Science

Food and the City in Europe since 1800

Author: Peter Lummel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 627

This fascinating volume examines the impact that rapid urbanization has had upon diets and food systems throughout Western Europe over the past two centuries. Bringing together studies from across the continent, it stresses the fundamental links between key changes in European social history and food systems, food cultures and food politics. Contributors respond to a number of important questions, including: when and how did local food production cease to be sufficient for the city and when did improved transport conditions and liberal commercial relations replace local by supra-regional food supplies? How far did the food industry contribute to improved living conditions in cities? What influence did urban consumers have? Food and the City in Europe since 1800 also examines issues of food hygiene and health impacts in cities, looks at various food innovations and how ’new’ foods often first gained acceptance in cities, and explores how eating fashions have changed over the centuries.
Science

Food and the City in Europe since 1800

Author: Peter Lummel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 479

This fascinating volume examines the impact that rapid urbanization has had upon diets and food systems throughout Western Europe over the past two centuries. Bringing together studies from across the continent, it stresses the fundamental links between key changes in European social history and food systems, food cultures and food politics. Contributors respond to a number of important questions, including: when and how did local food production cease to be sufficient for the city and when did improved transport conditions and liberal commercial relations replace local by supra-regional food supplies? How far did the food industry contribute to improved living conditions in cities? What influence did urban consumers have? Food and the City in Europe since 1800 also examines issues of food hygiene and health impacts in cities, looks at various food innovations and how ’new’ foods often first gained acceptance in cities, and explores how eating fashions have changed over the centuries.
Social Science

The Handbook of Food Research

Author: Anne Murcott

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 680

View: 721

The last 20 years have seen a burgeoning of social scientific and historical research on food. The field has drawn in experts to investigate topics such as: the way globalisation affects the food supply; what cookery books can (and cannot) tell us; changing understandings of famine; the social meanings of meals - and many more. Now sufficiently extensive to require a critical overview, this is the first handbook of specially commissioned essays to provide a tour d'horizon of this broad range of topics and disciplines. The editors have enlisted eminent researchers across the social sciences to illustrate the debates, concepts and analytic approaches of this widely diverse and dynamic field. This volume will be essential reading, a ready-to-hand reference book surveying the state of the art for anyone involved in, and actively concerned about research on the social, political, economic, psychological, geographic and historical aspects of food. It will cater for all who need to be informed of research that has been done and that is being done.
Social Science

Food and War in Twentieth Century Europe

Author: Dr Ina Zweiniger-Bargielowska

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 294

View: 974

Wars cannot be fought and sustained without food and this unique collection explores the impact of war on food production, allocation and consumption in Europe in the twentieth century. A comparative perspective which incorporates belligerent, occupied and neutral countries provides new insights into the relationship between food and war. The analysis ranges from military provisioning and systems of food rationing to civilians' survival strategies and the role of war in stimulating innovation and modernization.
Science

Pure Adulteration

Author: Benjamin R. Cohen

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 331

View: 233

In the latter nineteenth century, extraordinary changes in food and agriculture gave rise to new tensions in the ways people understood, obtained, trusted, and ate their food. This was the Era of Adulteration, and its concerns have carried forward to today: How could you tell the food you bought was the food you thought you bought? Could something manufactured still be pure? Is it okay to manipulate nature far enough to produce new foods but not so far that you question its safety and health? How do you know where the line is? And who decides? In Pure Adulteration, Benjamin R. Cohen uses the pure food crusades to provide a captivating window onto the origins of manufactured foods and the perceived problems they wrought. Cohen follows farmers, manufacturers, grocers, hucksters, housewives, politicians, and scientific analysts as they struggled to demarcate and patrol the ever-contingent, always contested border between purity and adulteration, and as, at the end of the nineteenth century, the very notion of a pure food changed. In the end, there is (and was) no natural, prehuman distinction between pure and adulterated to uncover and enforce; we have to decide. Today’s world is different from that of our nineteenth-century forebears in many ways, but the challenge of policing the difference between acceptable and unacceptable practices remains central to daily decisions about the foods we eat, how we produce them, and what choices we make when buying them.
Architecture

