Literary Criticism

Invoking Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Imagination

Author: Srividhya Swaminathan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 817

In the eighteenth century, audiences in Great Britain understood the term ’slavery’ to refer to a range of physical and metaphysical conditions beyond the transatlantic slave trade. Literary representations of slavery encompassed tales of Barbary captivity, the ’exotic’ slaving practices of the Ottoman Empire, the political enslavement practiced by government or church, and even the harsh life of servants under a cruel master. Arguing that literary and cultural studies have focused too narrowly on slavery as a term that refers almost exclusively to the race-based chattel enslavement of sub-Saharan Africans transported to the New World, the contributors suggest that these analyses foreclose deeper discussion of other associations of the term. They suggest that the term slavery became a powerful rhetorical device for helping British audiences gain a new perspective on their own position with respect to their government and the global sphere. Far from eliding the real and important differences between slave systems operating in the Atlantic world, this collection is a starting point for understanding how slavery as a concept came to encompass many forms of unfree labor and metaphorical bondage precisely because of the power of association.
History

Eighteenth-century White Slaves: Pennsylvania, 1729-1760

Author:

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 792

The first of four volumes providing a full collection of advertisements for runaway indentured servants, this volume provides a valuable source of information about unfree white classes in early America.
History

Slavery and Freedom in the Rural North

Author: Graham Russell Hodges

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 221

This unique social history, focusing on a single community in eastern New jersey, addresses many long-held assumptions about slavery and emancipation outside the plantation South.
Literary Criticism

Teaching the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century

Author: Jennifer Frangos

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 986

The central axiom of Teaching the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century is that the classroom functions as a site for research and collaboration: not only as a space that reflects the research of individual teacher-scholars, but as a generative site to put ideas, theories, and methodologies into play. Whereas transatlanticism has transformed research practices over the last decade, the present collection is concerned with exploring what this transformation looks like in the classroom, and how the classroom continues to shape research practices in the field. Contributors address issues such as how the traffic in ideas, people, and commodities between Europe, Africa, and the New World are considered in classroom settings; how inter- and intra-departmental collaborations reshape our approaches to teaching the eighteenth century; how and why Transatlantic Studies can function as an introduction to college study; and how it can help more advanced students to revise their notions of nation, place, and identity. By now, there are a number of anthologies available to help instructors determine what transatlantic material to teach, but none that engage why and how to teach it, or what teaching it can do for us, our students, and our profession. Rather than simply providing reading lists or a collection of anecdotes about lesson plans, Teaching the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century emphasizes theorizing critical engagements with, interdisciplinary focus on, and the transformative potential of Transatlantic Studies. The primary market for Teaching the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century is university, college, and community college professors, researchers, and students, with three specific subgroups: 1. Teachers new to Transatlantic Studies Teachers coming to Transatlantic Studies for the first time will find both suggestions for materials or topical units to be integrated into existing courses (e.g., a unit on transatlantic exchange that could figure in an eighteenth-century literature survey course) and ideas for developing new courses altogether. 2. Teachers already teaching and/or researching in the field of Transatlantic Studies Such scholars will find material to broaden their approach to familiar courses and subjects: inter- or cross-disciplinary focus, new texts, successful clusterings of texts or themes or approaches, and ideas for team-teaching or linking courses with other faculty. 3. Teachers involved in Transatlantic Studies programs, especially those that focus on contemporary/Post WWII context (e.g., at the University of Dundee, the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, and the University of Birmingham) Teaching the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century will provide historical context for current geopolitical studies: perspective on the dynamics and historical and political forces occurring in the eighteenth century and contributing to 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century politics, nations, and paradigms.
Minorities and journalism

Every Picture Tells a Story

Author: Robert Ernest Desrochers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Minorities and journalism

Page: 373

View: 734

This dissertation attempts to understand what slavery meant to white and black New Englanders in the eighteenth century, and specifically to explain how the social and cultural matrix of print mediated the experience and significance of slavery in New England before the age of Garrisonian abolitionism. Slavery and the public press grew up together in eighteenth-century New England, in a synergetic and contradictory relationship that profoundly altered the course of race relations there and in the United States. The idioms of power white New Englanders devised to regulate, recount, and otherwise control black lives in print served of course and above all to maintain slavery and white dominance. Over time New England's print discourse of slavery also helped make the institution an important symbol of culture, community, and social identity. The mental maps created by advertisements, anecdotes, narratives, and other printed matter ritually connected white New Englanders to one another and enabled them to imagine their role within the mainstream of the larger English Atlantic world in terms of a baseline of various shared experiences with slavery and slaves. Ultimately, though, the stories whites told each other about those experiences undermined confidence in the system as often and as much as they inspired it, revealing time and again the limits of white mastery over print and slaves. With a keen sense of the versatility of language and the genius of human expression, the dissertation shows how Afro-New Englanders broke the imposed silences and turned the tools of oppression--linguistic and otherwise--on their head, forging expansive and resilient identities, cultures, and communities of their own. In short "Every Picture" tells the story of the close constitutive relationship between slavery and print in New England from its colonial origins through the early years of the federal republic. It is a dynamic tale of exploitation and subversion, of cold commodification and bold assertions of self, of the coercive limits and ironic possibilities of language, of lives and worlds in motion, of survival and the struggle to be free. It is the story of the rise, fall, and legacy of New England slavery.
History

Unfreedom

Author: Jared Ross Hardesty

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 442

Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 2016 In Unfreedom, Jared Ross Hardesty examines the lived experience of slaves in eighteenth-century Boston. Instead of relying on the traditional dichotomy of slavery and freedom, Hardesty argues we should understand slavery in Boston as part of a continuum of unfreedom. In this context, African slavery existed alongside many other forms of oppression, including Native American slavery, indentured servitude, apprenticeship, and pauper apprenticeship. In this hierarchical and inherently unfree world, enslaved Bostonians were more concerned with their everyday treatment and honor than with emancipation, as they pushed for autonomy, protected their families and communities, and demanded a place in society. Drawing on exhaustive research in colonial legal records – including wills, court documents, and minutes of governmental bodies – as well as newspapers, church records, and other contemporaneous sources, Hardesty masterfully reconstructs an eighteenth-century Atlantic world of unfreedom that stretched from Europe to Africa to America. By reassessing the lives of enslaved Bostonians as part of a social order structured by ties of dependence, Hardesty not only demonstrates how African slaves were able to decode their new homeland and shape the terms of their enslavement, but also tells the story of how marginalized peoples engrained themselves in the very fabric of colonial American society.
Literary Criticism

The Cambridge Companion to Slavery in American Literature

Author: Ezra Tawil

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 785

This book brings together leading scholars to examine slavery in American literature from the eighteenth century to the present day.
History

The History of White People

Author: Nell Irvin Painter

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 781

A New York Times bestseller: “This terrific new book . . . [explores] the ‘notion of whiteness,’ an idea as dangerous as it is seductive.”—Boston Globe Telling perhaps the most important forgotten story in American history, eminent historian Nell Irvin Painter guides us through more than two thousand years of Western civilization, illuminating not only the invention of race but also the frequent praise of “whiteness” for economic, scientific, and political ends. A story filled with towering historical figures, The History of White People closes a huge gap in literature that has long focused on the non-white and forcefully reminds us that the concept of “race” is an all-too-human invention whose meaning, importance, and reality have changed as it has been driven by a long and rich history of events.