History

Country House Brewing in England, 1500-1900

Author: Pamela Sambrook

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 437

Until the 18th century or even later, beer was the staple drink of most men and women at all levels of society. Tea and coffee were expensive luxuries while water might well carry disease. To supply the needs of both owners and servants, every country house with an accessible source of water had a brewhouse, usually close at hand. Although many of the brewhouses still stand, in some cases with the original brewing vessels (as at Lacock and Charlecote), their habitual conversion to other uses has allowed them to be ignored. Yet they are distinctive buildings - as much part of a country house as an ice-house or stables - which need both to be recognized and preserved. The scale of brewing in country houses, which went on to a surprisingly late date in the 19th century (with odd survivals, such as Hickleton in Yorkshire, in the 20th), was often considerable, if small besides that of commercial brewing. Copious records for both brewing and consumption exist. Pamela Sambrook describes the brewing equipment, such as coppers, mash tuns, underbacks and coolers; the types of beers brewed, from strong ale to small beer, and how they were kept; and the brewers themselves, their skills and attitudes. English Country House Brewing, 1500-1900 shows the role beer played in the life of the country house, with beer allowances and beer money an integral part of servants' rewards. Generous allowances were made for arduous tasks, such as harvesting. For celebrations, such as the heir's coming of age, extra-strong ale was provided. This book, which is heavily illustrated, is an important and original contribution to architectural, brewing and social history.
History

Country House Brewing in England, 1500-1900

Author: Pamela Sambrook

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 836

Until the 18th century or even later, beer was the staple drink of most men and women at all levels of society. Tea and coffee were expensive luxuries while water might well carry disease. To supply the needs of both owners and servants, every country house with an accessible source of water had a brewhouse, usually close at hand. Although many of the brewhouses still stand, in some cases with the original brewing vessels (as at Lacock and Charlecote), their habitual conversion to other uses has allowed them to be ignored. Yet they are distinctive buildings - as much part of a country house as an ice-house or stables - which need both to be recognized and preserved. The scale of brewing in country houses, which went on to a surprisingly late date in the 19th century (with odd survivals, such as Hickleton in Yorkshire, in the 20th), was often considerable, if small besides that of commercial brewing. Copious records for both brewing and consumption exist. Pamela Sambrook describes the brewing equipment, such as coppers, mash tuns, underbacks and coolers; the types of beers brewed, from strong ale to small beer, and how they were kept; and the brewers themselves, their skills and attitudes. English Country House Brewing, 1500-1900 shows the role beer played in the life of the country house, with beer allowances and beer money an integral part of servants' rewards. Generous allowances were made for arduous tasks, such as harvesting. For celebrations, such as the heir's coming of age, extra-strong ale was provided. This book, which is heavily illustrated, is an important and original contribution to architectural, brewing and social history.
History

The Country House Servant

Author: Pamela A Sambrook

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 671

One 19th century footman complained about the work involved in drawing more than 40 baths for his household, yet Lady Grenville felt no compunction in describing her footman as a "lazy flunkey". For centuries a large body of domestic servants was an often unappreciated foundation for the smooth running of a household. Today, the warrens of "domestic offices" intrigue visitors. This book makes sense of these and the social structures behind them. It describes the skills, equipment, cleaning methods and work organization of the housemaid, laundrymaid, footman, valet and hall-boy - the servants who spent their days polishing fine furniture, and washing brilliant chandeliers, but also sponging filthy riding habits, and washing babies' nappies. The author also looks at how servants spent their leisure time. One footman enjoyed rowing on the lake every morning before work, while others had to sit up late at night sewing their own work-dresses. Contemporary manuals, diaries, accounts and first hand recollections provide a vivid insight into what life was really like for those in domestic service. A wealth of photographs, engravings and panels illustrate the domestic workings of country houses, many now looked after by the National Trust. This is an absorbing book for social historians and visitors to country houses alike.
History

Brewing Science, Technology and Print, 1700–1880

Author: James Sumner

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 521

How did the brewing of beer become a scientific process? Sumner explores this question by charting the theory and practice of the trade in Britain and Ireland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
Cooking

