Nature

Everett Ruess

Author: Conchita Ruess

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page:

View: 995

Everett Ruess--a bold teenage adventurer, artist, and writer--tramped around the Sierra Nevada, the California coast, and the desert wilderness of the Southwest between 1930 and 1934. At the age of 20, he mysteriously vanished into the barren Utah desert. Ruess has become an icon for modern-day adventurers and seekers. His search for ultimate beauty and adventure is chronicled in two books that contain remarkable collections of his writings, extracted from his journals and from letters written to family and friends. Both books are reprinted here in their entirety.
Biography & Autobiography

Everett Ruess

Author: W. L. Rusho

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 228

View: 357

Everett Ruess, the young poet and artist who disappeared into the desert canyonlands of Utah in 1934, has become widely known posthumously as the spokesman for the spirit of the high desert. Many have been inspired by his intense search for adventure, leaving behind the amenities of a comfortable life. His search for ultimate beauty and oneness with nature is chronicled in this remarkable collection of letters to family and friends.
History

Everett Ruess

Author: Philip L. Fradkin

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 302

Follows the story of Everett Ruess, a naturalist and artist of the early twentieth century whose disappearance sparked a myth of a romantic desert wanderer.
Literary Collections

Wilderness Journals of Everett Ruess

Author: Everett Ruess

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 216

View: 526

The poet records and reflects upon the landscapes and trials of his 1930s forays into the High Sierras and deserts of the Four Corners region
Biography & Autobiography

The Mystery of Everett Ruess

Author: W. L. Rusho

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 321

The story of Everett Ruess, who disappeared in the wilderness of Southern Utah in 1934, has for decades been one of the most intriguing mysteries of western lore. A Californian off on an adventure at age 20, he loved poetry, nature, art, and beauty. His family tracked his wanderings for four years, and then Everett disappeared without a trace. In 2008 an old Navajo Indian came forward with information that he had witnessed a murder in 1934, probably that of young Ruess. The bones were recovered, DNA testing was done, National Geographic Adventurer picked up the story, and the family reacted. In a new epilogue, author Rusho confronts the truth. W. L. Rusho's is a historian and expert on the life of Everett Ruess. His first book on Ruess was published in 1985, and he authored two (four, six, eight?) more books on the subject. Lifetime sales of Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty, have been 20,000 plus.
Literary Collections

On Desert Trails with Everett Ruess

Author: Everett Ruess

Publisher: Gibbs Smith Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 130

View: 861

9X12 In, 96 Pp, 45 Black & White Illustrations We Are Proud To Introduce This Handsome Commemorative Edition of On Desert Trails With Everett Ruess (First Introduced In Our 60, 000 Copy A Vagabond For Beauty), Which Was Originally Published In 1940 and Has Since Become A Collector's Item. The Poetry, Letters, and Artwork Contained In This Book Reveal The Adventurous Young Artist Who Loved The Arid Wilderness and Disappeared Into The Desert of Southern Utah. To The Original Book We Have Added Many Photographs of Ruess On The Trail, Along With Others Taken By Ruess of The Land That So Inspired Him. A Special Appenidx Tells The Salt Lake Tribune's Account of Its 1935 Expedition To Southern Utah In Search of Everett Ruess.
Biography & Autobiography

Finding Everett Ruess

Author: David Roberts

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 657

The definitive biography of Everett Ruess, the artist, writer, and eloquent celebrator of the wilderness whose bold solo explorations of the American West and mysterious disappearance in the Utah desert at age 20 have earned him a large and devoted cult following. Wandering alone with burros and pack horses through California and the Southwest for five years in the early 1930s, on voyages lasting as long as ten months, Ruess became friends with photographers Edward Weston and Dorothea Lange, swapped prints with Ansel Adams, took part in a Hopi ceremony, learned to speak Navajo, and was among the first "outsiders" to venture deeply into what was then (and to some extent still is) largely a little-known wilderness. When he vanished without a trace in November 1934, Ruess left behind thousands of pages of journals, letters, and poems, as well as more than a hundred watercolor paintings and blockprint engravings. Everett Ruess is hailed as a paragon of solo exploration, while the mystery of his death remains one of the greatest riddles in the annals of American adventure. David Roberts began probing the life and death of Everett Ruess for National Geographic Adventure magazine in 1998. Finding Everett Ruess is the result of his personal journeys into the remote areas explored by Ruess, his interviews with oldtimers who encountered the young vagabond and with Ruess’s closest living relatives, and his deep immersion in Ruess’s writings and artwork. More than 75 years after his vanishing, Ruess stirs the kinds of passion and speculation accorded such legendary doomed American adventurers as Into the Wild’s Chris McCandless and Amelia Earhart.
History

