Fiction

Eight Great Hebrew Short Novels

Author: Alan Lelchuk

Publisher: Plume

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 392

View: 683

Novels portray the Jewish experience, including family life, the experiences of new immigrants, the misery of war, and the difficulties of Israeli-Arab relations
Religion

Eve's Journey

Author: Nehama Aschkenasy

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 986

In Eve's Journey, Nehama Aschkenasy traces the migration of several female images and feminine situations from their early appearances in Biblical writings to their incarnations in modern Hebraic literature. Focusing on the evolution of early female archetypes and prototypes, Aschkenasy uncovers the ancient roots of modern female characters and traces the changing cultural perceptions of women in Hebraic letters. The author draws on the vast body of Hebraic literary documents to illustrate how the female character is a mirror of her times as well as being a product of her creator''s imagination and conception of the woman's role in society and in fiction. The historical spectrum, provided by a discussion of Biblical narratives, Midrashic sources, documents of the Jewish mystics, Hasidic tales, and modern Hebrew works, allows an understanding of the metamorphosis that the female figure has experienced in her literary odyssey.
History

Israeli Mythogynies

Author: Esther Fuchs

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 229

This book is the first to systematically examine the representation of women by mainstream Hebrew authors from the Palmah Generation to the New Wave. Fuchs’ unique analytical method exposes the male-centered bias which often inspires the works of such prominent and widely translated authors as S. Yizhar, Moshe Shamir, A. B. Yehoshua and Amos Oz. She exposes both the continuities and the transformations in the literary representations of women and explains them in innovative ways, grounded in aesthetic, social, political, and cultural conditions and ideologies. The bold and unexpected discoveries offered by this book illuminate the complex ways in which Israel’s political predicaments, for example, affect the representation of women, as well as the various ways in which Israeli literature uses female images to express the anxiety and frustration arising from these predicaments. This pioneering study will be invaluable to feminist literary critics, scholars, and teachers and students of modern Hebrew literature.
Literary Criticism

The Centrifugal Novel

Author: Shemuel Kats

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 219

View: 815

The study addresses a number of issues, among them the importance that manuscripts and text editing have in our comprehension of fiction; how Agnon composed some of his short works, lending them an indeterminacy and force to serve as comments on the human condition. In addition, the final chapters demonstrate several approaches to the interpretation of A Guest for the Night from thematic, linguistic, and intratextual perspectives.
History

Major Turning Points in Jewish Intellectual History

Author: D. Aberbach

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 700

This book analyzes major transformations in Jewish life and thought: from idolatry to exclusive monotheism in the biblical age, from state-based identity to cultural nationalism in the Roman empire; and, in the European Diaspora, from theology to secularism and revived political nationalism in the modern period. Fundamental questions are asked about Jewish survival in a variety of topics including prophecy, Jewish law, Midrash, the Roman-Jewish wars, Stoicism, secular poetry in Muslim Spain, Marx and Freud, and Hebrew literature through the ages.
History

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Jewish Writers of the Twentieth Century

Author: Sorrel Kerbel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 702

View: 115

Now available in paperback for the first time, Jewish Writers of the Twentieth Century is both a comprehensive reference resource and a springboard for further study. This volume: examines canonical Jewish writers, less well-known authors of Yiddish and Hebrew, and emerging Israeli writers includes entries on figures as diverse as Marcel Proust, Franz Kafka, Tristan Tzara, Eugene Ionesco, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, Arthur Miller, Saul Bellow, Nadine Gordimer, and Woody Allen contains introductory essays on Jewish-American writing, Holocaust literature and memoirs, Yiddish writing, and Anglo-Jewish literature provides a chronology of twentieth-century Jewish writers. Compiled by expert contributors, this book contains over 330 entries on individual authors, each consisting of a biography, a list of selected publications, a scholarly essay on their work and suggestions for further reading.
Religion

