History

Father of the Tuskegee Airmen, John C. Robinson

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 432

Across black America during the Golden Age of Aviation, John C. Robinson was widely acclaimed as the long-awaited “black Lindbergh.” Robinson’s fame, which rivaled that of Joe Louis and Jesse Owens, came primarily from his wartime role as the commander of the Imperial Ethiopian Air Force after Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1935. As the only African American who served during the war’s entirety, the Mississippi-born Robinson garnered widespread recognition, sparking an interest in aviation for young black men and women. Known as the “Brown Condor of Ethiopia,” he provided a symbolic moral example to an entire generation of African Americans. While white America remained isolationist, Robinson fought on his own initiative against the march of fascism to protect Africa’s only independent black nation. Robinson’s wartime role in Ethiopia made him America’s foremost black aviator. Robinson made other important contributions that predated the Italo-Ethiopian War. After graduating from Tuskegee Institute, Robinson led the way in breaking racial barriers in Chicago, becoming the first black student and teacher at one of the most prestigious aeronautical schools in the United States, the Curtiss-Wright Aeronautical School. In May 1934, Robinson first planted the seed for the establishment of an aviation school at Tuskegee Institute. While Robinson’s involvement with Tuskegee was only a small part of his overall contribution to opening the door for blacks in aviation, the success of the Tuskegee Airmen—the first African American military aviators in the U.S. armed forces—is one of the most recognized achievements in twentieth-century African American history.
History

Pickett's Charge

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 909

Main Selection of the History Book Club The Battle of Gettysburg, the Civil War’s turning point, produced over 57,000 casualties, the largest number from the entire war that was itself America’s bloodiest conflict. On the third day of fierce fighting, Robert E. Lee’s attempt to invade the North came to a head in Pickett’s Charge. The infantry assault, consisting of nine brigades of soldiers in a line that stretched for over a mile, resulted in casualties of over 50 percent for the Confederates and a huge psychological blow to Southern morale. Pickett’s Charge is a detailed analysis of one of the most iconic and defining events in American history. This book presents a much-needed fresh look, including the unvarnished truths and ugly realities, about the unforgettable story. With the luxury of hindsight, historians have long denounced the folly of Lee’s attack, but this work reveals the tactical brilliance of a master plan that went awry. Special emphasis is placed on the common soldiers on both sides, especially the non-Virginia attackers outside of Pickett’s Virginia Division. These fighters’ moments of cowardice, failure, and triumph are explored using their own words from primary and unpublished sources. Without romance and glorification, the complexities and contradictions of the dramatic story of Pickett's Charge have been revealed in full to reveal this most pivotal moment in the nation’s life. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.
History

Soaring to Glory

Author: Philip Handleman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 391

"This book is a masterpiece. It captures the essence of the Tuskegee Airmen's experience from the perspective of one who lived it. The action sequences make me feel I'm back in the cockpit of my P-51C 'Kitten'! If you want to know what it was like fighting German interceptors in European skies while winning equal opportunity at home, be sure to read this book!" —Colonel Charles E. McGee, USAF (ret.) former president, Tuskegee Airmen Inc. “All Americans owe Harry Stewart Jr. and his fellow airmen a huge debt for defending our country during World War II. In addition, they have inspired generations of African American youth to follow their dreams.” —Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor, Harvard University He had to sit in a segregated rail car on the journey to Army basic training in Mississippi in 1943. But two years later, the twenty-year-old African American from New York was at the controls of a P-51, prowling for Luftwaffe aircraft at five thousand feet over the Austrian countryside. By the end of World War II, he had done something that nobody could take away from him: He had become an American hero. This is the remarkable true story of Lt. Col. Harry Stewart Jr., one of the last surviving Tuskegee Airmen pilots who experienced air combat during World War II. Award-winning aviation writer Philip Handleman recreates the harrowing action and heart-pounding drama of Stewart’s combat missions, including the legendary mission in which Stewart downed three enemy fighters. Soaring to Glory also reveals the cruel injustices Stewart and his fellow Tuskegee Airmen faced during their wartime service and upon return home after the war. Stewart’s heroism was not celebrated as it should have been in postwar America—but now, his boundless courage and determination will never be forgotten.
History