The Beer Bible

Author: Jeff Alworth

Publisher: Workman Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 720

View: 827

“The only book you need to understand the world’s most popular beverage. I swear on a stack of these, it’s a thumping good read.”––John Holl, editor of All About Beer Magazine and author of The American Craft Beer Cookbook Imagine sitting in your favorite pub with a friend who happens to be a world-class expert on beer. That’s this book. It covers the history: how we got from gruel-beer to black IPA in 10,000 years. The alchemy: malts, grains, and the miracle of hops. The variety: dozens of styles and hundreds of recommended brews (including suggestions based on your taste preferences), divided into four sections––Ales, Wheat Beers, Lagers, and Tart and Wild Ales––and all described in mouthwatering detail. The curiosity: how to read a Belgian label; the talk of two Budweisers; porter, the first superstyle; and what, exactly, a lager is. The pleasure. Because you don’t merely taste beer, you experience it. Winner of a 2016 IACP Award “Covers a lot of ground, from beer styles and brewing methods to drinking culture past and present. There’s something for beer novices and beer geeks alike.”––Ken Grossman, founder, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. “Erudite, encyclopedic, and enormously entertaining aren’t words you normally associate with beer, but The Beer Bible is no ordinary beer book. As scinitillating, diverse, and refreshing as man’s oldest alcoholic beverage itself.”––Steve Raichlen, author of Project Smoke and How to Grill
Cooking

The Beer Bible: Second Edition

Author: Jeff Alworth

Publisher: Workman Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 656

View: 961

The most comprehensive guide to the world of beer, with everything you need to know bout what to drink, where, when and why. “The ultimate guide.” —Sports Illustrated Imagine sitting in your favorite pub with a good friend who just happens to have won a TACP Award—a major culinary accolade—for writing the book about beer. Then imagine that he’s been spending the years following the first edition exploring all the changes that continue to shape and evolve the brewing world. That’s this book, the completely revised and updated bible on beer that covers everything: The History, or how we got from the birth of malting and national traditions to a hazy IPA in 12,000 years. The Variety: dozens of styles and hundreds of brews, along with recommended “Beers to Know.” The Curiosity: If beer’s your passion, you’ll delight in learning what type of hops went into a favorite beer and where to go for beer tourism, as well as profiles of breweries from around the world. And lastly, The Pleasure. Because, ultimately, that’s what it’s all about. “A tome worthy of its name.” —Food and Wine “Easily digestible for drinkers of all levels.”—Imbibe “Pick up this book as a refresher or a gift, lest we forget that spreading beer education is just as important as advocating for good beer itself.”—Beer Advocate
Business & Economics

A History of Drink and the English, 1500-2000

Author: Paul Jennings

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 230

View: 217

A 2017 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title award winner *********************************************** This book is an introduction to the history of alcoholic drink in England from the end of the Middle Ages to the present day. Treating the subject thematically, it covers who drank, what they drank, how much, who produced and sold drink, the places where it was enjoyed and the meanings which drinking had for people. It also looks at the varied opposition to drinking and the ways in which it has been regulated and policed. As a social and cultural history, it examines the place of drink in society and how social developments have affected its history and what it meant to individuals and groups as a cultural practice. Covering an extended period in time, this book takes in the important changes brought about by the Reformation and the processes of industrialization and urbanization. This volume also focuses on drink in relation to class and gender and the importance of global developments, along with the significance of regional and local difference. Whilst a work of history, it draws upon the insights of a range of other disciplines which have together advanced our understanding of alcohol. The focus is England, but it acknowledges the importance of comparison with the experience of other countries in furthering our understanding of England’s particular experience. This book argues for the centrality of drink in English society throughout the period under consideration, whilst emphasizing the ways in which its use, abuse and how they have been experienced and perceived have changed at different historical moments. It is the first scholarly work which covers the history of drink in England in all its aspects over such an extended period of time. Written in a lively and approachable style, this book is suitable for those who study social and cultural history, as well as those with an interest in the history of drink in England.
Cooking

Brew Britannia

Author: Jessica Boak

Publisher: Aurum

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 304

View: 637

How punter power pulled the humble pint back from the brink, this is the surprising story of a very British consumer revolt! Following a cast of bloody-minded City bankers, hippie microbrewers, style gurus, a Python, and a lot of men in pubs, Brew Britannia tells the story of the campaign to revitalise the nation's beer which became the most successful consumer revolt in British history! Fifty years ago the future of British beer looked as bleak as the weak, sweet, bland and fizzy pints being poured, as colossal combines took over the industry, closing local breweries and putting profit before palate. Yet today the number of breweries is at a post-war high, with over a thousand in operation, membership of The Campaign for Real Ale organisation (CAMRA) exploding in recent years with over 150,000 active members and exciting new developments brewing. In a barn in Somerset, plans are afoot to ferment a beer-cider hybrid with wild yeast that blows on the wind, while in Yorkshire an almost extinct style of 'salt 'n' sour' wheat beer is being resurrected for the 21st century. Whether you drink traditional, CAMRA-approved ‘real ale’ or prefer a super-strong, fruit-infused, barrel-aged Belgian-style ‘saison', this astonishing story from the authors of popular beer blog Boak and Bailey will have you thirsty for more!
History

