Biography & Autobiography

Farewell To The East End

Author: Jennifer Worth

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 868

The third and final book in the bestselling CALL THE MIDWIFE series, the basis of the major BBC TV series. This final book in Jennifer Worth's memories of her time as a midwife in London's East end brings her story full circle. As always there are heartbreaking stories such as the family devastated by tuberculosis and a ship's woman who 'serviced' the entire crew, as well as plenty of humour and warmth, such as the tale of two women who shared the same husband! Other stories cover backstreet abortions, the changing life of the docklands, infanticide, as well as the lives of the inhabitants of Nonnatus House. We discover what happens with the gauche debutant Chummy and her equally gauche policeman; will Sister Monica Joan continue her life of crime? Will Sister Evangelina ever crack a smile? And what of Jennifer herself? The book not only details the final years of the tenements but also of Jennifer's journey as she moves on from the close community of nuns, and her life takes a new path.
Biography & Autobiography

Call the Midwife: Farewell to the East End

Author: Jennifer Worth

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 955

The last book in the trilogy begun by Jennifer Worth's New York Times bestseller and the basis for the PBS series Call the Midwife When twenty-two-year-old Jennifer Worth, from a comfortable middle-class upbringing, went to work as a midwife in the poorest section of postwar London, she not only delivered hundreds of babies and touched many lives, she also became the neighborhood's most vivid chronicler. Call the Midwife: Farewell to the East End is the last book in Worth's memoir trilogy, which the Times Literary Supplement described as "powerful stories with sweet charm and controlled outrage" in the face of dire circumstances. Here, at last, is the full story of Chummy's delightful courtship and wedding. We also meet Megan'mave, identical twins who share a browbeaten husband, and return to Sister Monica Joan, who is in top eccentric form. As in Worth's first two books, Call the Midwife: A Memoir of Birth, Joy, and Hard Times and Call the Midwife: Shadows of the Workhouse, the vividly portrayed denizens of a postwar East End contend with the trials of extreme poverty—unsanitary conditions, hunger, and disease—and find surprising ways to thrive in their tightly knit community. A rich portrait of a bygone era of comradeship and midwifery populated by unforgettable characters, Call the Midwife: Farewell to the East End will appeal to readers of Frank McCourt, Katherine Boo, and James Herriot, as well as to the fans of the acclaimed PBS show based on the trilogy.
Biography & Autobiography

An East End Farewell

Author: Yvette Venables

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 732

This is the memoir of an East End undertaker, Stan Cribb, who began his apprenticeship aged just fourteen, burying the victims of London's Blitz. During the last century, East End households had a special relationship with their local undertakers due to the large families and high mortality rates. Since he can remember, Stan Harris (more commonly known as Stan Cribb), spent his weekends captivated by the goings-on at his grandparents' funeral home. At fourteen, and much to the reluctance of his father, he dons his first suit and joins the family business as an apprentice to his quick-tempered uncle. Entering the profession at a time when an undertaker's role exposed them to the brutal realities of World War II, Stan spends his teenage years recovering dead bodies in the dark and standing guard over funeral carriages during air raids. After the war, with unfailing good humour, Stan takes us on a journey through his National Service, marriage, and unpredictable life as an East End undertaker.
Biography & Autobiography

Letters to the Midwife

Author: Jennifer Worth

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 146

Letters to the Midwife is a wonderful collection of correspondence received by Jennifer Worth, offering a fascinating glimpse into a long-lost world. Along with readers' responses and personal histories, it is filled with all sorts of heart-warming gems. There are stories from other midwives, lorry drivers, even a seamstress, all with tales to tell. Containing previously unpublished material describing her time spent in Paris and some journal entries, this is also a portrait of Jennifer herself, complete with a moving introduction by her family about the woman they knew and loved.
Literary Criticism

Poverty in Contemporary Literature

Author: B. Korte

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 149

View: 832

Poverty and inequality have gained a new public presence in the United Kingdom. Literature, and particularly narrative literature, (re-)configures how people think, feel and behave in relation to poverty. This makes the analysis of poverty-themed fiction an important aspect in the new transdisciplinary field of poverty studies.
History

A Farewell to Arms?

