Social Science

Consuming Modernity

Author: Cheryl Krasnick Warsh

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 914

Positioning consumer culture in Canada within a wider international context, Consuming Modernity explores the roots of modern Western mass culture between 1919 and 1945, when the female worker, student, and homemaker relied on new products to raise their standards of living and separate themselves from oppressive traditional attitudes. Mass-produced consumer products promised to free up women to pursue other interests shaped by marketing campaigns, advertisements, films, and radio shows. Concerns over fashion, personal hygiene, body image, and health reflected these new expectations. This volume is a fascinating look at how the forces of consumerism defined and redefined a generation.
Social Science

Consuming Modernity

Author: Carol Appadurai Breckenridge

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 261

View: 793

Illustrates that what is distinctive of any particular society is not the fact of its modernity, but rather its own unique debates about modernity. The contributors address the roles intertwined interests in the making of India's public culture, each examining different sites of consumption. The sites they explore include cinema, radio, cricket, restaurants, and tourism.
India

Consuming Modernity

Author: Carol Appadurai Breckenridge

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: India

Page: 261

View: 805

Social Science

Consuming Modernity

Author: Carol Appadurai Breckenridge

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 261

View: 418

The book aims to illustrate that what is distinctive about any particular society is not the fact of its modernity, but rather its own unique debates about modernity. Behind the embattled arena of culture in India, for example, lie particular social and political interests such as the growing middle class, the entrepreneurs and commercial institutions, and the state. The contributors address the roles of these various intertwined interests in the making of India's public culture, each examining different sites of consumption. The sites which are explored include cinema, radio, cricket, restaurants and tourism. The book also makes distinct the differences among public, mass and popular culture.
Social Science

Consuming Modernity

Author: Cheryl Krasnick Warsh

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 438

Positioning consumer culture in Canada within a wider international context, Consuming Modernity explores the roots of modern Western mass culture between 1919 and 1945, when the female worker, student, and homemaker relied on new products to raise their standards of living and separate themselves from oppressive traditional attitudes. Mass-produced consumer products promised to free up women to pursue other interests shaped by marketing campaigns, advertisements, films, and radio shows. Concerns over fashion, personal hygiene, body image, and health reflected these new expectations. This volume is a fascinating look at how the forces of consumerism defined and redefined a generation.
Art

Consuming Traditions

Author: Elizabeth Outka

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 214

View: 865

Consuming Traditions, the inaugural volume in Oxford's Modernist Literature and Culture series, is a lively and unique study of the curious relationship between British modernism and consumer culture. Through readings of key texts by George Bernard Shaw, E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, and others, Elizabeth Outka examines the early twentieth century emergence of what she terms the "commodified authentic": the aggressive marketing of an object, space, or identity that evokes an older pre-industrial authenticity. With accessible prose and insightful close readings, Outka demonstrates that a unique moment in urban culture created a largely nostalgic desire for a more rural, more culturally 'authentic' Englishness to which both writers and entrepreneurs responded.
Globalization

Consuming Modernity

Author: Caitlin A. Libby

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Globalization

Page: 174

View: 652

This paper seeks to draw from Foucault's theories on disciplinary techniques to reveal the way that media regulate women's behaviors so that their actions meet the needs of the patriarchal capitalist system from which they are situated. Using case studies from India and Thailand, the author argues that past media research has been insufficient on many different fronts. Media not only disciplines normal gender behavior and body image for women, but also regulates what it means to identify as an empowered, modern, and upwardly mobile citizen. The author suggests that media's disciplinary mechanism work to perpetuate a system where women are continually exploited by the panopticon of racialized, patriarchal capitalism. The case studies portray media as a socializing control and comparative discipline that normalizes and enforces specific gendered behavior and standards that perpetuate a patriarchal capitalist system of disadvantaging women within place specific, socio-historical and political contexts.
History

