Computers

Data Matching

Author: Peter Christen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 272

View: 726

Data matching (also known as record or data linkage, entity resolution, object identification, or field matching) is the task of identifying, matching and merging records that correspond to the same entities from several databases or even within one database. Based on research in various domains including applied statistics, health informatics, data mining, machine learning, artificial intelligence, database management, and digital libraries, significant advances have been achieved over the last decade in all aspects of the data matching process, especially on how to improve the accuracy of data matching, and its scalability to large databases. Peter Christen’s book is divided into three parts: Part I, “Overview”, introduces the subject by presenting several sample applications and their special challenges, as well as a general overview of a generic data matching process. Part II, “Steps of the Data Matching Process”, then details its main steps like pre-processing, indexing, field and record comparison, classification, and quality evaluation. Lastly, part III, “Further Topics”, deals with specific aspects like privacy, real-time matching, or matching unstructured data. Finally, it briefly describes the main features of many research and open source systems available today. By providing the reader with a broad range of data matching concepts and techniques and touching on all aspects of the data matching process, this book helps researchers as well as students specializing in data quality or data matching aspects to familiarize themselves with recent research advances and to identify open research challenges in the area of data matching. To this end, each chapter of the book includes a final section that provides pointers to further background and research material. Practitioners will better understand the current state of the art in data matching as well as the internal workings and limitations of current systems. Especially, they will learn that it is often not feasible to simply implement an existing off-the-shelf data matching system without substantial adaption and customization. Such practical considerations are discussed for each of the major steps in the data matching process.
Law

Progress in tackling benefit fraud

Author: Great Britain: National Audit Office

Publisher: The Stationery Office

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 49

View: 773

This NAO report is a follow up to one issued in the 2002-03 session (HC 393, ISBN 9780102920635), Tackling Benefit Fraud. The report sets out some key facts, including: that the total benefit expenditure is £120 billion; the total number of recipients is 18 million; the total estimated fraud is £0.8 billion. In the 2006-07 period, £154 million was spent on six strategies to reduce fraud, with a Departmental estimate of £106 million of benefit overpayments identified as a result of fraud investigation and compliance activity. Also in the 2006-07 period, the Department recovered £22 million of the total £339 million outstanding fraud debt. Although the NAO has identified that fraud has fallen from an estimated £2 billion in 2001-02 to an estimated £0.8 billion in 2006-07, official error has risen in the same period from £1 billion to £1.9 billion. Tackling fraud is a key priority for the Department for Work and Pensions, and the report examines the main anti-fraud initiatives, recognising that: tackling benefit is inherently difficult; that the UK has levels of social security fraud and error which are similar to those of comparable countries; that the Department has made good progress in tackling fraud, but will find it increasingly difficult to secure further year on year reductions. The NAO has also set out a number of recommendations, including: that the Department's management information on fraud could be improved, with greater communication between the various departmental directorates responsible for counter-fraud work; that a review of the cost effectiveness of the Customer Compliance approach (which deals with lower risk cases of fraud) should be done; that a record of the outcomes of prosecution activities should be taken by case type to provide better Departmental information; that the Department must review recovery of overpayments in fraud cases and consider setting appropriate targets for recovery from customers who have committed fraud.
Computers

Data Quality and Record Linkage Techniques

Author: Thomas N. Herzog

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 234

View: 134

This book offers a practical understanding of issues involved in improving data quality through editing, imputation, and record linkage. The first part of the book deals with methods and models, focusing on the Fellegi-Holt edit-imputation model, the Little-Rubin multiple-imputation scheme, and the Fellegi-Sunter record linkage model. The second part presents case studies in which these techniques are applied in a variety of areas, including mortgage guarantee insurance, medical, biomedical, highway safety, and social insurance as well as the construction of list frames and administrative lists. This book offers a mixture of practical advice, mathematical rigor, management insight and philosophy.
Computers

Building a Data Warehouse

Author: Vincent Rainardi

Publisher: Apress

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 523

View: 426

Building a Data Warehouse: With Examples in SQL Server describes how to build a data warehouse completely from scratch and shows practical examples on how to do it. Author Vincent Rainardi also describes some practical issues he has experienced that developers are likely to encounter in their first data warehousing project, along with solutions and advice. The relational database management system (RDBMS) used in the examples is SQL Server; the version will not be an issue as long as the user has SQL Server 2005 or later. The book is organized as follows. In the beginning of this book (chapters 1 through 6), you learn how to build a data warehouse, for example, defining the architecture, understanding the methodology, gathering the requirements, designing the data models, and creating the databases. Then in chapters 7 through 10, you learn how to populate the data warehouse, for example, extracting from source systems, loading the data stores, maintaining data quality, and utilizing the metadata. After you populate the data warehouse, in chapters 11 through 15, you explore how to present data to users using reports and multidimensional databases and how to use the data in the data warehouse for business intelligence, customer relationship management, and other purposes. Chapters 16 and 17 wrap up the book: After you have built your data warehouse, before it can be released to production, you need to test it thoroughly. After your application is in production, you need to understand how to administer data warehouse operation. What you’ll learn A detailed understanding of what it takes to build a data warehouse The implementation code in SQL Server to build the data warehouse Dimensional modeling, data extraction methods, data warehouse loading, populating dimension and fact tables, data quality, data warehouse architecture, and database design Practical data warehousing applications such as business intelligence reports, analytics applications, and customer relationship management Who this book is for There are three audiences for the book. The first are the people who implement the data warehouse. This could be considered a field guide for them. The second is database users/admins who want to get a good understanding of what it would take to build a data warehouse. Finally, the third audience is managers who must make decisions about aspects of the data warehousing task before them and use the book to learn about these issues.
Computers

Beyond Big Data

Author: Martin Oberhofer

Publisher: IBM Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 272

View: 258

Drive Powerful Business Value by Extending MDM to Social, Mobile, Local, and Transactional Data Enterprises have long relied on Master Data Management (MDM) to improve customer-related processes. But MDM was designed primarily for structured data. Today, crucial information is increasingly captured in unstructured, transactional, and social formats: from tweets and Facebook posts to call center transcripts. Even with tools like Hadoop, extracting usable insight is difficult—often, because it’s so difficult to integrate new and legacy data sources. In Beyond Big Data, five of IBM’s leading data management experts introduce powerful new ways to integrate social, mobile, location, and traditional data. Drawing on pioneering experience with IBM’s enterprise customers, they show how Social MDM can help you deepen relationships, improve prospect targeting, and fully engage customers through mobile channels. Business leaders and practitioners will discover powerful new ways to combine social and master data to improve performance and uncover new opportunities. Architects and other technical leaders will find a complete reference architecture, in-depth coverage of relevant technologies and use cases, and domain-specific best practices for their own projects. Coverage Includes How Social MDM extends fundamental MDM concepts and techniques Architecting Social MDM: components, functions, layers, and interactions Identifying high value relationships: person to product and person to organization Mapping Social MDM architecture to specific products and technologies Using Social MDM to create more compelling customer experiences Accelerating your transition to highly-targeted, contextual marketing Incorporating mobile data to improve employee productivity Avoiding privacy and ethical pitfalls throughout your ecosystem Previewing Semantic MDM and other emerging trends