Political Science

Feminism and Emotion

Author: S. Mendus

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 197

View: 260

Susan Mendus investigates the significance of love in moral and political philosophy. She argues for a re-interpretation of both enlightenment and feminist thinking, and shows how the former often takes love as central, while the latter draws our attention to human vulnerability and neediness. By combining the insights of enlightenment philosophy and feminist theory, the book aims to provide a new understanding of the role of love in moral and political philosophy.
Political Science

Rational Woman

Author: Raia Prokhovnik

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 859

To feminists and some postmodernists reason/emotion and man/woman represent two fundamental polarities, fixed deep within Western philosophy and reflected in the structures of our languages, and two sets of hierarchical power relations in patriarchal society. Raia Prokhovnik challenges the tradition of dualism and argues that rational woman need no longer be a contradiction in terms. Prokhovnik examines in turn: · the nature of dichotomy, its problems and an alternative · the reason/emotion dichotomy · dichotomies central to the man/woman dualism, such as sex/gender and the heterosexual/ist norm
Philosophy

Cultural Politics of Emotion

Author: Sara Ahmed

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 771

A bold exploration of the relationship between emotions and politics, through case studies on international terrorism, asylum, migration, reconciliation and reparation. Develops a theory of how emotions work and their effects on our daily lives.
Education

Feeling Power

Author: Megan Boler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 268

View: 262

First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Social Science

The Feminist Fourth Wave

Author: Prudence Chamberlain

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 203

View: 843

This book examines the fourth wave of feminism within the United Kingdom. Focusing on examples of contemporary activism it considers the importance of understanding affect and temporality in relation to surges of feminist activity. Examining the wave’s historical use in the feminist movement, the book redefines the symbol in an attempt to overcome difficulties of generations, identities and divisions. The author contends that feminism must develop its own methods for time keeping, in which past activism and future aspirations touch on the present moment. Through this unique temporality, she continues, feminism can make space for affective ties to create intense moments of activism, in which surges of feeling catalyse and sustain mass action. This thought-provoking book, with its exploration of the relationship between feeling, the personal and political, will appeal to students and academics working in the fields of gender studies, feminism and affect studies.
Philosophy

The Virtue of Feminist Rationality

Author: Deborah K. Heikes

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 334

Feminist philosophers have been some of the most vocal critics of reason and rationality. While most feminists realize that rationality is a concept that cannot be entirely abandoned, few have considered how to construct a positive account of rationality. This book represents a sustained argument for a feminist theory of rationality. It opens by asking the question: is reason inherently masculine? Deborah K. Heikes goes on to answer this question negatively and to examine what feminists actually want from a theory of rationality, specifying what a virtue theory of rationality is and how it works. She identifies those features that feminists believe are central to reason, identifying four dichotomies that are central to feminist thinking (mind/body, reason/emotion, identity/difference, objectivity/subjectivity), and argues that they can be captured by conceiving of rationality as a virtue concept. She further demonstrates how a specifically feminist theory of rationality can provide objective grounds for feminists' moral, political and epistemic agendas.
Social Science

Performance, Feminism and Affect in Neoliberal Times

Author: Elin Diamond

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 997

This book is a provocative new study of global feminist activism that opposes neoliberal regimes across several sites including Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, Latin America and the United States. The feminist performative acts featured in the book contest the aggressive unravelling of collectively won gains in gender, sexual and racial equality, the appearance of new planes of discrimination, and the social consequences of political economies based on free market ideology. The investigations of affect theory follow the circulation of intensities – of political impingements on bodies, subjective and symbolic violence, and the shock of dispossession – within and beyond individuals to the social and political sphere. Affect is a helpful matrix for discussing the volatile interactivity between performer and spectator, whether live or technologically mediated. Contending that there is no activism without affect, the collection brings back to the table the activist and hopeful potential of feminism.
Social Science

Emotion and the Researcher

Author:

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 177

Contributors to this edited collection argue for an emotional rebellion in the academic world, arguing that the presentation of research as ‘objective’ conceals the subject positions of researchers and the emotional imperatives that often drive research.
Performing Arts