Consuming Korean Tradition in Early and Late Modernity

Author: Laurel Kendall

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 927

Contributors to this volume explore the irony of modern things made in the image of a traditional "us." They describe the multifaceted ways "tradition" is produced and consumed within the frame of contemporary Korean life and how these processes are enabled by different apparatuses of modernity that Koreans first encountered in the early twentieth century. Commoditized goods and services first appeared in the colonial period in such spectacular and spectacularly foreign forms as department stores, restaurants, exhibitions, and staged performances. Today, these same forms have become the media through which many Koreans consume "tradition" in multiple forms. In the colonial period, commercial representations of Korea—tourist sites, postcard images, souvenir miniatures, and staged performances—were produced primarily for foreign consumption, often by non-Koreans. In late modernity, efficiencies of production, communication, and transportation combine with material wealth and new patterns of leisure activity and tourism to enable the localized consumption of Korean tradition in theme parks, at sites of alternative tourism, at cultural festivals and performances, as handicrafts, art, and cuisine, and in coffee table books, broadcast music, and works of popular folklore. Consuming Korean Tradition offers a unique insight into how and why different signifiers of "Korea" have come to be valued as tradition in the present tense, the distinctive histories and contemporary anxieties that undergird this process, and how Koreans today experience their sense of a common Korean past. It offers new insights into issues of national identity, heritage preservation, tourism, performance, the commodification of contemporary life, and the nature of "tradition" and "modernity" more generally. Consuming Korean Tradition will prove invaluable to Koreanists and those interested in various aspects of contemporary Korean society, including anthropology, film/cultural studies, and contemporary history. Contributors: Katarzyna J. Cwiertka, Kyung-Koo Han, Keith Howard, Hyung Il Pai, Laurel Kendall, Okpyo Moon, Robert Oppenheim, Timothy R. Tangherlini, Judy Van Zile.
Advertising

Consuming Identity

Author: John Patrick Taylor

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Advertising

Page: 53

View: 787

Social Science

Consuming Life

Author: Zygmunt Bauman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 613

With the advent of liquid modernity, the society of producers is transformed into a society of consumers. In this new consumer society, individuals become simultaneously the promoters of commodities and the commodities they promote. They are, at one and the same time, the merchandise and the marketer, the goods and the travelling salespeople. They all inhabit the same social space that is customarily described by the term the market. The test they need to pass in order to acquire the social prizes they covet requires them to recast themselves as products capable of drawing attention to themselves. This subtle and pervasive transformation of consumers into commodities is the most important feature of the society of consumers. It is the hidden truth, the deepest and most closely guarded secret, of the consumer society in which we now live. In this new book Zygmunt Bauman examines the impact of consumerist attitudes and patterns of conduct on various apparently unconnected aspects of social life politics and democracy, social divisions and stratification, communities and partnerships, identity building, the production and use of knowledge, and value preferences. The invasion and colonization of the web of human relations by the worldviews and behavioural patterns inspired and shaped by commodity markets, and the sources of resentment, dissent and occasional resistance to the occupying forces, are the central themes of this brilliant new book by one of the worlds most original and insightful social thinkers.
Literary Criticism

Consuming Visions

Author: Maite Conde

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 227

View: 452

Consuming Visions explores the relationship between cinema and writing in early twentieth-century Brazil, focusing on how the new and foreign medium of film was consumed by a literary society in the throes of modernization. Maite Conde places this relationship in the specific context of turn-of-the-century Rio de Janeiro, which underwent a radical transformation to a modern global city, becoming a concrete symbol of the country's broader processes of change and modernization. Analyzing an array of literary texts, from journalistic essays and popular women's novels to anarchist treatises and vaudeville plays, the author shows how the writers' encounters with the cinema were consistent with the significant changes taking place in the city. The arrival and initial development of the cinema in Brazil were part of the new urban landscape in which early Brazilian movies not only articulated the processes of the city's modernization but also enabled new urban spectators—women, immigrants, a new working class, and a recently liberated slave population—to see, believe in, and participate in its future. In the process, these early movies challenged the power of the written word and of Brazilian writers, threatening the hegemonic function of writing that had traditionally forged the contours of the nation's cultural life. An emerging market of consumers of the new cultural phenomena—popular theater, the department store, the factory, illustrated magazines—reflected changes that not only modernized literary production but also altered the very life and everyday urban experiences of the population. Consuming Visions is an ambitious and engaging examination of the ways in which mass culture can become an agent of intellectual and aesthetic transformation.
Authenticity (Philosophy) in literature

