Literary Criticism

Envisioning Disease, Gender, and War

Author: J. Fisher

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 797

This critical study illuminates the neglected intersection of war, disease, and gender as represented in an important subgenre of World War I literature. It calls into question public versus private perceptions of time, mass media, urban spaces, emotion, and the increasingly uncertain status of the future.
Literary Criticism

Envisioning Disease, Gender, and War

Author: J. Fisher

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 259

This critical study illuminates the neglected intersection of war, disease, and gender as represented in an important subgenre of World War I literature. It calls into question public versus private perceptions of time, mass media, urban spaces, emotion, and the increasingly uncertain status of the future.
Literary Criticism

Viral Modernism

Author: Elizabeth Outka

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 341

View: 823

The influenza pandemic of 1918–1919 took the lives of between 50 and 100 million people worldwide, and the United States suffered more casualties than in all the wars of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries combined. Yet despite these catastrophic death tolls, the pandemic faded from historical and cultural memory in the United States and throughout Europe, overshadowed by World War One and the turmoil of the interwar period. In Viral Modernism, Elizabeth Outka reveals the literary and cultural impact of one of the deadliest plagues in history, bringing to light how it shaped canonical works of fiction and poetry. Outka shows how and why the contours of modernism shift when we account for the pandemic’s hidden but widespread presence. She investigates the miasmic manifestations of the pandemic and its spectral dead in interwar Anglo-American literature, uncovering the traces of an outbreak that brought a nonhuman, invisible horror into every community. Viral Modernism examines how literature and culture represented the virus’s deathly fecundity, as writers wrestled with the scope of mass death in the domestic sphere amid fears of wider social collapse. Outka analyzes overt treatments of the pandemic by authors like Katherine Anne Porter and Thomas Wolfe and its subtle presence in works by Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and W. B. Yeats. She uncovers links to the disease in popular culture, from early zombie resurrection to the resurgence of spiritualism. Viral Modernism brings the pandemic to the center of the era, revealing a vast tragedy that has hidden in plain sight.
History

Historians Without Borders

Author: Lawrence Abrams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 381

This text explores a variety of themes developed from successive years of the University of California, Davis, multidisciplinary graduate conference. It draws out connections on a wide array of topics among the arts, humanities, and sciences in history for multidisciplinary study. This text presents a rare forum for multidisciplinary connections researched and presented by junior specialists in their respective fields. It enables both creativity and flexibility in drawing out connections that are frequently overlooked by more specialized senior scholars. This book is a unique exercise in the promotion of junior scholarly achievement and multidisciplinary research.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Teaching Representations of the First World War

Author: Debra Rae Cohen

Publisher: Modern Language Association

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 440

View: 796

The First World War saw staggering loss of life and was a catalyst for many political and social changes. It was also shaped by the media and art forms that expressed it: film, photography, poetry, memoir, posters, advertisements, and music. This volume's scope shows that today's instructors contend with many different issues in teaching the First World War in a variety of classroom settings. Among these issues are the war's relation to modernism; global reach in the Middle East and South Asia; influence on psychiatry, pacifism, and consumer culture; and effect on public health and the 1918 influenza pandemic.
Literary Criticism

Pandemic Influenza in Fiction

Author: Charles De Paolo

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 990

The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919--the worst widespread outbreak in recorded history--claimed an estimated 100 million lives globally. Yet only in recent decades has it captured the attention of historians, scientists, and fiction writers. This study surveys influenza research over the last century in original scientific and historical documents and establishes a critical paradigm for the appreciation of influenza fiction. Through close readings of 15 imaginative works, the author elucidates the contents of and the interaction between the medical and the fictional. Coverage extends from Pfeiffer's 1892 bacillus theory, to the multidisciplinary effort to isolate the virus (1919-1933), to the reconstruction of the H1N1 viral genome from archival and exhumed RNA (1995-2005), to the emergence of H5N1 and H7N9 avian viruses (1997-2014).This book demonstrates that pandemic fiction has been more than a therapeutic medium for survivors. A prodigious resource for the history of medicine, it is also a forum for ethical, social, legal, national defense and public health issues.
Literary Criticism