Tuskegee Airmen

Author: Barry M. Stentiford

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 520

• 16 original documents relating to the creation and performance of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, each accompanied by a brief description that provides historical context • 28 short biographies of black aviation and military pioneers, important people among the Tuskegee Airmen, as well as several of the Airmen themselves • A comprehensive bibliographic description of major secondary works on the Tuskegee Airmen, World War II, airpower, and black participation in the American military • A glossary of specialized terms pertaining to the military, aviation, World War II, and African Americans
History

Pickett's Charge

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 958

"The book is most interesting for the bright nuggets of information Tucker presents as he unfolds the attack minute by minute, foot by foot.… The account is a mosaic of thousands of tiny pieces that, seen whole, amounts to a fascinating picture of what probably was the most important moment of the Civil War.” —The New York Times Book Review "[Pickett's Charge] contains much to interest and provoke Civil War enthusiasts." —Kirkus Reviews "Takes issue with many long-held assumptions and analysis of the famous attack and seeks to revise many of the long-held misconceptions about Lee's plans, the course of the attack, and the ultimate reasons for its failure.... Overall, the author does a workmanlike job." —New York Journal of Books The Battle of Gettysburg, the Civil War’s turning point, produced over 57,000 casualties, the largest number from the entire war that was itself America’s bloodiest conflict. On the third day of fierce fighting, Robert E. Lee’s attempt to invade the North came to a head in Pickett’s Charge. The infantry assault, consisting of nine brigades of soldiers in a line that stretched for over a mile, resulted in casualties of over 50 percent for the Confederates and a huge psychological blow to Southern morale. Pickett’s Charge is a detailed analysis of one of the most iconic and defining events in American history. This book presents a much-needed fresh look, including the unvarnished truths and ugly realities, about the unforgettable story. With the luxury of hindsight, historians have long denounced the folly of Lee’s attack, but this work reveals the tactical brilliance of a master plan that went awry. Special emphasis is placed on the common soldiers on both sides, especially the non-Virginia attackers outside of Pickett’s Virginia Division. These fighters’ moments of cowardice, failure, and triumph are explored using their own words from primary and unpublished sources. Without romance and glorification, the complexities and contradictions of the dramatic story of Pickett's Charge have been revealed in full to reveal this most pivotal moment in the nation’s life.
History

Saving Washington's Army

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 99

Learn the little-known history of the forgotten American Revolution Battle of Pell's Point and the heroism of John Glover. General William Howe and the mighty British-Hessian Army possessed the golden opportunity to cut-off, trap, and then destroy General George Washington’s Army before he could retreat north and escape from Harlem Heights, New York, when he landed his army at Pell’s Point north of New York City. Howe’s bold amphibious operation north of Washington’s Army threatened to end the life of the Continental Army and the revolution. However, the brilliant delaying actions of Colonel John Glover and a small force of New England Continental troops saved the day and Washington’s Army by preventing Howe’s advance inland to intercept Washington’s route of retreat to White Plains. Employing brilliant delaying tactics when outnumbered by more than five to one, Glover inflicted heavy losses on the attackers to ensure that Washington’s Army survived to fight another day. Ironically, the Battle of Pell’s Point has been perhaps the most important forgotten battle of the entire American Revolution. In Saving Washington's Army, renowned historian Phillip Thomas Ticker, PhD, recounts the little-known story of the Battle of Pell's Point and the heroism of Colonel John Glover with the care and attention-to-detail for which he is known.
History