Comfort, Pleasure and Prestige

Author: Alan Wilson

Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 647

Comfort, Pleasure and Prestige describes the ways in which the Welsh gentry used domestic technology to ensure that their country-house lifestyle was as comfortable as possible. While the focus of the book is unashamedly about the technology of country houses, in order to explain why some technologies were adopted while others were not, domestic technology is placed squarely in its social and historical context. Although the Welsh gentry’s fortunes fluctuated wildly between 1750 and 1930, throughout that period they continued to pursue a quite hedonistic lifestyle in the relative opulence of their country houses. To a large extent, they did so, due to their willingness to install new forms of technology such as flush toilets, electric lighting and central heating. In exploring the relationship between technology, domestic service and the gentry’s social aspirations, Comfort, Pleasure and Prestigedraws on examples of country houses from across west Wales. This book is essential reading for those wanting to know more about the technologies that enabled country houses to run smoothly. It is also essential reading for those who wish to understand more fully how the gentry actually lived, and the social, technical and economic factors that lay behind the introduction of new technology in Welsh country houses.
Technology & Engineering

A History of Beer and Brewing

Author: Ian S Hornsey

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 760

View: 729

A History of Beer and Brewing provides a comprehensive account of the history of beer. Research carried out during the last quarter of the 20th century has permitted us to re-think the way in which some ancient civilizations went about their beer production. There have also been some highly innovative technical developments, many of which have led to the sophistication and efficiency of 21st century brewing methodology. A History of Beer and Brewing covers a time-span of around eight thousand years and in doing so: * Stimulates the reader to consider how, and why, the first fermented beverages might have originated * Establishes some of the parameters that encompass the diverse range of alcoholic beverages assigned the generic name 'beer' * Considers the possible means of dissemination of early brewing technologies from their Near Eastern origins The book is aimed at a wide readership particularly beer enthusiasts. However the use of original quotations and references associated with them should enable the serious scholar to delve into this subject in even greater depth.
Cooking

Beer in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

Author: Richard W. Unger

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 319

View: 563

"This is an important book on the history of beer and brewing and is a valuable resource for scholars."--"Choice"
History

The Servants' Story

Author: Pamela Sambrook

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 650

A look at the personal lives of the people who served one of the richest families in Britain.
History

Keeping Their Place

Author: Pamela Sambrook

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 613

In 1851 there were over a million servants in Britain. This book reveals first-hand tales of put-upon servants, who often had to rise hours before dawn to lay fires, heat water and prepare meals for their employers, and then work into the small hours. Yet there are also heartwarming stories of personal devotion, and reward, and of how the servants enjoyed themselves in their time off. There are moments of great poignancy as well as hilarity: a steward's dawning realisation that the housekeeper he befriended is a thief; a young footman chasing a melon as it rolls through a castle's corridors into the moat; the smart manservant weeping at the station as he bids farewell to his mother. This was an era when footmen were paid extra for being six foot or over, and female servants had to wear black bonnets to church.
Cooking

The Home Brewer's Recipe Database

Author: Les Howarth

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 366

View: 384

This is not a recipe book. It is a database of ingredient information that should assist the home or craft brewer in creating their own recipes in order to attempt the replication of commercial beers. Instructions on how to convert the supplied ingredient information into recipes customised to the brewer's own equipment and technique are provided. This book also provides inspiration to brewers wishing to experiment with different ingredients since it gives an interesting insight into how professional brewers have used them in their own brews. Finally, this book should also be of interest to the discerning beer enthusiast who is curious about what goes into their favourite drink. This second edition provides substantially more data than the well-received first edition.
History

British Breweries

Author: Lynn Pearson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 249

Covering the history of the architecture of breweries, this account ranges from the country house brewhouse of the 18th century to the great breweries of Georgian and Victorian England, which reached their ornate peak in the 1880s and 1890s. It deals with the practical considerations that brewers' architects and engineers had to take into account, as well as the architectural styles and the decorative features employed. The author has also included a gazetteer of brewery architecture.
Cooking