Modernism and Physical Illness

Author: Peter Fifield

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 272

View: 895

T. S. Eliot memorably said that separation of the man who suffers from the mind that creates is the root of good poetry. This book argues that this is wrong. Beginning from Virginia Woolf's 'On Being Ill', it demonstrates that modernism is, on the contrary, invested in physical illness as a subject, method, and stylizing force. Experience of physical ailments, from the fleeting to the fatal, the familiar to the unusual, structures the writing of the modernists, both as sufferers and onlookers. Illness reorients the relation to, and appearance of, the world, making it appear newly strange; it determines the character of human interactions and models of behaviour. As a topic, illness requires new ways of writing and thinking, altered ideas of the subject, and a re-examination of the roles of invalids and carers. This book reads the work five authors, who are also known for their illness, hypochondria, or medical work: D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Dorothy Richardson, and Winifred Holtby. It overturns the assumption that illness is a simple obstacle to creativity and instead argues that it is a subject of careful thought and cultural significance.
Literary Criticism

Apocalypse in American Literature and Culture

Author: John Hay

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 266

The idea of America has always encouraged apocalyptic visions. The 'American Dream' has not only imagined the prospect of material prosperity; it has also imagined the end of the world. 'Final forecasts' constitute one of America's oldest literary genres, extending from the eschatological theology of the New England Puritans to the revolutionary discourse of the early republic, the emancipatory rhetoric of the Civil War, the anxious fantasies of the atomic age, and the doomsday digital media of today. For those studying the history of America, renditions of the apocalypse are simply unavoidable. This book brings together two dozen essays by prominent scholars that explore the meanings of apocalypse across different periods, regions, genres, registers, modes, and traditions of American literature and culture. It locates the logic and rhetoric of apocalypse at the very core of American literary history.
History

Pandemic 1918

Author: Catharine Arnold

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 446

In the dying months of World War I, Spanish flu suddenly overwhelmed the world, killing between 50 and 100 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers called it Flanders Grippe, but globally the pandemic gained the notorious title of 'Spanish Flu'. Nowhere escaped this common enemy: in Britain, 250,000 people died, in the United States it was 750,000, five times its total military fatalities in the war, while European deaths reached over two million. The numbers are staggering. And yet at the time, news of the danger was suppressed for fear of impacting war-time morale. Even today these figures are shocking to many - the war still hiding this terrifying menace in its shadow. And behind the numbers are human lives, stories of those who suffered and fought it - in the hospitals and laboratories. Catharine Arnold traces the course of the disease, its origins and progress, across the globe via these remarkable people. Some are well known to us, like British Prime Minister David Lloyd George, US President Woodrow Wilson, and writers Robert Graves and Vera Brittain, but many more are unknown. They are the doughboys from the US, gold miners in South Africa, schoolgirls in Great Britain and many others. Published 100 years after the most devastating pandemic in world history, Pandemic 1918 uses previously unpublished records, memoirs, diaries and government publications to uncover the human story of 1918.
History

American Health Crisis

Author: Martin Halliwell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 890

A history of U.S. public health emergencies and how we can turn the tide. Despite enormous advances in medical science and public health education over the last century, access to health care remains a dominant issue in American life. U.S. health care is often hailed as the best in the world, yet the public health emergencies of today often echo the public health emergencies of yesterday: consider the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918–19 and COVID-19, the displacement of the Dust Bowl and the havoc of Hurricane Maria, the Reagan administration’s antipathy toward the AIDS epidemic and the lack of accountability during the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. Spanning the period from the presidency of Woodrow Wilson to that of Donald Trump, American Health Crisis illuminates how—despite the elevation of health care as a human right throughout the world—vulnerable communities in the United States continue to be victimized by structural inequalities across disparate geographies, income levels, and ethnic groups. Martin Halliwell views contemporary public health crises through the lens of historical and cultural revisionings, suturing individual events together into a narrative of calamity that has brought us to our current crisis in health politics. American Health Crisis considers the future of public health in the United States and, presenting a reinvigorated concept of health citizenship, argues that now is the moment to act for lasting change.
Antiques & Collectibles

