Best books

Early Chinese Texts

Author: Michael Loewe

Publisher: University of California Inst of East

ISBN:

Category: Best books

Page: 546

View: 463

Art

Early Chinese Texts on Painting

Author: Susan Bush

Publisher: Hong Kong University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 416

View: 714

For students of Chinese art and culture this anthology has proven invaluable since its initial publication in 1985. It collects important Chinese writings about painting, from the earliest examples through the fourteenth century, allowing readers to see how the art of this rich era was seen and understood in the artists’ own times. Some of the texts in this treasury fall into the broad category of aesthetic theory; some describe specific techniques; some discuss the work of individual artists. The texts are presented in accurate and readable translations, and prefaced with artistic and historical background information to the formative periods of Chinese theory and criticism. A glossary of terms and an appendix containing brief biographies of 270 artists and critics add to the usefulness of this volume.
History

Order in Early Chinese Excavated Texts

Author: Zhongjiang Wang

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 213

Recently discovered ancient silk and bamboo manuscripts have transformed our understanding of classical Chinese thought. In this book, Wang Zhongjiang closely examines these texts and, by parsing the complex divergence between ancient and modern Chinese records, reveals early Chinese philosophy to be much richer and more complex than we ever imagined. As numerous and varied cosmologies sprang up in this cradle of civilization, beliefs in the predictable movements of nature merged with faith in gods and their divine punishments. Slowly, powerful spirits and gods were stripped of their potency as nature's constant order awakened people to the possibility of universal laws, and those laws finally gave birth to an ideally conceived community, objectively managed and rationally ordered.
History

Rewriting Early Chinese Texts

Author: Edward L. Shaughnessy

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 751

Explores the rewriting of early Chinese texts in the wake of new archaeological evidence.
Literary Criticism

The Embodied Text

Author: Matthias L. Richter

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 359

In The Embodied Text Matthias L. Richter demonstrates how early Chinese manuscript texts can reliably be established on the basis of their material representation rather than on grounds of similarities with other texts.
Philosophy

Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought

Author: Alexus McLeod

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 829

Contemporary scholars of Chinese philosophy often presuppose that early China possessed a naturalistic worldview, devoid of any non-natural concepts, such as transcendence. Challenging this presupposition head-on, Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod argue that non-naturalism and transcendence have a robust and significant place in early Chinese thought. This book reveals that non-naturalist positions can be found in early Chinese texts, in topics including conceptions of the divine, cosmogony, and apophatic philosophy. Moreover, by closely examining a range of early Chinese texts, and providing comparative readings of a number of Western texts and thinkers, the book offers a way of reading early Chinese Philosophy as consistent with the religious philosophy of the East and West, including the Abrahamic and the Brahmanistic religions. Co-written by a philosopher and theologian, this book draws out unique insights into early Chinese thought, highlighting in particular new ways to consider a range of Chinese concepts, including tian, dao, li, and you/wu.
Literary Criticism

Articulated Ladies

Author: Paul F. Rouzer

Publisher: Harvard Univ Asia Center

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 424

View: 671

The essays focus on what these writings can tell us not only about gender relations but also about the ways in which these male authors attempted to define themselves and their place in the political and social world."--BOOK JACKET.
Social Science

Text and Ritual in Early China

Author: Martin Kern

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 362

View: 138

In Text and Ritual in Early China, leading scholars of ancient Chinese history, literature, religion, and archaeology consider the presence and use of texts in religious and political ritual. Through balanced attention to both the received literary tradition and the wide range of recently excavated artifacts, manuscripts, and inscriptions, their combined efforts reveal the rich and multilayered interplay of textual composition and ritual performance. Drawn across disciplinary boundaries, the resulting picture illuminates two of the defining features of early Chinese culture and advances new insights into their sumptuous complexity. Beginning with a substantial introduction to the conceptual and thematic issues explored in succeeding chapters, Text and Ritual in Early China is anchored by essays on early Chinese cultural history and ritual display (Michael Nylan) and the nature of its textuality (William G. Boltz). This twofold approach sets the stage for studies of the E Jun Qi metal tallies (Lothar von Falkenhausen), the Gongyang commentary to The Spring and Autumn Annals (Joachim Gentz), the early history of The Book of Odes (Martin Kern), moral remonstration in historiography (David Schaberg), the �Liming� manuscript text unearthed at Mawangdui (Mark Csikszentmihalyi), and Eastern Han commemorative stele inscriptions (K. E. Brashier). The scholarly originality of these essays rests firmly on their authors� control over ancient sources, newly excavated materials, and modern scholarship across all major Sinological languages. The extensive bibliography is in itself a valuable and reliable reference resource. This important work will be required reading for scholars of Chinese history, language, literature, philosophy, religion, art history, and archaeology.
Philosophy