Media Audiences: Television, Meaning and Emotion

Author: Kristyn Gorton

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

View: 845

An engaging and original study of current research on television audiences and the concept of emotion, this book offers a unique approach to key issues within television studies. Topics discussed include: television branding; emotional qualities in television texts; audience reception models; fan cultures; 'quality' television; television aesthetics; reality television; individualism and its links to television consumption.The book is divided into two sections: the first covers theoretical work on the audience, fan cultures, global television, theorising emotion and affect in feminist theory and film and television studies. The second half offers a series of case studies on television programmes such as Wife Swap, The Sopranos and Six Feet Under in order to explore how emotion is fashioned, constructed and valued in televisual texts. The final chapter features original material from interviews with industry professionals in the UK and Irish soap industries along with advice for students on how to conduct their own small-scale ethnographic projects.
Literary Criticism

Statistical Panic

Author: Kathleen Woodward

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 330

View: 798

In this moving and thoughtful book, Kathleen Woodward explores the politics and poetics of the emotions, focusing on American culture since the 1960s. She argues that we are constrained in terms of gender, race, and age by our culture’s scripts for “emotional” behavior and that the accelerating impoverishment of interiority is a symptom of our increasingly media-saturated culture. She also shows how we can be empowered by stories that express our experience, revealing the value of our emotions as a crucial form of intelligence. Referring discreetly to her own experience, Woodward examines the interpenetration of social structures and subjectivity, considering how psychological emotions are social phenomena, with feminist anger, racial shame, old-age depression, and sympathy for non-human cyborgs (including robots) as key cases in point. She discusses how emerging institutional and discursive structures engender “new” affects that in turn can help us understand our changing world if we are attentive to them—the “statistical panic” produced by the risk society, with its numerical portents of disease and mortality; the rage prompted by impenetrable and bloated bureaucracies; the brutal shame experienced by those caught in the crossfire of the media; and the conservative compassion that is not an emotion at all, only an empty political slogan. The orbit of Statistical Panic is wide, drawing in feminist theory, critical phenomenology, and recent theories of the emotions. But at its heart are stories. As an antidote to the vacuous dramas of media culture, with its mock emotions and scattershot sensations, Woodward turns to the autobiographical narrative. Stories of illness—by Joan Didion, Yvonne Rainer, Paul Monette, and Alice Wexler, among others—receive special attention, with the inexhaustible emotion of grief framing the book as a whole.
Social Science

Becoming Feminist

Author: Carly Guest

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 898

This book offers a novel, detailed and sensitive exploration of women's engagement with feminism. Centred on the themes of generations, hope, emotions and belonging, each chapter attends to the specific and particular practices of 'becoming feminist' via a series of accessible case studies. Adopting a theoretical and methodological focus on narrative and memory, this original and absorbing work analyses the various and complex ways in which feminism and its histories are received and processed by some feminist women today. Its focus on the specificity of experience disrupts overarching narratives of feminism and its histories, whilst acknowledging that such narratives are often used to sustain, defend and maintain a secure feminist identity. In doing so, it develops a growing body of work concerned with the relationships women forge to feminism’s pasts, presents and futures, with a distinct focus on the stories feminist women tell about their lives. It will appeal to students and scholars of sociology, psychosocial studies, gender studies, women's studies and cultural studies.
Social Science

Boys Don't Cry?

Author: Milette Shamir

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 166

We take for granted the idea that white, middle-class, straight masculinity connotes total control of emotions, emotional inexpressivity, and emotional isolation. That men repress their feelings as they seek their fortunes in the competitive worlds of business and politics seems to be a given. This collection of essays by prominent literary and cultural critics rethinks such commonly held views by addressing the history and politics of emotion in prevailing narratives about masculinity. How did the story of the emotionally stifled U.S. male come into being? What are its political stakes? Will the "release" of straight, white, middle-class masculine emotion remake existing forms of power or reinforce them? This collection forcefully challenges our most entrenched ideas about male emotion. Through readings of works by Thoreau, Lowell, and W. E. B. Du Bois, and of twentieth century authors such as Hemingway and Kerouac, this book questions the persistence of the emotionally alienated male in narratives of white middle-class masculinity and addresses the political and social implications of male emotional release.
Social Science

