Science

Comparative Studies of Hearing in Vertebrates

Author: A. N. Popper

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 457

View: 123

The past two decades have seen an extraordinary growth of interest in the auditory mechanisms of a wide range of vertebrates and invertebrates. Investigations have ranged from auditory mechanisms in relatively simple animals where just a few cells are em ployed for detection of sound, to the highly complex detection and processing systems of man and the other mammals. Of particular significance to us has been the growing interest in general principles of vertebrate auditory system organization, as opposed to a specific and limited concern for the mammalian or even human systems. Some of the interest in nonmammalian systems has risen from the desire to fmd simpler experi mental models for both the essential components (e. g. , the hair cell receptor) and the more complex functions (e. g. , frequency analysis) of all vertebrate auditory systems. Interest has also risen from questions about the evolution of hearing and the covariation (or lack of it) in structure and function in a wide variety of biological solutions to the problems of acoustic mechanoreception. Of course, the desire to fmd simpler experi mental models and the need to answer questions about the evolution of hearing are not unrelated. In fact, detailed analyses of a variety of systems have led several times to the realization that some of the "simple systems" are more complex than initially thought.
Medical

Insights from Comparative Hearing Research

Author: Christine Köppl

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 388

View: 772

The hearing organs of non-mammals, which show quite large and systematic differences to each other and to those of mammals, provide an invaluable basis for comparisons of structure and function. By taking advantage of the vast diversity of possible study organisms provided by the "library" that is biological diversity, it is possible to learn how complex functions are realized in the inner ear through the evolution of specific structural, cellular and molecular configurations. Insights from Comparative Hearing Research brings together some of the most exciting comparative research on hearing and shows how this work has profoundly impacted our understanding of hearing in all vertebrates.
Science

Comparative Hearing: Birds and Reptiles

Author: Robert J. Dooling

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 380

View: 478

Birds and reptiles have long fascinated investigators studying hearing and the auditory system. The highly evolved auditory inner ear of birds and reptiles shares many characteristics with the ear of mammals. Thus, the two groups are essential in understanding the form and function of the vertebrate and mammalian auditory systems. Comparative Hearing: Birds and Reptiles covers the broad range of our knowledge of hearing and acoustic communication in both groups of vertebrates. This volume addresses the many similarities in their auditory systems, as well as the known significant differences about hearing in the two groups.
Science

Evolution of the Vertebrate Auditory System

Author: Geoffrey A. Manley

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 612

The function of vertebrate hearing is served by a surprising variety of sensory structures in the different groups of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. This book discusses the origin, specialization, and functional properties of sensory hair cells, beginning with environmental constraints on acoustic systems and addressing in detail the evolutionary history behind modern structure and function in the vertebrate ear. Taking a comparative approach, chapters are devoted to each of the vertebrate groups, outlining the transition to land existence and the further parallel and independent adaptations of amniotic groups living in air. The volume explores in depth the specific properties of hair cells that allowed them to become sensitive to sound and capable of analyzing sounds into their respective frequency components. Evolution of the Vertebrate Auditory System is directed to a broad audience of biologists and clinicians, from the level of advanced undergraduate students to professionals interested in learning more about the evolution, structure, and function of the ear.
Medical

Comparative Hearing: Fish and Amphibians

Author: Richard R. Fay

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 438

View: 847

Experimental approaches to auditory research make use of validated animal models to determine what can be generalized from one species to another. This volume brings together our current understanding of the auditory systems of fish and amphibians. To address broader comparative issues, this book treats both fish and amphibians together, to overcome the differing theoretical and experimental paradigms that underlie most work on these groups.
Audiology

Hearing Science

Author: Charles I. Berlin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Audiology

Page: 499

View: 567

Animal culture

Farm Animals and the Environment

Author: Clive Phillips

Publisher: C A B International

ISBN:

Category: Animal culture

Page: 430

View: 881

Interest in environmental aspects of agriculture and in farm animal welfare has grown tremendously in recent years. Yet there are few books available which provide the relevant biological background to these issues, as well as describe the effects both of the environment on farm animals and of the animals on the environment. This book provides such a broad synthesis. It is divided into four parts covering: environmental factors influencing the production and welfare of farm animals; perception of the environment by farm animals; animal responses to the environment; and the effects of farm animals on the human environment. The authors include internationally-recognized scientists from the UK, USA, Canada, France, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden and Egypt. The book will interest a wide range of students and research workers concerned with animal physiology and production, animal behavior and welfare, veterinary medicine and environmental science.
Science

Comparative Hearing: Birds and Reptiles

Author: Robert J. Dooling

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 380

View: 622

Birds and reptiles have long fascinated investigators studying hearing and the auditory system. The highly evolved auditory inner ear of birds and reptiles shares many characteristics with the ear of mammals. Thus, the two groups are essential in understanding the form and function of the vertebrate and mammalian auditory systems. Comparative Hearing: Birds and Reptiles covers the broad range of our knowledge of hearing and acoustic communication in both groups of vertebrates. This volume addresses the many similarities in their auditory systems, as well as the known significant differences about hearing in the two groups.
Science

The Evolutionary Biology of Hearing

Author: Douglas B. Webster

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 859

View: 758

To develop a science of hearing that is intellectu The five-day conference was held at the Mote ally satisfying we must first integrate the diverse, Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Florida, May - extensive body of comparative research into an 24, 1990. The invited participants came from the evolutionary context. The need for this integra fields of comparative anatomy, physiology, biophys tion, and a conceptual framework in which it could ics, animal behavior, psychophysics, evolutionary be structured, were demonstrated in landmark biology, ontogeny, and paleontology. Before the papers by van Bergeijk in 1967 and Wever in 1974. conference, preliminary manuscripts of the invited However, not since 1965, when the American papers were distributed to all participants. This facilitated - even encouraged - discussions through Society of Zoologists sponsored an evolutionary conference entitled ''The Vertebrate Ear;' has there out the conference which could be called, among other things, "lively. " The preview of papers, along been a group effort to assemble and organize our current knowledge on the evolutionary-as with the free exchange of information and opinion, opposed to comparative-biology of hearing. also helped improve the quality and consistency of In the quarter century since that conference the final manuscripts included in this volume. there have been major changes in evolutionary In addition to the invited papers, several studies concepts (e. g. , punctuated equilibrium), in sys were presented as posters during evening sessions.