Death at the Little Bighorn

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 354

This book tells for the first time the forgotten story of the true turning point of America's most iconic battle: the story of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, Little Bighorn, the Sioux and Cheyenne tribes and their brave warriors, and the standoff that still resonates today. On the hot Sunday afternoon of June 25, 1876, Lieutenant Colonel Custer decided to go for broke. After dividing his famed 7th Cavalry, he ordered his senior officer, Major Marcus A. Reno, to strike the southern end of the vast Indian encampment along the Little Bighorn River, while Custer would launch a bold flank attack to hit the village's northern end. Custer needed to charge across the river at Medicine Tail Coulee Ford. We all know the ultimate outcome of this decision, but this groundbreaking new book proves that Custer's tactical plan was not so ill-conceived. The enemy had far superior numbers and more advanced weaponry. But Custer's plan could still have succeeded, as his tactics were fundamentally sound. Relying on Indian accounts that have been largely ignored by historians, this is also a story of the Sioux and Cheyenne warriors. Custer’s last move was repulsed, resulting in withdrawal to the high ground above the ford… and it was here, on the open and exposed slopes and hilltops, that Custer and his five companies were destroyed in systematic fashion.
History

African-Americans in Defense of the Nation

Author: James T. Controvich

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 430

View: 611

While the role of the African American in American history has been written about extensively, it is often difficult to locate the wealth of material that has been published. African-Americans in Defense of the Nation builds on a long list of early bibliographies concerning the subject, bringing together a broad spectrum of titles related to the African-American participation in America's wars. It covers both military exploits—as African Americans have been involved in every American conflict since the Revolution—and their participation in the homefront support.
Juvenile Nonfiction

Little Leaders: Exceptional Men in Black History

Author: Vashti Harrison

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 96

View: 203

This beautifully illustrated volume educates and inspires as it relates true stories of black men in history. Illuminating text paired with irresistible full-color art bring to life both iconic and lesser-known figures. Among these biographies, readers will find aviators and artists, politicians and pop culture icons. The men featured include writer James Baldwin, artist Aaron Douglas, photographer Gordon Parks, diplomat Kofi Annan, comic book author Dwayne McDuffie, and musician Prince.
History

The Story of Black Military Officers, 1861-1948

Author: Krewasky A. Salter I

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 692

Black members of the military served in every war, conflict and military engagement between 1861 and 1948. Beyond serving only as enlisted soldiers and non-commissioned officers, many also served as commissioned officers in positions of leadership and authority. This book offers the first complete and conclusive work to specifically examine the history of black commissioned officers.
Blacks

Straightening the Bell Curve

Author: Constance B. Hilliard

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Blacks

Page: 151

View: 461

Finally, an answer to The Bell Curve...
History

Alexander Hamilton and the Battle of Yorktown, October 1781

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 936

Discover the little-known role Alexander Hamilton played in the decisive battle of the American Revolution: Yorktown. Alexander Hamilton and the Battle of Yorktown, October 1781 is the first book in nearly two and a half centuries that has ever been devoted to the story of Alexander Hamilton’s key contributions in winning the most decisive victory the of the American Revolutionary war at Yorktown. Past biographies of Hamilton, including the most respected ones, have minimized the overall importance of the young lieutenant colonel’s role and battlefield performance at Yorktown, which was key to forcing the surrender of Lord Cornwallis’s army. Hamilton led the assault on strategic Redoubt Number Ten, located on the left flank of the British defensive line, and captured the defensive bastion—an accomplishment that ensured the defeat and surrender of Cornwallis’s army that won the American Revolution and changed the course of world history. You thought you knew the full story of the founding father of the American financial system from Lin Manual Miranda's Broadway smash hit Hamilton, but Alexander Hamilton and the Battle of Yorktown, October 1781 brings into sharp relief the vital role he played in the most important battle of the American Revolution, as told by renowned historian Phillip Thomas Ticker, PhD.
Juvenile Nonfiction

African American Explorers & Adventurers

Author: Joanne Randolph

Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 595

From the top of Everest to the deepest recesses of previously unexplored caves, from the heart of the sea to the far reaches of space, African American explorers and adventurers have helped chart the unknown, push the boundaries of the frontier, scale the heights, and shoot for the stars. With profiles of courageous and pioneering figures like Arctic explorer Matthew Alexander Henson, the Lewis and Clark corpsman York, and pilot Bessie Coleman, this inspiring collection celebrates the often unsung accomplishments of African American whalers, gold rush fortune-seekers, explorers, mountaineers, pilots, and other intrepid adventurers. They overcame injustice, prejudice, and inequality to triumph in expanding our knowledge of the world and our notions of what was possible within it.
History