Engendering Emotions

Author: A. Petersen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 185

View: 521

Engendering Emotions examines the production and promotion of the idea of sex/gender difference in emotional experience and expression in the contemporary West. Focusing on the psychology of emotions and on the spheres of aggression and war, and love, intimacy and sex, it explores how the idea of emotional difference serves to define and govern relations between men and women. The book draws on diverse theoretical work and recent empirical data to chart new territory in the study of sex/gender differences.
Political Science

Politics and the Emotions

Author: Paul Hoggett

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 230

Politics and the Emotions is a unique collection of essays that reflects the affective turn in the analysis of today's political world. Contributed by both prominent and younger scholars from Europe, US, and Australia, the book aims to advance the debate on the relation between politics and the emotions. To do so, essays are organized around five key thematic areas: emotion, antagonism and deliberation, the politics of fear, the affective dimension of political mobilization, the politics of reparation, and politics and the triumph of the therapeutic. In addition, each chapter includes a case study to demonstrate the application of concepts to practical issues, from the war on terror in the UK and the AIDS activist organization ACT UP in the US to women's liberation movement in New Zealand and Dutch policy experiments. Politics and the Emotions provides an accessible introduction to a rapidly developing field that will appeal to students in political theory, public and social policy, as well as the theory and practice of democracy.
Psychology

Psychosomatic

Author: Elizabeth A. Wilson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 136

View: 948

How can scientific theories contribute to contemporary accounts of embodiment in the humanities and social sciences? In particular, how does neuroscientific research facilitate new approaches to theories of mind and body? Feminists have frequently criticized the neurosciences for biological reductionism, yet, Elizabeth A. Wilson argues, neurological theories—especially certain accounts of depression, sexuality, and emotion—are useful to feminist theories of the body. Rather than pointing toward the conventionalizing tendencies of the neurosciences, Wilson emphasizes their capacity for reinvention and transformation. Focusing on the details of neuronal connections, subcortical pathways, and reflex actions, she suggests that the central and peripheral nervous systems are powerfully allied with sexuality, the affects, emotional states, cognitive appetites, and other organs and bodies in ways not fully appreciated in the feminist literature. Whether reflecting on Simon LeVay’s hypothesis about the brains of gay men, Peter Kramer’s model of depression, or Charles Darwin’s account of trembling and blushing, Wilson is able to show how the neurosciences can be used to reinvigorate feminist theories of the body.
Social Science

Reconsidering Radical Feminism

Author: Jessica Joy Cameron

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 210

What’s the right way to be a feminist? Reconsidering Radical Feminism is not only a clear, precise summary of late-twentieth-century feminist debates about the politics of heterosexuality. It’s also an examination of how we become invested in arguments that position us as particular kinds of feminists – and as gendered subjects. Through the lens of poststructuralism, queer theory, and affect theory, Jessica Joy Cameron investigates the legacy of the passionate dispute between radical feminism and sex-positive feminism. In doing so, she reveals the timeliness of her subject as contemporary policies about sexual assault, consent, and safe spaces come under scrutiny.
Philosophy

Retrieving Political Emotion

Author: Barbara Koziak

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 291

Then, drawing especially on Aristotle's construal of it as a general capacity for emotion and relating this to contemporary multidisciplinary work on emotion, she reformulates thumos to provide a more adequate theory of political emotion, as an antidote to the modern fixation on rational self-interest as the key to explaining political behavior."--BOOK JACKET.
Psychology

The Power of Feelings

Author: Nancy Chodorow

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 328

View: 667

Drawing upon her broad knowledge and background in social theory, Chodorow argues that psychoanalysis gives an account of subjectivity that incorporates forms of wholeness and depth of experience, without which we cannot have a meaningful life.