early modern European empires to debates about recent American hegemony, Empire and the Social Sciences shows that world history cannot be separated from the empires that made it, and reveals the many ways in which social scientists constructed empires as we know them. Taking a truly global approach from China and Japan to modern America, the contributors collectively tackle a long durée of the modern world from the Enlightenment to the present day. Linking together specific moments of world history it also puts global history at the centre of a debate about globalization of the social sciences. It thus crosses and integrates several disciplines and offers graduate students, scholars and faculty an approach that intersects fields, crosses regions and maps a history of global social sciences.
Social Science

Ethnographies of Islam in China

Author: Rachel Harris

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 115

In the late 1970s Islam regained its force by generating novel forms of piety and forging new paths in politics throughout the world, including China. The Islamic revival in China, which came to fruition in the 2000s and the 2010s, prompted increases in government suppression but also intriguing resonances with the broader Muslim world—from influential theoretical and political contestations over Muslim women’s status, the popularization of mass media and the appearance of new patterns of consumption, to increases in transnational Muslim migration. Although China does not belong to the “Islamic world” as it is conventionally understood, China’s Muslims have strengthened and expanded their global connections and impact. Such significant shifts in Chinese Muslim life have received scant scholarly attention until now. With contributions from a wide variety of scholars—all sharing a commitment to the value of the ethnographic approach—this volume provides the first comprehensive account of China’s Islamic revival since the 1980s as the country struggled to recover from the wreckage of the Cultural Revolution. The authors show the multifarious nature of China’s Islam revival, which defies any reductive portrayal that paints it as a unified development motivated by a common ideology, and demonstrate how it was embedded in China’s broader economic transition. Most importantly, they trace the historical genealogies and sociopolitical conditions that undergird the crackdown on Muslim life across China, confronting head-on the difficulties of working with Muslims—Uyghur Muslims in particular—at a time of intense religious oppression, intellectual censorship, and intrusive surveillance technology. With chapters on both Hui and Uyghur Muslims, this book also traverses boundaries that often separate studies of these two groups, and illustrates with great clarity the value of disciplinary and methodological border-crossing. As such, Ethnographies of Islam in China is essential reading for those interested in Islam’s complexity in contemporary China and its broader relevance to the Muslim world and the changing nature of Chinese society seen through the prism of religion.
Religion

Handbook on Religion in China

Author: Stephan Feuchtwang

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 488

View: 545

Informative and eye-opening, the Handbook on Religion in China provides a uniquely broad insight into the contemporary Chinese variations of Buddhism, Islam and Christianity. In turn, China's own religions and transmissions of rites and systems of divination have spread beyond China, a progression that is explored in detail across 19 chapters, written by leading experts in the field.
History

Oil and Water

Author: Tom Cliff

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 833

Xinjiang is, like Tibet, one of China s autonomous regions. Despite the overwhelming attention scholars and activists have given to Tibet, Xinjiang has garnered relatively little attention. Never a quiescent place, however, it has seen one uprising after another, most recently in violent flare-ups over the cultural repression and economic exclusion of the local Muslim Uyghurs. Oil and Water, by anthropologist and photographer Tom Cliff, is the first book to turn the lens onto Han Chinese settlers. Using ethnographic vignettes, life histories, and arresting photographs, Cliff shows how large-scale social and institutional structures, historical narratives, and national political imperatives have shaped the lives of ordinary Han settlers in Xinjiang. The book weaves together the individual threads of life histories to show what it means to be Han in this frontier zone. Along the way, Cliff makes a number of surprising points: for example, that the Communist Party is in fact more concerned with stability among the Han in frontier regions than Uyghur cooperation itself; or that the frontier is simultaneously seen as backward and ahead in that it is the testing ground for policies and practices that may later be put to use in the core. Most important, by shifting the focus away from often-studied state actions and Uyghur reactions and onto the daily experience of diverse Han settlers, Oil and Water provides the first behind the scenes look into the colonial enterprise that China has tried to hide from the world since it took power sixty years ago."
Social Science

Uyghur Conceptions of Family and Society

Author: Xiaowei Zang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 331

Contributing to existing literature on ethnic studies in China, this book is a study of minority subjective experiences in China, using Uyghur Muslims as a case study. By examining Uyghur conceptions of family and society, it investigates whether or not ethnic minorities are culturally capable of understanding and internalizing global norms on equality, community, citizenship, trust, justice and wellbeing. Specifically, it empirically examines Uyghur perceptions of issues such as spousal relations, parenting, community engagement and life satisfaction. Using data gathered from fieldwork in Ürümchi, the author is able to show that there is in fact a high degree of Uyghur conformity to global norms on family and society. In the contemporary context of an Islamic revival and a recent resurgence of Uyghur nationalism, the evidence presented in this book is particularly important to the understanding of the Uyghur ethnic group and other minorities in the region. Whilst making a valuable contribution to the fields of anthropology and sociology, this book will be useful for students of Chinese studies, Religious studies, Ethnic studies and Social Psychology.
Religion

The Religious Question in Modern China

Author: Vincent Goossaert

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 480

View: 141

Recent events—from strife in Tibet and the rapid growth of Christianity in China to the spectacular expansion of Chinese Buddhist organizations around the globe—vividly demonstrate that one cannot understand the modern Chinese world without attending closely to the question of religion. The Religious Question in Modern China highlights parallels and contrasts between historical events, political regimes, and cultural movements to explore how religion has challenged and responded to secular Chinese modernity, from 1898 to the present. Vincent Goossaert and David A. Palmer piece together the puzzle of religion in China not by looking separately at different religions in different contexts, but by writing a unified story of how religion has shaped, and in turn been shaped by, modern Chinese society. From Chinese medicine and the martial arts to communal temple cults and revivalist redemptive societies, the authors demonstrate that from the nineteenth century onward, as the Chinese state shifted, the religious landscape consistently resurfaced in a bewildering variety of old and new forms. The Religious Question in Modern China integrates historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives in a comprehensive overview of China’s religious history that is certain to become an indispensible reference for specialists and students alike.
Social Science