Consuming Traditions

Author: Elizabeth Outka

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Authenticity (Philosophy) in literature

Page: 214

View: 551

Presenting a lively, unique study of what she terms the 'commodified authentic, ' Elizabeth Outka explores this crucial but overlooked development in the history of modernity with a piercing look at consumer culture and the marketing of authenticity in late 19th- and early 20th-century Britain
Consumption (Economics)

Mirroring Modernity

Author: Jeremy Prestholdt

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Consumption (Economics)

Page: 36

View: 445

Sports & Recreation

Consuming Football in Late Modern Life

Author: Kevin Dixon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 168

View: 364

Consuming Football in Late Modern Life explores the phenomenon of football (soccer) fandom as consumption in the age of late modernity. By centralising fandom within the sociology of consumption, the book examines how this phenomenon equates to a fluid series of consumption activities that are practiced in the course of everyday life. In turn, the work departs from much of the existing literature that features exceptional properties of fanatical fans, in order to emphasise the position that seemingly trivial acts of consumption can have a profound influence on the construction, maintenance and evolution of football fandom cultures. Containing up to date research findings derived from a programme of interviews with a sample of football fans, Kevin Dixon examines the social, emotional, economic and technological implications of consumption as fans participate in and respond to the demands of consumer life.
History

The Modern Girl Around the World

Author: The Modern Girl around the World Research Group

Publisher: Duke University Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 424

During the 1920s and 1930s, in cities from Beijing to Bombay, Tokyo to Berlin, Johannesburg to New York, the Modern Girl made her sometimes flashy, always fashionable appearance in city streets and cafes, in films, advertisements, and illustrated magazines. Modern Girls wore sexy clothes and high heels; they applied lipstick and other cosmetics. Dressed in provocative attire and in hot pursuit of romantic love, Modern Girls appeared on the surface to disregard the prescribed roles of dutiful daughter, wife, and mother. Contemporaries debated whether the Modern Girl was looking for sexual, economic, or political emancipation, or whether she was little more than an image, a hollow product of the emerging global commodity culture. The contributors to this collection track the Modern Girl as she emerged as a global phenomenon in the interwar period. Scholars of history, women’s studies, literature, and cultural studies follow the Modern Girl around the world, analyzing her manifestations in Germany, Australia, China, Japan, France, India, the United States, Russia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Along the way, they demonstrate how the economic structures and cultural flows that shaped a particular form of modern femininity crossed national and imperial boundaries. In so doing, they highlight the gendered dynamics of interwar processes of racial formation, showing how images and ideas of the Modern Girl were used to shore up or critique nationalist and imperial agendas. A mix of collaborative and individually authored chapters, the volume concludes with commentaries by Kathy Peiss, Miriam Silverberg, and Timothy Burke. Contributors: Davarian L. Baldwin, Tani E. Barlow, Timothy Burke, Liz Conor, Madeleine Yue Dong, Anne E. Gorsuch, Ruri Ito, Kathy Peiss, Uta G. Poiger, Priti Ramamurthy, Mary Louise Roberts, Barbara Sato, Miriam Silverberg, Lynn M. Thomas, Alys Eve Weinbaum
Social Science

Urban Modernity in Colonial Korea and Taiwan

Author: Jina E. Kim

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 298

"Urban Modernities reconsiders Japanese colonialism in Korea and Taiwan through a relational study of modernist literature and urban aesthetics from the late colonial period. By charting intra-Asian and transregional circulations of writers, ideas, and texts, it reevaluates the dominant narrative in current scholarship that presents Korea and Taiwan as having vastly different responses to and experiences of Japanese colonialism. By comparing representations of various colonial spaces ranging from the nation, the streets, department stores, and print spaces to underscore the shared experiences of the quotidian and the poetic, Jina E. Kim shows how the culture of urban modernity enlivened networks of connections between the colonies and destabilized the metropole-colony relationship, thus also contributing to the broader formation of global modernism"--