Historical And Literary Perspectives Of Humanity During Pandemic

Author: Dr. Pushpa Dixit

Publisher: RED'SHINE Publication. Pvt. Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 206

View: 183

Literature, throughout human history to till date, has reflected different societies grappling with a wide range of issues including political, social, environmental, gender, educational, religious and psychological conflicts. Literature also shed light on the spread of various diseases and epidemics. It has represented the height of human fears amid the spread of various pandemics which we are facing in the time of Covid-19.
Psychology

Global Pandemics and Epistemic Crises in Psychology

Author: Martin Dege

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 182

View: 922

Using COVID-19 as a base, this groundbreaking book brings together several renowned scholars to explore the concept of crisis, and how this global event has shaped the discipline of psychology. It engages directly with the challenges that psychology continues to face when theorizing societal issues of gender, race, class, history, and culture, while not disregarding "lived" experiences. This edited volume offers a set of pathways to rethink psychology beyond its current scope and history to become more apt to the conditions, needs, and demands of the 21st century. The book explores topics like resilience, interpersonal relationships, mistrust in the government, and access to healthcare. Dividing the book into three distinct sections, the contributors first examine the current crisis within psychology, then go on to explore how psychology theorizes the subject and the other in a social world of perpetual political, economic, cultural, and social crises, and lastly consider the role of crises in the creation of new theorizing. This is essential reading for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of theoretical and philosophical psychology, social psychology, community psychology, and developmental psychology.
History

The War Within

Author: Alexis Peri

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 700

Winner of the Pushkin House Russian Book Prize Winner of the AATSEEL Book Prize Winner of the University of Southern California Book Prize Honorable Mention, Reginald Zelnik Book Prize “Stand aside, Homer. I doubt whether even the author of the Iliad could have matched Alexis Peri’s account of the 872-day siege which Leningrad endured.” —Jonathan Mirsky, The Spectator “Fascinating and perceptive.” —Antony Beevor, New York Review of Books “Powerful and illuminating...A fascinating, insightful, and nuanced work.” —Anna Reid, Times Literary Supplement “A sensitive, at times almost poetic examination.” —Robert Legvold, Foreign Affairs In September 1941, two and a half months after the Nazis invaded the Soviet Union, the German Wehrmacht encircled Leningrad. Cut off from the rest of Russia, the city remained blockaded for 872 days, at a cost of almost a million civilian lives. It was one of the longest and deadliest sieges in modern history. The War Within chronicles the Leningrad blockade from the perspective of those who endured it. Drawing on unpublished diaries written by men and women from all walks of life, Alexis Peri tells the tragic story of how young and old struggled to make sense of a world collapsing around them. When the blockade was lifted in 1944, Kremlin officials censored publications describing the ordeal and arrested many of Leningrad’s wartime leaders. Some were executed. Diaries—now dangerous to their authors—were concealed in homes, shelved in archives, and forgotten. The War Within recovers these lost accounts, shedding light on one of World War II’s darkest episodes while paying tribute the resilience of the human spirit.
History