The Mozi as an Evolving Text

Author: Carine Defoort

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 294

View: 774

The book "Mozi," named after master Mo, was compiled in the course of the fifth-third centuries BCE. The seven studies included in the "The" Mozi "as an Evolving Text" analyse the Core Chapters, Dialogues, and Opening Chapters of the "Mozi" as an evolving text.
Philosophy

Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought

Author: Alexus McLeod

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 388

Contemporary scholars of Chinese philosophy often presuppose that early China possessed a naturalistic worldview, devoid of any non-natural concepts, such as transcendence. Challenging this presupposition head-on, Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod argue that non-naturalism and transcendence have a robust and significant place in early Chinese thought. This book reveals that non-naturalist positions can be found in early Chinese texts, in topics including conceptions of the divine, cosmogony, and apophatic philosophy. Moreover, by closely examining a range of early Chinese texts, and providing comparative readings of a number of Western texts and thinkers, the book offers a way of reading early Chinese Philosophy as consistent with the religious philosophy of the East and West, including the Abrahamic and the Brahmanistic religions. Co-written by a philosopher and theologian, this book draws out unique insights into early Chinese thought, highlighting in particular new ways to consider a range of Chinese concepts, including tian, dao, li, and you/wu.
History

Pulse Diagnosis in Early Chinese Medicine

Author: Elisabeth Hsu

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 773

A study of the earliest extensive account of Chinese pulse diagnosis, focusing on a biography of Chunyu Yi.
Medical

Early Chinese Medical Literature

Author: Donald John Harper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 549

View: 132

Discovered in 1973, in the richest cache of ancient manuscripts ever unearthed in China, the seven medical manuscripts from Mawangdui Tomb 3 in Changsha, Hunan Province, are certain to transform the study of early Chinese medicine. The manuscripts were buried in 168 B.C. along with their owner, a man who belonged to the local elite. The medical manuscripts reveal for the first time the breadth of medical knowledge in third and early-second century B.C. China. There is also unprecedented documentation of magic in the medical manuscripts, of the use of incantations, rituals, and charms to treat ailments and to serve other human needs. Donald Harper's translation of the Mawangdui medical manuscripts is the first complete translation in any language. Based on the photographic reproduction of the manuscripts and transcription published in Chinese in Beijing in 1985, the translation is thoroughly annotated and incorporates corrections of transcription errors in the Beijing edition. In addition, Harper provides new transcriptions of three texts based on textual evidence that became available after publication of the Beijing edition. Thus, this book provides the most accurate representation of these remarkable manuscripts.
Social Science

Early Chinese Religion

Author: John Lagerwey

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1

View: 350

After the Warring States, treated in Part One of this set, there is no more fecund era in Chinese religious and cultural history than the period of division (220-589 AD). During it, Buddhism conquered China, Daoism grew into a mature religion with independent institutions, and, together with Confucianism, these three teachings, having each won its share of state recognition and support, formed a united front against shamanism. While all four religions are covered, Buddhism and Daoism receive special attention in a series of parallel chapters on their pantheons, rituals, sacred geography, community organization, canon formation, impact on literature, and recent archaeological discoveries. This multi-disciplinary approach, without ignoring philosophical and theological issues, brings into sharp focus the social and historical matrices of Chinese religion.
Medical

Ancient Chinese Medical Texts On Acupuncture For Western Readers

Author: Muhammad Wolfgang G. A. Schmidt

Publisher: disserta Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 508

View: 603

The Suwen and the Lingshu form part of the Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine with the Nanjing as a separate work complementing this classic. These texts are the first known texts on Chinese acupuncture with an age of over 2000 years. Regarded as ancient authoritative texts, they are still held in high esteem by today’s Chinese and Western acupuncturists and are mandatory texts of study in the training of Western and Chinese acupuncture physicians. Western readers naturally face tremendous difficulties in accessing these original texts because of the language and cultural gap between their contemporary Western cultural background and ancient Chinese culture. This edition of the Chinese texts therefore includes simplified and traditional Chinese character versions of the texts that will enable the reader to study text versions in simplified characters published on the Chinese Mainland as well as those in traditional character versions published outside the Chinese Mainland in Taiwan or Hongkong. Complete Latin transcription in Hanyu Pinyin has been added to the Chinese character versions for all the texts so that the reader does not need to spend much time in looking up unknown Chinese characters in the texts. A comprehensive Chinese-English character and word glossary, generated and compiled from the Chinese text corpus in this book, is appended at the end of the book for easy reference by Western readers.
History

Violence, Kinship and the Early Chinese State

Author: Roderick Campbell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 321

The violence of war and sacrifice were not the antithesis of civilization at Shang Anyang, but rather its foundation.