Pledge to the Wind, the Legend of Everett Ruess

Author: Robert Louis DeMayo

Publisher: Robert Louis DeMayo

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 286

View: 990

Eighty years ago a young man disappeared in the Utah wilderness. A large manhunt followed, but all they turned up was his last camp and a couple burros. Numerous historical books have been published that attempt to prove what happened to Everett, but his fate remains one of the biggest mysteries of the southwest. Pledge to the Wind, the Legend of Everett Ruess follows the adventures of Everett Ruess from his appearance in the southwest in 1931 when he was barely seventeen, until his disappearance in 1934, shortly before he turned 21. This historical fiction novel focuses more on how he lived from day to day, the adventures he experienced, and the language he used to express them. Upon reading it, Brian Ruess wrote, "In this work of fiction ... I saw Everett for the first time, as he might actually have been."
Biography & Autobiography

Sandstone Sunsets

Author: Mark A. Taylor

Publisher: Gibbs Smith Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 116

View: 517

Reuss vanished in S.E. Utah in 1934. Taylor sought clues, and he details his travels in this lonely, exquisite area.
Literary Collections

Pilgrims to the Wild

Author: John P. O'Grady

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 169

View: 205

Pilgrims to the Wild is a survey of American writers who have responded to their encounters with the natural world. Ranging in its treatment from Thoreau's important but neglected essay, 'Walking,' to the exuberant letters of the young artist Everett Ruess (who disappeared in the Escalante canyonlands), this is a broadly based exploration that brings to bear Eastern and Western classical philosophy, as well as contemporary critical theory, on a distinctive tradition of American Writing--those works concerned with the human relationship to the nonhuman world. In addition to offering a fresh interpretation of classic authors such a Thoreau and Muir, this book introduces readers to the less widely known but equally fascinating writers Clarence King and Mary Austin.
Fiction

To Die in Kanab

Author: Jack Nelson

Publisher: Cedar Fort

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 290

View: 671

Death. It haunts the red-rock canyons of Southern Utah, claiming the daring who forget what stalks them. Over seventy years ago, it claimed its most famous victim, the young Everett Ruess, poet, artist, and adventurer. Ever after, the curious have been seeking answers to the mystery of his fate. As the Sheriff of Kane County, it's Jared Buck's job to keep tourists alive and safe as they wander the rugged desert. When a group of Californians show up claiming they are going to make a blockbuster movie out of the affair - and solve the mystery at the same time - Sheriff Buck warns them that they are in over their heads. Determined to go through with their plans, they immediately anger the locals with their prying questions and arrogant assumptions. Then, when someone takes several shots at the group, Jared finds himself in an investigation that explodes into a full-blown crime scene when one member of the group ends up dead in the motel parking lot. Soon, it's Jared who's in over his head as he takes on the murder investigation, continues as Sheriff to deal with the rising problems in his district, and manage legal and political problems of his own. In the midst of all this, he finds himself being sucked into the mystery of the Everett Ruess affair as he uncovers answers that were hidden long ago. from the San Francisco Bay area to the wild tangle of cliffs and sky of southern Utah, Jared seeks the elusive facts of both deaths as well as answers to questions of his own. Will the land yield her secrets? Or are some things better left buried . . .? One thing is for certain: Jared never could have known where his search would lead him, or the choices he would have to make before the end.
Nature

Escalante

Author: Brooke Williams

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 77

View: 714

"But it is precisely this - nothing - that writer Brooke Williams and photographer Chris Noble find captivating about Escalante. In this thoughtful and exquisitely illustrated rumination, the authors tour the intricate network of chasms and gorges that began forming millions of years ago on the Colorado Plateau and today constitute a desert paradise of mesas, buttes, and boundless solitude. At the center of this landscape is the region known as Escalante, 1.7 million mostly roadless acres, where silence, darkness, and emptiness have no intrusions.".
Social Science

A Companion to Forensic Anthropology

Author: Dennis Dirkmaat

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 600

View: 658

A Companion to Forensic Anthropology presents the most comprehensive assessment of the philosophy, goals, and practice of forensic anthropology currently available, with chapters by renowned international scholars and experts. Highlights the latest advances in forensic anthropology research, as well as the most effective practices and techniques used by professional forensic anthropologists in the field Illustrates the development of skeletal biological profiles and offers important new evidence on statistical validation of these analytical methods. Evaluates the goals and methods of forensic archaeology, including the preservation of context at surface-scattered remains, buried bodies and fatal fire scenes, and recovery and identification issues related to large-scale mass disaster scenes and mass grave excavation.
Biography & Autobiography