Jewish Cultural Nationalism

Author: David Aberbach

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 144

View: 461

Jewish Cultural Nationalism explores the development of Jewish nationalism from the Bible to modern times, focusing on particular movements and places as well as texts which signified, or themselves brought about, change: the Bible (Hebrew prayer book), and the modern Hebrew literature, particularly in Tsarist Russia. While the influence of the Hebrew Bible alone on nationalism in individual periods has been subject to much scholarly study, the present work is unusual in its emphasis on the continuity of Jewish cultural nationalism and its influences through Hebrew texts.
History

Nationalism, War and Jewish Education

Author: David Aberbach

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 860

Nationalism, War and Jewish Education explores historical circumstances leading to the emergence of a Jewish religious school system lasting to modern times and the process by which this system was broken down and adapted in secular form as Jewish nationalism grew in the 19th and early 20th centuries. In the Roman period, education became an essential part of rabbinic pacifist accommodation following Jewish defeats, while in the modern period, secular education was associated with nationalism and increasing militancy of emerging states. In both periods there was a revival of Hebrew and the creation of an educational system based on Hebrew texts. Both revivals were responses to anti-Semitism, which pushed large numbers of Jews away from assimilation into the dominant culture to a renewed Jewish national identity. The book highlights the centrifugal and centripetal shifts in Jewish identity, from messianic militarism to pacifism and back. It shows how changes in Jewish education accompanied these shifts. While drawing on historical scholarship for background, this book is essentially a literary study, showing how literary changes at different times and places reflect historical, socio-psychological, economic and political change. Nationalism, War and Jewish Education is original in showing how ancient Jewish education affected modern Jewish society, therefore it is a valuable resource for students and researchers interested in Jewish history and literature, education, development studies and nationalism.
Literary Criticism

Women of the Word

Author: Judith Dishon

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 382

View: 494

While individual essays reveal literary discoveries of self and forgings of identity by women rising to the opportunities and challenges of drastically altered Jewish social realities, a significant number also show the sad decline of women writers upon whom silence was reimposed. Several chapters consider how Jewish women were depicted by male writers from the Middle Ages through the mid-nineteenth century.
History

Review Essays in Israel Studies

Author: Laura Zittrain Eisenberg

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 879

Introduces the cutting edge issues and current scholarship in the interdisciplinary field of Israel Studies.
Religion

Mapping Jewish Identities

Author: Laurence J. Silberstein

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 105

Is Jewish identity flourishing or in decline? Community leaders and scholarly researchers continually seek to determine the attitudes, beliefs, and activities that best measure Jewish identity. At issue, according to these studies, is the very survival of the Jewish community itself. But such studies rarely ask what actually is being examined when we attempt to assess "Jewish identity" or any identity. Most tend to assume that identity is a preexisting, relatively fixed frame of reference reflecting shared cultural and historical experiences. Drawing on recent work in such fields as cultural studies, poststructuralist theory, postmodern philosophy, and feminist theory, Mapping Jewish Identities challenges this premise. Contesting conventional approaches to Jewish identity, contributors argue that Jewish identity should be conceptualized as an ongoing dynamic process of "becoming" in response to changing cultural and social conditions rather than as a stable defining body of traits. Contributors, including Daniel Boyarin, Laura Levitt, Adi Ophir, and Gordon Bearn, examine such topics as American Jews' desires to connect with a lost immigrant past through photography, the complicated function of the Holocaust in the identity formation of contemporary Jews, the impact of the struggle with the Palestinians on Israeli group identity construction, and the ways in which repressed voices such as those of women, Mizrahim, and Israeli Arabs have changed our ways of thinking about Jewish and Israeli identity.
Religion

Women and Judaism

Author: Frederick E. Greenspahn

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 268

View: 819

Although women constitute half of the Jewish population and have always played essential roles in ensuring Jewish continuity and the preservation of Jewish beliefs and values, only recently have their contributions and achievements received sustained scholarly attention. Scholars have begun to investigate Jewish women’s domestic, economic, intellectual, spiritual, and creative roles in Jewish life from biblical times to the present. Yet little of this important work has filtered down beyond specialists in their respective academic fields. Women and Judaism brings the broad new insights they have uncovered to the world. Women and Judaism communicates this research to a wider public of students and educated readers outside of the academy by presenting accessible and engaging chapters written by key senior scholars that introduce the reader to different aspects of women and Judaism. The contributors discuss feminist approaches to Jewish law and Torah study, the spirituality of Eastern European Jewish women, Jewish women in American literature, and many other issues. Contributors: Nehama Aschkenasy, Judith R. Baskin, Sylvia Barack Fishman, Harriet Pass Freidenreich, Esther Fuchs, Judith Hauptman, Sara R. Horowitz, Renée Levine, Pamela S. Nadell, and Dvora Weisberg.
Literary Criticism

