Philosophy

Dark Ecology

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 222

Timothy Morton argues that ecological awareness in the present Anthropocene era takes the form of a strange loop or Möbius strip, twisted to have only one side. Deckard travels this oedipal path in Blade Runner (1982) when he learns that he might be the enemy he has been ordered to pursue. Ecological awareness takes this shape because ecological phenomena have a loop form that is also fundamental to the structure of how things are. The logistics of agricultural society resulted in global warming and hardwired dangerous ideas about life-forms into the human mind. Dark ecology puts us in an uncanny position of radical self-knowledge, illuminating our place in the biosphere and our belonging to a species in a sense that is far less obvious than we like to think. Morton explores the logical foundations of the ecological crisis, which is suffused with the melancholy and negativity of coexistence yet evolving, as we explore its loop form, into something playful, anarchic, and comedic. His work is a skilled fusion of humanities and scientific scholarship, incorporating the theories and findings of philosophy, anthropology, literature, ecology, biology, and physics. Morton hopes to reestablish our ties to nonhuman beings and to help us rediscover the playfulness and joy that can brighten the dark, strange loop we traverse.
Business & Economics

Monument Culture

Author: Laura A. Macaluso

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 300

View: 397

This book brings together a collection of essays from scholars and cultural critics working on the meanings of monuments and memorials in the second decade of the twenty-first century, a time of great social and political change.
Ethics

Disasters: Core Concepts and Ethical Theories

Author: Dónal P. O’Mathúna

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Ethics

Page: 244

View: 407

This Open Access Book is the first to examine disasters from a multidisciplinary perspective. Justification of actions in the face of disasters requires recourse both to conceptual analysis and ethical traditions. Part 1 of the book contains chapters on how disasters are conceptualized in different academic disciplines relevant to disasters. Part 2 has chapters on how ethical issues that arise in relation to disasters can be addressed from a number of fundamental normative approaches in moral and political philosophy. This book sets the stage for more focused normative debates given that no one book can be completely comprehensive. Providing analysis of core concepts, and with real-world relevance, this book should be of interest to disaster scholars and researchers, those working in ethics and political philosophy, as well as policy makers, humanitarian actors and intergovernmental organizations.
Science

Coexistentialism and the Unbearable Intimacy of Ecological Emergency

Author: Sam Mickey

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 260

View: 427

Engaging with contemporary renewals of existentialism as "coexistentialism" and "ecological existentialism," this book extends existentialist concerns for human existence to include the unique differences and strange possibilities of all humans and nonhumans intimately intertwined in the emergency conditions of ecological coexistence.
Literary Collections

The Persistence of Beauty

Author: Mark Sandy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 208

View: 170

This significant collection of essays examines the cultural, literary, philosophical and historical representation of beauty in British, Irish and American literature. Contributors use the works of Charles Dickens, T S Eliot, W H Auden and Stephen Spender among others to explore the role of beauty and its wider implications in art and society.
Science

Being Ecological

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 310

'To read Being Ecological is to be caught up in a brilliant display of intellectual pyrotechnics' P.D.Smith, Guardian Why is everything we think we know about ecology wrong? Is there really any difference between 'humans' and 'nature'? Does this mean we even have a future? Don't care about ecology? This book is for you. Timothy Morton, who has been called 'Our most popular guide to the new epoch' (Guardian), sets out to show us that whether we know it or not, we already have the capacity and the will to change the way we understand the place of humans in the world, and our very understanding of the term 'ecology'. A cross-disciplinarian who has collaborated with everyone from Björk to Hans Ulrich Obrist, Morton is also a member of the object-oriented philosophy movement, a group of forward-looking thinkers who are grappling with modern-day notions of subjectivity and objectivity, while also offering fascinating new understandings of Heidegger and Kant. Calling the volume a book containing 'no ecological facts', Morton confronts the 'information dump' fatigue of the digital age, and offers an invigorated approach to creating a liveable future.