Cuisine and Empire

Author: Rachel Laudan

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 488

View: 938

Rachel Laudan tells the remarkable story of the rise and fall of the world’s great cuisines—from the mastery of grain cooking some twenty thousand years ago, to the present—in this superbly researched book. Probing beneath the apparent confusion of dozens of cuisines to reveal the underlying simplicity of the culinary family tree, she shows how periodic seismic shifts in “culinary philosophy”—beliefs about health, the economy, politics, society and the gods—prompted the construction of new cuisines, a handful of which, chosen as the cuisines of empires, came to dominate the globe. Cuisine and Empire shows how merchants, missionaries, and the military took cuisines over mountains, oceans, deserts, and across political frontiers. Laudan’s innovative narrative treats cuisine, like language, clothing, or architecture, as something constructed by humans. By emphasizing how cooking turns farm products into food and by taking the globe rather than the nation as the stage, she challenges the agrarian, romantic, and nationalistic myths that underlie the contemporary food movement.
History

Food, Energy and the Creation of Industriousness

Author: Craig Muldrew

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 510

Until the widespread harnessing of machine energy, food was the energy which fuelled the economy. In this groundbreaking 2011 study of agricultural labourers' diet and material standard of living, Craig Muldrew uses empirical research to present a much fuller account of the interrelationship between consumption, living standards and work in the early modern English economy than has previously existed. The book integrates labourers into a study of the wider economy and engages with the history of food as an energy source and its importance to working life, the social complexity of family earnings, and the concept of the 'industrious revolution'. It argues that 'industriousness' was as much the result of ideology and labour markets as labourers' household consumption. Linking this with ideas about the social order of early modern England, the author demonstrates that bread, beer and meat were the petrol of this world, and a springboard for economic change.
Cooking

IPA

Author: Mitch Steele

Publisher: Brewers Publications

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 347

View: 196

Explore the evolution of one of craft beer’s most popular styles, India pale ale. Equipped with brewing tips from some of the country’s best brewers, IPA covers techniques from water treatment to hopping procedures. Included are 48 recipes ranging from historical brews to recipes for the most popular contemporary IPAs made by craft brewers such as Pizza Port, Dogfish Head, Stone, Firestone Walker, Russian River, and Deschutes.
History

Alcohol, Violence, and Disorder in Traditional Europe

Author: A. Lynn Martin

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 457

Traditional Europe had high levels of violence and of alcohol consumption, both higher than they are in modern Western societies, where studies demonstrate a link between violence and alcohol. A. Lynn Martin uses an anthropological approach to examine drinking, drinking establishments, violence, and disorder, and compares the wine-producing south with the beer-drinking north and Catholic France and Italy with Protestant England, and explores whether alcohol consumption can also explain the violence and disorder of traditional Europe. Both Catholic and Protestant moralists believed in the link, and they condemned drunkenness and drinking establishments for causing violence and disorder. They did not advocate complete abstinence, however, for alcoholic beverages had an important role in most people's diets. Less appreciated by the moralists was alcohol's function as the ubiquitous social lubricant and the increasing importance of alehouses and taverns as centers of popular recreation. The study utilizes both quantitative and qualitative evidence from a wide variety of sources to question the beliefs of the moralists and the assumptions of modern scholars about the role of alcohol and drinking establishments in causing violence and disorder. It ends by analyzing the often-conflicting regulations of local, regional, and national governments that attempted to ensure that their citizens had a reliable supply of good drink at a reasonable cost but also to control who drank what, where, when, and how. No other comparable book examines the relationship of alcohol to violence and disorder during this period.
Cooking

Mild Ale

Author: Dave Sutula

Publisher: Brewers Publications

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 200

View: 756

No longer are mild ales confined to the small towns of England. Once a designation for an entire class of beers, mild ale now refers to a beer style some describe as the “elixir of life for the salt of the earth.” Mild is a beer that can be at once light or dark, very low or very high in alcohol, and either rich in dark malt flavor or light and crisp with a touch of hop flavor and aroma. The recipes included offer a wide range of interpretations for a style that has unparalleled flexibility. The Classic Beer Style Series from Brewers Publications examines individual world-class beer styles, covering origins, history, sensory profiles, brewing techniques and commercial examples.