Envisioning New Jersey

Author: Maxine N. Lurie

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 651

Winner of the 2017 New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance Author Award, Reference Category See New Jersey history as you read about it! Envisioning New Jersey brings together 650 spectacular images that illuminate the course of the state’s history, from prehistoric times to the present. Readers may think they know New Jersey’s history—the state’s increasing diversity, industrialization, and suburbanization—but the visual record presented here dramatically deepens and enriches that knowledge. Maxine N. Lurie and Richard F. Veit, two leading authorities on New Jersey history, present a smorgasbord of informative pictures, ranging from paintings and photographs to documents and maps. Portraits of George Washington and Molly Pitcher from the Revolution, battle flags from the War of 1812 and the Civil War, women air raid wardens patrolling the streets of Newark during World War II, the Vietnam War Memorial—all show New Jerseyans fighting for liberty. There are also pictures of Thomas Mundy Peterson, the first African American to vote after passage of the Fifteenth Amendment; Paul Robeson marching for civil rights; university students protesting in the 1960s; and Martin Luther King speaking at Monmouth University. The authors highlight the ethnic and religious variety of New Jersey inhabitants with images that range from Native American arrowheads and fishing implements, to Dutch and German buildings, early African American churches and leaders, and modern Catholic and Hindu houses of worship. Here, too, are the great New Jersey innovators from Thomas Edison to the Bell Labs scientists who worked on transistors. Compiled by the authors of New Jersey: A History of the Garden State, this volume is intended as an illustrated companion to that earlier volume. Envisioning New Jersey also stands on its own because essays synthesizing each era accompany the illustrations. A fascinating gold mine of images from the state’s past, Envisioning New Jersey is the first illustrated book on the Garden State that covers its complete history, capturing the amazing transformation of New Jersey over time. View sample pages (http://issuu.com/rutgersuniversitypress/docs/lurie_veit_envisioning_sample) Thanks to the New Jersey Historical Commission, the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, and generous individual donors for making this project possible.
Social Science

Gender for the Warfare State

Author: Robin Truth Goodman

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 194

View: 760

Gender for the Warfare State is the first scholarly investigation into the written works of U.S. women combat veterans in twenty-first century wars. Most recent studies quantify military participation, showing how many women participate in armed services and what their experiences are in a traditionally “male institution.” Many of these treatments regard women as victims solely of enemy fire, even as they are also often victims of their own military apparatus and of their own involvement in global aggression. By applying literary analysis to a sociological question, Gender for the Warfare State views women’s experiences through story and literary traditions that carry meaning into present practices. Goodman shows that women in combat are not just entering and being victimized in “male institutions,” but are also actively changing the story of gender and thus the structure of power that is constructed through gender. Moreover, this book unveils a new narrative of care that affects economic relations more broadly and the contemporary politics of the liberal social contract. Women’s participation in combat is not just a U.S. event but global and therefore has a deeper historical range than current sociological accounts imply. The book compares the political contexts of women’s entry into war now with their prior, twentieth-century contributions to wars in other cultural settings and then uses this comparison to show a variety of meanings at play in the gender of war.
Law

Re-envisioning Sovereignty

Author: Trudy Jacobsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 392

View: 439

Sovereignty, as a concept, is in a state of flux. In the course of the last century, traditional meanings have been worn away while the limitations of sovereignty have been altered as transnational issues compete with domestic concerns for precedence. This volume presents an interdisciplinary analysis of conceptions of sovereignty. Divided into six overarching elements, it explores a wide range of issues that have altered the theory and practice of state sovereignty, such as: human rights and the use of force for human protection purposes, norms relating to governance, the war on terror, economic globalization, the natural environment and changes in strategic thinking. The authors are acknowledged experts in their respective areas, and discuss the contemporary meaning and relevance of sovereignty and how it relates to the constitution of international order.
Social Science

Envisioning a Sustainable Society

Author: Lester W. Milbrath

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 403

View: 474

The evidence is increasingly persuasive. We are changing the way our planet's physical systems work--irrevocably. These changes are global and interconnected and unavoidable. They are upon us already, making it virtually impossible for any modern society to continue its present trajectory of growth. This book provides a penetrating analysis of how we have come to this point, of why science and technology will fail to solve these problems, and of how we as a society must change in order to avoid ecological catastrophe. The scope is broad, the urgency of the message is impossible to ignore.
Social Science

Gender and Parenting in the Worlds of Alien and Blade Runner

Author: Amanda DiGioia

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 676

Gender and Parenting in the Worlds of Alien and Blade Runner is a comparative, gendered analysis study of Ridley Scott’s contributions to the genre of science fiction and horror cinema, showcasing how patriarchal and gendered expectations regarding women, usually associated with the past, still run rampant.