Author: Michael Cox

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 813

Neither naively optimistic nor hopelessley pessimistic, this collection of writings by experts on the history of the troubles in Northern Ireland paints a realistic picture of the peace processes that have dotted the province's landscape.
Biography & Autobiography

A Farewell to Glory

Author: Wally Carew

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 457

It began in November 1896 when football was still in its infancy. About 500 people turned out on a soggy field in Worcester, Massachusetts to watch Holy Cross battler Boston College. That game initiated one of the great rivalries in football history. Itinvolved some of the most famous players and coaches to ever step on a football field. In its 91 years, the rivalry spawned controversy, contention, fierce competitiveness, elation, gloom, and great moments. It was also linked to heart-breaking tragedy. In the end, the rivalry of the two Jesuit colleges, Boston college and Holy Cross, would prove to be a microcosm of intercollegiate sports.
Fiction

Farewell to Fairacre

Author: Miss Read

Publisher: HMH

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 260

View: 650

In this small English village, when one door closes, another opens for its favorite schoolteacher. “You’llrelish a visit to Fairacre” (Jan Karon, #1 New York Times–bestselling author). Gradually worsening health forces Miss Read to consider an early retirement from her job as the village school’s headmistress. John Jenkins, a handsome newcomer, competes for her affections with the newly widowed Henry Mawne. However, Miss Read has more on her mind than men. Orphans living in her former house have bolstered the village school’s roll, but these new students seem to be having problems with their adoptive family. In the midst of all this turmoil, readers can rest assured that Farewell to Fairacre boasts all the elements they have come to love: eccentric villagers, gentle humor, and a verdant rural landscape teeming with lambs, larks, and blackthorn bushes. “As soothing and warm as a cup of Earl Grey tea, this book will delight fans and newcomers to the series alike.” —Library Journal “Sensible, well read and acutely observant, the delightfully prim Miss Read continues to be very good company indeed.” —Publishers Weekly
Business & Economics

A Farewell to Alms

Author: Gregory Clark

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 432

View: 529

Why are some parts of the world so rich and others so poor? Why did the Industrial Revolution--and the unprecedented economic growth that came with it--occur in eighteenth-century England, and not at some other time, or in some other place? Why didn't industrialization make the whole world rich--and why did it make large parts of the world even poorer? In A Farewell to Alms, Gregory Clark tackles these profound questions and suggests a new and provocative way in which culture--not exploitation, geography, or resources--explains the wealth, and the poverty, of nations. Countering the prevailing theory that the Industrial Revolution was sparked by the sudden development of stable political, legal, and economic institutions in seventeenth-century Europe, Clark shows that such institutions existed long before industrialization. He argues instead that these institutions gradually led to deep cultural changes by encouraging people to abandon hunter-gatherer instincts-violence, impatience, and economy of effort-and adopt economic habits-hard work, rationality, and education. The problem, Clark says, is that only societies that have long histories of settlement and security seem to develop the cultural characteristics and effective workforces that enable economic growth. For the many societies that have not enjoyed long periods of stability, industrialization has not been a blessing. Clark also dissects the notion, championed by Jared Diamond in Guns, Germs, and Steel, that natural endowments such as geography account for differences in the wealth of nations. A brilliant and sobering challenge to the idea that poor societies can be economically developed through outside intervention, A Farewell to Alms may change the way global economic history is understood.
History

Cultural Encounters at Cape Farewell

Author: Einar Lund Jensen

Publisher: Museum Tusculanum Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 339

View: 938

This volume offers a comprehensive account of the cultural history of Greenland's Cape Farewell region in the 19th century. The dominating factor was the immigration of people to the area from southeast Greenland. There are no written sources originating from these immigrants, as they could neither read nor write, so the descriptions presented are primarily based on material from the Danish colonial authorities and the German Moravian mission. Although one-sided and reflecting a European view and conception of the world, the sources contain valuable information which, when pieced together, give a clear picture of immigration to the Cape Farewell area at the time, and of the society which arose in the wake of this immigration, not least of the impending struggle for the souls of the unbaptized East Greenlanders and also for their contribution to colonial trade in the 19th century. The volume includes accounts of the immigrants themselves which have been passed down from generation to ge