Music

Developing Musicianship through Aural Skills

Author: Kent D. Cleland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 520

View: 558

Developing Musicianship through Aural Skills, Third Edition, is a comprehensive method for learning to hear, sing, understand, and use the foundations of music as part of an integrated curriculum, incorporating both sight singing and ear training in one volume. Under the umbrella of musicianship, this textbook guides students to "hear what they see, and see what they hear," with a trained, discerning ear on both a musical and an aesthetic level. Key features of this new edition include: Revised selection of musical examples, with added new examples including more excerpts from the literature, more part music, and examples at a wider range of levels, from easy to challenging New instructional material on dictation, phrase structure, hearing cadences, and reading lead sheets and Nashville number charts An updated website that now includes a comprehensive Teacher’s Guide with sample lesson plans, supplemental assignments, and test banks; instructional videos; and enhanced dictation exercises The text reinforces both musicianship and theory in a systematic method, and its holistic approach provides students the skills necessary to incorporate professionalism, creativity, confidence, and performance preparation in their music education. Over 1,600 musical examples represent a wide range of musical styles and genres, including classical, jazz, musical theatre, popular, and folk music. The third edition of Developing Musicianship through Aural Skills provides a strong foundation for undergraduate music students and answers the need for combining skills in a more holistic, integrated music theory core.
Music

Developing Musicianship Through Aural Skills

Author: Kent D. Cleland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 592

View: 817

Developing Musicianship Through Aural Skills is a comprehensive method for learning to hear, sing, understand, and use the foundations of music as a part of an integrated and holistic curriculum for training professional musicians. Each chapter is organized to take advantage of how our minds and instincts naturally hear and understand music and provides a variety of exercises for practicing and integrating the structure into your musical vocabulary. Developing Musicianship Through Aural Skills will provide you with the musical terms, progressions, resolutions, and devices that you will be able to draw upon as a functional and usable musical vocabulary. Ear training exercises on the companion website reinforce both discrete structures (intervals, chords, etc.) as well as all rhythmic and melodic material, and sections are provided to open discussion and reflection on the skills and attitudes professional musicians need to be successful. Features: Easy to Understand Explanations: Topics are logically ordered and explained to help the student make connections to their theory instruction and common usage. A Complete Method: Detailed instructions are given for singing and hearing structures as they most commonly appear in music., providing students with a proven, reliable process for creating and discerning musical structures. Exercises: Ideas for drill, pitch patterns, rhythms, melodies, duets, sing and plays, and examples from the literature help the student to integrate each chapter’s material. Reflections: Discussions of topics that help students to develop as a person, a professional, and an artist, and to integrate aural skills into their musical education. Companion Website: Ear Training tools and video demonstrations. You can find the companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/developingmusicianship.
Music

Developing Musicianship Through Aural Skills

Author: Kent D. Cleland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 508

View: 129

Developing Musicianship through Aural Skills, Second Edition, is a comprehensive method for learning to hear, sing, understand, and use the foundations of music as part of an integrated curriculum, incorporating both sight singing and ear training in one volume. Under the umbrella of musicianship, this textbook guides students to "hear what they see, and see what they hear," with a trained, discerning ear on both a musical and an aesthetic level. Key features of this new edition include: Revised organization, with exercises gradually progressing from the simple to more difficult, taking beginner students’ varied skill sets into account. An enhanced companion website, with interactive training modules for students to practice core skills, and additional exercises, dictation lesson plans and worksheets for instructors Enhanced coverage and a specific methodology for covering post-tonal material Greater emphasis on developing improvisation skills and realizing lead sheets The text reinforces both musicianship and theory in a systematic method, and its holistic approach provides students the skills necessary to incorporate professionalism, creativity, confidence, and performance preparation in their music education. The second edition of Developing Musicianship through Aural Skills provides a strong foundation for undergraduate music students and answers the need for combining skills in a more holistic, integrated music theory core.
Ear training