Kings Mountain

Author: Phillip Thomas Tucker

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 407

Learn the little-known history of the turning-point battle of Kings Mountain, one of the most decisive American victories in the Revolutionary War. The Battle of Kings Mountain was the most remarkable, unexpected, and unorthodox patriot victory of supreme importance that was fought during the course of the American Revolution. The victors of Kings Mountain were South Carolina, Virginia, and North Carolina Backcountry volunteers (including men from today’s Tennessee) of a ghost army that suddenly materialized practically out of thin air from both sides of the Appalachian Mountains on its own and without authorization from the Continental Congress or Continental officers. To defend their farms and families and the land they loved, on October 7, 1780, this ad hoc force of Backcountry volunteers from remote settlements across the frontier suddenly descended upon a well-trained and well-equipped force of more than one thousand Royal Provincial and Loyalist troops, who defiantly made their last stand on the summit of Kings Mountain, after having been caught by surprise. During one of the hardest fought and bloodiest battles of the American Revolution, this one-sided (the entire enemy force—the vital left wing of Lord Charles Cornwallis’ Army—was killed, wounded, and captured) patriot victory at Kings Mountain was a major turning point of not only the war in the South, but also of the American Revolution. Ironically, no battle of the American Revolution more forcefully demonstrated the lethal effectiveness of Southern militia and the future surreal horrors of America’s first civil war. This decisive battle in northwest South Carolina was fought between fellow Americans, including not only neighbors but also relatives, even fathers and sons, nearly three-quarters of a century before the Battles of First Manassas, Antietam, and Gettysburg, when young Americans once again slaughtered each other for what they believed was right. When it appeared at the time that the war in South Carolina had been lost to the British, the patriots of Kings Mountain rose splendidly to the challenge to win an amazing success that best personified the essence and spirit of the revolution, which the victors kept alive during one of the darkest periods of the American Revolution. Most importantly, the dramatic patriot victory at Kings Mountain on October 7, 1781 helped to set the stage and pave the way for the surrender of Cornwallis’ Army at Yorktown only a year later, which was an event that all but ended the war and ensured the independence of a new nation.
History

All the Countries the Americans Have Ever Invaded

Author: Christopher Kelly

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 655

The controversial story of American invasions throughout history – how the world’s superpower came to be what it is today.
Business & Economics

Encyclopedia of African American Business History

Author: Juliet E. K. Walker

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 721

View: 382

Analyzes the African American business experience from the 1600s to the present through three main types of entries: biographies, topics in black business history, and black participation in selected industries. Includes a chronology of Black business history from 1619-1999.
Academic libraries

Choice

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Academic libraries

Page:

View: 440

African American air pilots

Tuskegee's Heroes

Author: Charlie Cooper Ann Cooper

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African American air pilots

Page: 156

View: 160

History

Africana: Aardvark-Catholic

Author: Anthony Appiah

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 4096

View: 752

In this newly expanded edition, more than 4,000 articles cover prominent African and African American individuals, events, trends, places, political movements, art forms, businesses, religions, ethnic groups, organizations, countries, and more.
History

Invisible Wings

Author:

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 718

Invisible Wings is the only reference book on Blacks in aviation. More than 1,600 entries give the bibliography the scope and length that will enable scholars, researchers, and students to delve into this little studied aspect of the Black experience. This annotated bibliography includes citations on pilots, flight attendants, air traffic controllers, mechanics, doctors, engineers, scientists, astronauts, and others whose achievements in aeronautics, commerical and military, are unrecognized. The first four chapters highlight the major figures, and the next five chapters annotate books and articles on airlines, Chicago, discrimination, history, and women. The work covers three quarters of the twentieth century from 1916 to 1993, with one of the earliest articles describing the world's first Black pilot, Eugene J. Bullard, and one of the most recent covering the first African American in space, Guion S. Bluford.