Into the Wild

Author: Jon Krakauer

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 736

Jon Krakauer's Into the Wild examines true story of Chris McCandless, a young man, who in 1992 walked deep into the Alaskan wilderness and whose SOS note and emaciated corpse were found four months later, internationally bestselling author Jon Krakauer explores the obsession which leads some people to explore the outer limits of self, leave civilization behind and seek enlightenment through solitude and contact with nature. A 2007 film adaptation of Into the Wild was directed by Sean Penn and starred Emile Hirsch and Kristen Stewart.
Travel

Haunted Hikes

Author: Andrea Lankford

Publisher: Santa Monica Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 374

View: 985

Ghosts! Curses! Hoaxes! Unsolved mysteries! Paranormal events! Take a walk on the creepy side of North America's National Parks! Andrea Lankford, a 12-year veteran ranger with the National Park Service, has written a thoroughly investigated yet often tongue-in-cheek guidebook that takes the reader to the scariest, most mysterious places inside North America's National Parks. Lankford shares such eerie tales as John Brown's haunting of Harper's Ferry, the disembodied legs that have been seen running around inside the Mammoth Cave Visitor Center, and the "wailing woman" who roams the trail behind the Grand Canyon Lodge. Lankford also uncovers paranormal activities park visitors have experienced, such as the chupacabra that roams the swamps inside Big Thicket National Preserve and the teenage bigfoot who rolled a park service campground with toilet paper. She also reports on long-forgotten unsolved murders, such as the savage stabbing of a young woman on Yosemite's trail to Mirror Lake, and the execution style shooting of two General Motors executives at Crater Lake. The witnesses to the supernatural occurrences are highly credible people-rangers, park historians, river guides, and the like-and each tale has factual relevance to the cultural or natural history of the park. Haunted Hikes provides readers with all the information they need: for each hike: a "fright factor rating" is listed along with trailhead access information, detailed trail maps, and hike difficulty levels. Most of the haunted sites included in the book can be reached by the average hiker, some are wheelchair accessible, and others are for intrepid backpackers willing to make multi-day treks into wilderness areas. Intriguing photographs of many sites are included. Haunted Hikes is sure to satisfy readers looking for those spine-tingling moments when you begin to wonder if maybe, just maybe, we are not alone.
Religion

Backpacking with the Saints

Author: Belden C. Lane

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 968

Carrying only basic camping equipment and a collection of the world's great spiritual writings, Belden C. Lane embarks on solitary spiritual treks through the Ozarks and across the American Southwest. For companions, he has only such teachers as Rumi, John of the Cross, Hildegard of Bingen, Dag Hammarskjöld, and Thomas Merton, and as he walks, he engages their writings with the natural wonders he encounters--Bell Mountain Wilderness with Søren Kierkegaard, Moonshine Hollow with Thich Nhat Hanh--demonstrating how being alone in the wild opens a rare view onto one's interior landscape, and how the saints' writings reveal the divine in nature. The discipline of backpacking, Lane shows, is a metaphor for a spiritual journey. Just as the wilderness offered revelations to the early Desert Christians, backpacking hones crucial spiritual skills: paying attention, traveling light, practicing silence, and exercising wonder. Lane engages the practice not only with a wide range of spiritual writings--Celtic, Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, Hindu, and Sufi Muslim--but with the fascination of other lovers of the backcountry, from John Muir and Ed Abbey to Bill Plotkin and Cheryl Strayed. In this intimate and down-to-earth narrative, backpacking is shown to be a spiritual practice that allows the discovery of God amidst the beauty and unexpected terrors of nature. Adoration, Lane suggests, is the most appropriate human response to what we cannot explain, but have nonetheless learned to love. An enchanting narrative for Christians of all denominations, Backpacking with the Saints is an inspiring exploration of how solitude, simplicity, and mindfulness are illuminated and encouraged by the discipline of backcountry wandering, and of how the wilderness itself becomes a way of knowing-an ecology of the soul.
Fiction