Critical Approaches to Security in Central Asia

Author: Edward Lemon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 521

Central Asia remains on the periphery, both spatially and in people’s imaginations. When the region does attract international attention, it is often related to security issues, including terrorism, ethnic conflict and drug trafficking. This book brings together leading specialists from a range of disciplines including geography, anthropology, sociology and political science to discuss how citizens and governments within Central Asia think about and practise security. The authors explore how governments use fears of instability to bolster their rule, and how securitized populations cope with (and resist) being labelled threats through strategies that are rarely associated with security, including marriage and changing their appearance. This collection examines a wide range of security issues including Islamic extremism, small arms, interethnic relations and border regions. While coverage of the region often departs from preconceived notions of the region as dangerous, obscure and volatile, the chapters in this book all place emphasis on the way local people understand security and harmony in their daily lives. This book will be of interest to students and researchers of Central Asian Studies as well as Security Studies and Political Science. The chapters were originally published in the journal Central Asian Survey.
History

The Profits of Nature

Author: Peter B. Lavelle

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 684

In the nineteenth century, the Qing empire experienced a period of profound turmoil caused by an unprecedented conjunction of natural disasters, domestic rebellions, and foreign incursions. The imperial government responded to these calamities by introducing an array of new policies and institutions to bolster its power across its massive territories. In the process, Qing officials launched campaigns for natural resource development, seeking to take advantage of the unexploited lands, waters, and minerals of the empire’s vast hinterlands and borderlands. In this book, Peter B. Lavelle uses the life and career of Chinese statesman Zuo Zongtang (1812–1885) as a lens to explore the environmental history of this era. Although known for his pacification campaigns against rebel movements, Zuo was at the forefront of the nineteenth-century quest for natural resources. Influenced by his knowledge of nature, geography, and technology, he created government bureaus and oversaw state-funded projects to improve agriculture, sericulture, and other industries in territories across the empire. His work forged new patterns of colonial development in the Qing empire’s northwest borderlands, including Xinjiang, at a time when other empires were scrambling to secure access to resources around the globe. Weaving a narrative across the span of Zuo’s lifetime, The Profits of Nature offers a unique approach to understanding the dynamic relationship among social crises, colonialism, and the natural world during a critical juncture in Chinese history, between the high tide of imperial power in the eighteenth century and the challenges of modern state-building in the twentieth century.
Performing Arts

Routledge Handbook of Asian Theatre

Author: Siyuan Liu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 578

View: 927

Routledge Handbook of Asian Theatre is an advanced level reference guide which surveys the rich and diverse traditions of classical and contemporary performing arts in Asia, showcasing significant scholarship in recent years. An international team of over 50 contributors provide authoritative overviews on a variety of topics across Asia, including dance, music, puppetry, make-up and costume, architecture, colonialism, modernity, gender, musicals, and intercultural Shakespeare. This volume is divided into four sections covering: Representative Theatrical Traditions in Asia. Cross-Regional Aspects of Classical and Folk Theatres. Modern and Contemporary Theatres in Asian Countries. Modernity, Gender Performance, Intercultural and Musical Theatre in Asia. Offering a cutting edge overview of Asian theatre and performance, the Handbook is an invaluable resource for academics, researchers and students studying this ever-evolving field.
Political Science

Post-socialist Informalities

Author: Abel Polese

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 268

View: 753

This book is a comprehensive collection of key scholarship on informality from the whole post-socialist region. From Bosnia to Central Asia, passing through Russia and Azerbaijan, the contributions to this volume illustrate the multi-faceted and complex nature of informality, while demonstrating the growing scholarly and policy debates that have developed around the understanding of informality. In contrast to approaches which tend to classify informality as ‘bad’ or ‘transitional’ – meaning that modernity will make it disappear – this edited volume concentrates on dynamics and mechanisms to understand and explain informality, while also debating its relationship with the market and society. The authors seek to explain informality beyond a mere monetaristic/economistic approach, rediscovering its interconnection with social phenomena to propose a more holistic interpretation of the meaning of informality and its influence in various spheres of life. They do this by exploring the evolving role of informal practices in the post-socialist region, and by focusing on informality as a social organisation determinant but also looking at the way it reshapes emergent social resistance against symbolic and real political order(s). This book was originally published as two special issues, of Caucasus Survey and the Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe.
Social Science

Situating the Uyghurs Between China and Central Asia

Author: Ildikó Bellér-Hann

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 249

View: 976

Drawing together distinguished international scholars, this volume offers a unique insight into the social and cultural hybridity of the Uyghurs. The work is comparative and interdisciplinary in focus and bridges a gap in our understanding of this group.
History

Global East Asia

Author: Frank N. Pieke

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 602

Home to a rapidly rising superpower and the two largest economies in the world after the US, a global East Asia is seen and felt everywhere. This dynamic text views the global square from the perspective of the world's most important rising global center. East Asia's global impact is built on a dizzying combination: a very strong and deep civilizational self-consciousness fused with hypermodernity, wealth, influence, and power. Throughout the world, East Asia has become a beacon of modernity, independence, and wealth and is often seen as an alternative to the West. Written in short and accessible essays by prominent experts on the region, the volume covers the core of East Asian: Japan, China, and Korea--a unity of powers, economies, and cultures--as well as Mongolia and Taiwan. Topics range from contemporary culture, artistic production, food, science, economic development, digital issues, education, and international collaboration. Students will glean new perspectives about the region using the insights of global studies.