Musicianship Through Applied Music Theory

Author: Russell Nebelung

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Ear training

Page: 223

View: 150

The purpose of this semester course is to guide students in developing musicianship, an amalgam of aural skills and basic theoretical fluency that create a musician capable of sight-singing, transcribing, playing by ear, and improvising. In essence this is a course designed to teach rudimentary guitar, theory, and aural skills with the belief that directly training students in the nuts and bolts of how to fluently auralize and visualize musical patterns will create musicians with higher ability and love for the art. In order to accomplish these goals this course will provide students with straightforward written work, guided classroom work, little demand on technique or the learning of pieces, and loads of playing, singing, listening, and repetition. Guitar instruction consists of technique and fretboard knowledge necessary for performing intervals, scales, chords, arpeggios, and progressions, with the ultimate goal being the practice of melodic fragments with the guitar and voice in order to combine ears, mind, and instrument into a cohesive unit. Nearly all written materials necessary to teach this course are included. These materials are comprised of written listening drills, teaching handouts, guitar charts, melodic patterns, modal song examples, assignment worksheets, and two written exams. Nine pieces from The Real Easy Book: Tunes for Beginning Improvisers by the Stanford Jazz Workshop have been chosen as the main source of song material for their simple, repetitive, and riff -based natures, which lend themselves readily to the goals of this course. Singing and listening drills are based largely on and are used in conjunction with the David Burge Relative Pitch Ear Training Supercourse. Numerous additions have been made to work with and expand upon Burge's materials. Ear training software such as Auralia or EarMaster is required for students to test their ear training progress in mastering basic intervals throughout the semester. Students will also be required to record and upload videos of themselves singin g and performing on the guitar for exams.
Ear training

The Ploger Method

Author: Marianne Ploger

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category: Ear training

Page: 308

View: 793

For over forty years, Marianne Ploger has been teaching music lovers of all ages, interests, and aptitudes to discover their own musical gifts. She has found that it is not the ear that requires training-it is the mind. When the conscious mind knows what it is supposed to do, it effortlessly syncs with natural aural perceptions. In this book, Marianne shares the secrets that have helped hundreds develop more fluency and musicality in hearing, performing, reading, and writing music. Essentially, music is made up of few basic elements: 12 pitches, 11 di-chords, and rhythms grouped into two and/or three beats. Concrete descriptions of what to listen for in each of these elements, discovered by Ploger, will help you to develop the mental and aural skills needed for fluency and musicality. Techniques are provided to help you avoid common psychological pitfalls in the learning process. Find out how easy it is to read in any of the seven clefs, while developing skill in the French fixed syllable system employed at major conservatories throughout the world. After establishing familiarity with the basic elements, learn how to use your newfound knowledge and skill to identify more sophisticated forms, such as chords, modes, scales, polyrhythms and mixed meters.
Music

Improve Your Aural! Grade 1

Author: Paul Harris

Publisher: Improve Your Aural

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 16

View: 801

Having a good ear is vital to becoming a successful musician, and Improve Your Aural! is here to help develop your musicianship in easy progressive stages. Through fun listening activities, boxes to fill in, and practice exercises, this interactive workbook and two CDs focus directly on all those key skills you need. And because all aspects of musical training are of course connected, a range of activities are included to help develop the ear This new edition of this popular series supports the new ABRSM syllabus requirements from 2010, ensuring success in the aural test of graded exams, including singing, writing, composing, and playing your instrument.
Composition (Music)

Composition in Secondary Instrumental Music Education

Author: Matthew Doiron

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Composition (Music)