The Routledge Handbook of Sustainable Cities and Landscapes in the Pacific Rim

Author: Yizhao Yang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 942

View: 131

This handbook addresses a growing list of challenges faced by regions and cities in the Pacific Rim, drawing connections around the what, why, and how questions that are fundamental to sustainable development policies and planning practices. These include the connection between cities and surrounding landscapes, across different boundaries and scales; the persistence of environmental and development inequities; and the growing impacts of global climate change, including how physical conditions and social implications are being anticipated and addressed. Building upon localized knowledge and contextualized experiences, this edited collection brings attention to place-based approaches across the Pacific Rim and makes an important contribution to the scholarly and practical understanding of sustainable urban development models that have mostly emerged out of the Western experiences. Nine sections, each grounded in research, dialogue, and collaboration with practical examples and analysis, focus on a theme or dimension that carries critical impacts on a holistic vision of city-landscape development, such as resilient communities, ecosystem services and biodiversity, energy, water, health, and planning and engagement. This international edited collection will appeal to academics and students engaged in research involving landscape architecture, architecture, planning, public policy, law, urban studies, geography, environmental science, and area studies. It also informs policy makers, professionals, and advocates of actionable knowledge and adoptable ideas by connecting those issues with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations. The collection of writings presented in this book speaks to multiyear collaboration of scholars through the APRU Sustainable Cities and Landscapes (SCL) Program and its global network, facilitated by SCL Annual Conferences and involving more than 100 contributors from more than 30 institutions. The Open Access version of chapters 1, 2, 4, 11, 17, 23, 30, 37, 42, 49, and 56 of this book, available at http://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781003033530, have been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license.
Social Science

Meat Makes People Powerful

Author: Wilson J. Warren

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 708

From large-scale cattle farming to water pollution, meat— more than any other food—has had an enormous impact on our environment. Historically, Americans have been among the most avid meat-eaters in the world, but long before that meat was not even considered a key ingredient in most civilizations’ diets. Labor historian Wilson Warren, who has studied the meat industry for more than a decade, provides this global history of meat to help us understand how it entered the daily diet, and at what costs and benefits to society. Spanning from the nineteenth century to current and future trends, Warren walks us through the economic theory of food, the discovery of protein, the Japanese eugenics debate around meat, and the environmental impact of livestock, among other topics. Through his comprehensive, multifaceted research, he provides readers with the political, economic, social, and cultural factors behind meat consumption over the last two centuries. With a special focus on East Asia, Meat Makes People Powerful reveals how national governments regulated and oversaw meat production, helping transform virtually vegetarian cultures into major meat consumers at record speed. As more and more Americans pay attention to the sources of the meat they consume, Warren’s compelling study will help them not only better understand the industry, but also make more informed personal choices. Providing an international perspective that will appeal to scholars and nutritionists alike, this timely examination will forever change the way you see the food on your plate.
History

Feeding Gotham

Author: Gergely Baics

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 778

New York City witnessed unparalleled growth in the first half of the nineteenth century, its population rising from thirty thousand people to nearly a million in a matter of decades. Feeding Gotham looks at how America's first metropolis grappled with the challenge of provisioning its inhabitants. It tells the story of how access to food, once a public good, became a private matter left to free and unregulated markets—and of the profound consequences this had for American living standards and urban development. Taking readers from the early republic to the Civil War, Gergely Baics explores the changing dynamics of urban governance, market forces, and the built environment that defined New Yorkers’ experiences of supplying their households. He paints a vibrant portrait of the public debates that propelled New York from a tightly regulated public market to a free-market system of provisioning, and shows how deregulation had its social costs and benefits. Baics uses cutting-edge GIS mapping techniques to reconstruct New York’s changing food landscapes over half a century, following residents into neighborhood public markets, meat shops, and groceries across the city’s expanding territory. He lays bare how unequal access to adequate and healthy food supplies led to an increasingly differentiated urban environment. A masterful blend of economic, social, and geographic history, Feeding Gotham traces how this highly fragmented geography of food access became a defining and enduring feature of the American city.
Social Science

Food Values in Europe

Author: Valeria Siniscalchi

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 305

What can a focus on “food projects” in Europe tell us about contemporary social processes and cultural debates? Valeria Siniscalchi and Krista Harper show how food becomes a marker of identity and resistance to social exclusion, and how food values become tools for transforming power dynamics at the local level and beyond. Through the comparison of food-centered movements across Europe, the book explains how these forms of mobilization express ideologies as well as economic and political objectives. The chapters use an ethnographic approach to focus on the transformation of values carried by individuals and groups in relation to food in Portugal, Greece, Latvia, Moldova, Denmark, the UK, Italy, and France. Contributors analyze food values, as expressed in daily life and livelihoods, through specific practices of production, exchange, and consumption. Topics covered include Prague's urban agricultural scene, the perception of poverty in Moldova, shepherds' protests in Sardinia, and organic food cooperatives in Catalonia.