Hard Twisted

Author: C. Joseph Greaves

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 931

Lucile Garrett is just thirteen when she meets Clint Palmer, a charismatic stranger who will forever change her life. The year is 1934, and as the windblown dust of the Great Depression rakes the Oklahoma plains, Palmer offers Lucile and her father, homeless and hungry, the irresistible promise of a better future. But when they follow Palmer to Texas, Lucile's father mysteriously disappears, launching man and girl on an epic journey through the American Southwest: a spree of violence and murder that culminates in one of the most celebrated criminal trials of the era. Based on a true story, Hard Twisted is a chilling tale of survival and redemption, and a young girl's coming of age in a world as cruel as it is beautiful.
Nature

The Redrock Chronicles

Author: Tom H. Watkins

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 163

View: 199

As a collection of geological and climatic phenomena, the earth is a scarred, bent, cracked, and agitated wreck of a place. Nowhere is this more evident than in Utah's redrock canyon country, which is among the most spectacular terrain not only in America but in the world. These extraordinary lands lie at the heart of the Colorado Plateau -- 130,000 square miles of uplifted rock sitting like a huge island in an earthly continental sea, surrounded on all sides by the remnants of once-active volcanoes. Although the Colorado Plateau includes portions of Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona, in no other part of any other state are its complexity and time-constructed beauty illuminated more brilliantly than in southern Utah. Tourists and outdoor enthusiasts by the millions visit and revisit the area because there is no place else on earth quite like it. In The Redrock Chronicles, T. H. Watkins, one of America's best-known and award-winning writers on the environment and history, focuses on southern Utah's unprotected lands in a loving testament to its warps and tangles of rock and sky. Combining history, geography, and photography, the author reports the full story of the region -- from its violent geologic beginnings to the coming (and going) of pre-Puebloan peoples whose drawings still adorn rocks and caves there, from the Mormon settlement of the 1840s and 1850s to the great uranium boom of the 1950s, from the beginning of tourism and parkland protection in the 1930s to today's controversial movement to preserve millions of acres of wild Utah land in the National Wilderness Preservation System. Indeed, the account of that revolutionary movement is told here in all its color and complexity for the first time. Writing from his own personal experience and extensive research, an appreciative Watkins takes readers on a tour of the Grand Staircase of plateaus, moving from the utterly wild triangle of Kaiparowits Plateau, with its erosion-sculptured mesas, tablelands, benchlands, and canyons, to a more welcoming kind of verdant wilderness that sits northeast, across the rolling desert scrubland of Harris Wash, in the red-walled canyon of the Escalante River. The author has spent much time hiking and camping here among the isolated buttes and mesas, and he draws a vivid portrait of the area's highlights: Comb Ridge, a 90-mile wall of 600-foot cliffs; Waterpocket Fold, an even more spectacular monocline to the northeast of the Escalante River, stretching a hundred miles; the Henry Mountains; Hump of Bull Mountain; Cataract Canyon; and the San Rafael Swell, an enormous oval some 2,200 square miles which rises just north of Capitol Reef National Park. But The Redrock Chronicles is not simply a celebration. Watkins concludes with a spirited call for the preservation of the unprotected wilderness that gives the land its character and color. He offers the legislative device of wilderness designation as the necessary means of saving this plateau country that is not marked by one or two or even three or four scenic marvels but by an enormous kaleidoscope of geological diversity whose impact on the senses can set the mind to reeling with every turn.
Political Science

River Republic

Author: Daniel McCool

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 818

Daniel McCool not only chronicles the history of water development agencies in America and the way in which special interests have abused rather than preserved the country's rivers, he also narrates the second, brighter act in this ongoing story: the surging, grassroots movement to bring these rivers back to life and ensure they remain pristine for future generations. The culmination of ten years of research and observation, McCool's book confirms the surprising news that America's rivers are indeed returning to a healthier, free-flowing condition. The politics of river restoration demonstrates how strong grassroots movements can challenge entrenched powers and win. Through passion and dedication, ordinary people are reclaiming the American landscape, forming a "river republic" of concerned citizens from all backgrounds and sectors of society. As McCool shows, the history, culture, and fate of America is tied to its rivers, and their restoration is a microcosm mirroring American beliefs, livelihoods, and an increasing awareness of what two hundred years of environmental degradation can do. McCool profiles the individuals he calls "instigators," who initiated the fight for these waterways and, despite enormous odds, have succeeded in the near-impossible task of challenging and changing the status quo. Part I of the volume recounts the history of America's relationship to its rivers; part II describes how and why Americans "parted" them out, destroying their essence and diminishing their value; and part III shows how society can live in harmony with its waterways while restoring their well-being—and, by extension, the well-being of those who depend on them.