Page: 351

View: 417

With the intent of improving music curriculum and instruction in performing ensembles, the purpose of this study was to describe two high school instrumental music teachers who prioritize composition in their performing ensemble curriculum. The research questions that guided this study were: 1. What is the nature of each participant's background and inspiration for including composition in performing ensemble curriculum? 2. How do participants provide composition instruction in performing ensembles? 3. How do participants assess student achievement in composition? I collected data via (a) three participant interviews; (b) observation of classes and ensemble rehearsals; and (c) collection of artifacts provided by the participants including curriculum documents, assignments, and sample student work. I analyzed data from each participant individually, and then compared their pedagogy and composition curriculum. Both participants in this study provided opportunities for their students to learn how to compose. They reported that this allowed for growth in aural skills, musical knowledge, and performance ability. Both participants believed that creative musical activities enhance music reading and performance skills, aid in developing musicianship, and support intrinsic motivation for music. The participants' inspiration for including composition in their curriculum difffered. One participant found his passion for music creativity outside of formal music education and vowed to provide a similar experience for all of his students. The other participant discovered that even students who struggled to create high quality compositions found the creative process both motivating and meaningful. Participants' pedagogy at each school focused on developing students' aural skills and analytical understanding by using ensemble literature as examples of compositional excellence. Both participants encouraged their students to explore musical ideas in a safe environment and to consider mistakes an opportunity to further musical understanding. While both participants assessed students by providing them with constant formative assessment during composition instruction, both cautioned against the misuses of summative assessments of creative work. Findings from this study suggest that providing composition instruction may be a practical and meaningful goal in secondary instrumental music education.
Bands (Music)

guide Conductor's score ; pt. 1 Flute ; pt. 2 Oboe ; pt. 3 B♭ clarinet ; pt. 4 Alto clarinet ; pt. 5 Bass clarinet ; pt. 6 Bassoon ; pt. 7 Alto saxophone ; pt. 8 Tenor saxophone ; pt. 9 Baritone saxophone ; pt. 10 Trumpet ; pt. 11 Horn ; pt. 12 Trombone ; ; pt. 13 Baritone B.C. ; pt. 14 Baritone T.C. ; pt. 15 Tuba ; pt. 16 Keyboard percussion ; pt. 17 Percussion ; pt. 18 Combined percussion ; pt. 19 Accessory percussion

Author: Sandy Feldstein

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bands (Music)

Page: 411

View: 148

Aural and the University Music Undergraduate

Author: Colin R. Wright

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 445

View: 431

Research indicates that aural skills are vital in developing musical expertise, yet the precise nature of those skills and the emphasis placed upon them in educational contexts merit closer attention and exploration. This book assesses the relevance of aural in a university music degree and as a preparation for the professional career of a classical musician. By way of the discussion of four empirical studies, two main areas are investigated: firstly, the relationship between university music students’ aural ability and their overall success on a music degree programme, and, secondly, the views of music students and professional musicians about aural and its relevance to their career are analysed. The subject is investigated particularly in the light of the current socio-educational background of the past fifty years, which has greatly influenced the participation of music and the study and development of musicianship. Many related issues are touched upon as part of the research for this project, and these emerge as relevant topics in the discussion of aural. Apart from students’ and musicians’ views on training and singing, aspects considered include the role of improvisation, memorisation and notation, examinations, absolute pitch and the affinity with language, all of which have a part to play in the debate about the importance of aural.
Music in universities and colleges

Comprehensive Musicianship

Author: Contemporary Music Project for Creativity in Music Education

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music in universities and colleges

Page: 88

View: 857

Computers

Computers in Music Education

Author: Andrew R. Brown

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 338

View: 465

Computers in Music Education addresses the question of how computer technologies might best assist music education. For current and preservice music teachers and designed as a development tool, reference resource, and basic teaching text, it addresses pedagogical issues and the use of computers to aid production and presentation of students' musical works. Written by a music educator and digital media specialist, it cuts through the jargon to present a concise, easy-to-digest overview of the field, covering: notation software MIDI sound creation downloading music posting personal MP3s for mass distribution. While there are many more technical books, few offer a comprehensive, understandable overview of the field. Computers in Music Education is an important text for the growing number of courses in this area.