Israeli Writers Consider the "outsider"

Author: Leon I. Yudkin

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 143

View: 355

A society can be judged by its attitude to those who are outside or disadvantaged by reason of class, sex, race, language, background, disability, and so on. This volume seeks to address the models of otherness that exist in Israeli literature.
Religion

Booking Passage

Author: Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 370

View: 194

Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi's sweeping study of modern Jewish writing is in many ways a long meditation on the thematics of geography in Jewish culture, what she calls the "poetics of exile and return." Until the late nineteenth century, Jews were identified in their own religious and poetic imagination as wanderers and exiles, their sacred center–Jerusalem, Zion–fatefully out of reach. Opening the book with "Jewish Journeys," Ezrahi begins by examining the work of medieval Hebrew poet Yehuda Halevi to chart a journey whose end was envisioned as the sublime realignment of the people with their original center. When the Holy Land became the site of a political drama of return in the nineteenth century, Jewish writing reflected the shift, traced here in the travel fictions of S.Y. Abramovitsh, S.Y. Agnon, and Sholem Aleichem. In "Jewish Geographies" Ezrahi explores aspects of reterritorialization through memory in the post-Holocaust writing of Paul Celan, Dan Pagis, Aharon Appelfeld, I.B. Singer and Philip Roth. Europe, where Jews had dreamed of return, has become the new ruined shrine: The literary pilgrimages of these writers recall familiar patterns of grieving and representation and a tentative reinvention of the diasporic imagination–in America, of course, but, paradoxically, even in Zion.
Religion

Agnon's Art of Indirection

Author: Nitza Ben-Dov

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 167

View: 603

This study demonstrates how Agnon combined traditional Hebrew lore, modern literary devices and, especially, highly crafted dream-sequences revealing subconscious motivations behind apparently fortuitous acts and decisions, thus creating a unique narrative form reflecting the "indeterminacy" of human behaviour.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Author: Peter France

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 656

View: 604

Translation has been a crucial process in world culture over the past two millennia and more. In the English-speaking cultures many of the most important texts are translations, from Homer to Beckett, the Bible to Freud. Although recent years have seen a boom in translation studies, there hasbeen no comprehensive yet convenient guide to this essential element of literature in English.Written by eminent scholars from many countries, the Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation meets this need and will be essential reading for all students of English and comparative literature. It highlights the place of translation in our culture, encouraging awareness of the issuesraised, making the translator more 'visible'. Concentrating on major writers and works, it covers translations out of many languages, from Greek to Korean, from Swahili to Russian. For some works (e.g. Virgil's Aeneid) which have been much translated, the discussion is historical and critical,showing how translation has evolved over the centuries and bringing out the differences between versions. Elsewhere, with less familiar literatures, the Guide examines the extent to which translation has done justice to the range of work available.The Guide is divided into two parts. Part I contains substantial essays on theoretical questions, a pioneering outline of the history of translation into English, and discussions of the problems raised by specific types of text (e.g. poetry, oral literature). The second, much longer, part consistsof entries grouped by language of origin; some are devoted to individual texts (e.g. the Thousand and One Nights) or writers (e.g. Ibsen, Proust), but the majority offer a critical overview of a genre (e.g. Chinese poetry, Spanish Golden Age drama) or of a national literature (e.g. Hungarian,Scottish Gaelic). There is a selective bibliography for each entry and an index of authors and translators.
Biography & Autobiography

World Authors, 1975-1980

Author: Vineta Colby

Publisher: New York : Wilson

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 829

View: 396

Offers profiles of hundreds of authors, and includes brief descriptions of each writer's major works