Religion

Foundations of Internal Alchemy

Author: Mu Wang

Publisher: Golden Elixir Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 156

View: 311

Originally written for Chinese readers, this book provides a clear description of the Taoist practice of Internal Alchemy, or Neidan. The author outlines the four stages of the alchemical practice and clarifies several relevant terms and notions, including Essence, Breath, and Spirit; the Cinnabar Fields; the "Fire Times"; and the Embryo. The book is based on the system of the "Wuzhen pian" (Awakening to Reality), one of the main sources of Internal Alchemy, and contains about two hundred quotations from original Taoist texts. Table of Contents Foreword, vii INTRODUCTION, 1 The Basis: Essence and Spirit, 3 STAGES OF THE ALCHEMICAL PRACTICE IN "AWAKENING TO REALITY," 11 The Four Stages, 13 "Laying the Foundations," 15 Main Points in the Practice of "Laying the Foundations," 20 The Functions of Essence, Breath, and Spirit, 36 Terms Related to the "Coagulation of the Three Treasures," 52 Conclusion of the Stage of "Laying the Foundations," 63 "Refining Essence to Transmute it into Breath," 65 "Refining Breath to Transmute it into Spirit," 99 "Refining Spirit to Return to Emptiness," 109 CONCLUSION, 119 The "Arts of the Way," 121 Tables, 123 Glossary of Chinese Characters, 133

Secrets of Drunken Boxing 3: Internal Alchemy

Author: Neil Ripski

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 178

View: 330

Secrets of Drunken Boxing Volume Three: Internal Alchemy Chinese martial arts have always been filled with secrets. Secret forms, secret weapons, and most importantly secret training methods and potions (Dit Da Jow). This volume focuses on the secret training methods for cultivating qi, hard skills like Iron Body and Iron Broom, soft skills like Drunken Cotton Belly and Heavy Hands aka Cotton Palm, and internal work (Nei Gong) involving meditation and cultivating Dantian as a source for internal power. The Ma Family where this Northern Drunken style originates also has its own secret qigong practices which are included in this text as well. The methods within are the power source for a Drunken Boxers gongfu skills. Once the shape is built, the power must be cultivated to flow through the shape of the art ? this is the text outlining how.

Return to Oneness with the Tao

Author: Ricardo B. Serrano

Publisher: Ricardo B Serrano

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 106

View: 946

Commentaries, Meditation and Qigong for Healing and Spiritual Awakening"The teaching focuses essentially on the purification of Jing-Chi-Shen into its final product: the elixir of pure-person." - Door to All Wonders, Tao Te ChingThe second book Return to Oneness with the Tao elaborates on the Taoist meditation and Qigong inner alchemy techniques such as lower dantien breathing, Microcosmic Orbit Qigong, primordial wuji Qigong, meditation on twin hearts, and Tibetan Shamanic Qigong to cultivate the Three Treasures Jing, Qi and Shen. An important addition to this book is the understanding of a most important principle - awareness and intention are powerful factors for personal transformation and healing. When we are aware of what is - the emotional root cause of disease that is blocking the flow of Qi - we can intentionally release it through meditation and Qigong to effect a process of change for personal transformation and healing."Oneness or Qigong state (samadhi) is experienced by cultivating the Three Treasures Jing, Qi and Shen in the Three Dantians through the practice of Qigong." - Master Ricardo B Serrano
Religion

Commentary on the Mirror for Compounding the Medicine

Author: 王玠

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 104

View: 152

The "Ruyao jing" (Mirror for Compounding the Medicine) is one of the most famous texts of Taoist Internal Alchemy, or Neidan. Written in the 10th century and attributed to Cui Xifan, it describes the foundations of Internal Alchemy in 20 short poems of four verses. Because of its symbolic and cryptic language, it has been subjected to different and sometimes conflicting interpretations. This book contains the first complete translation of the "Ruyao jing" and of the commentary by Wang Jie, who lived in the 14th century. Wang Jie - also known as Wang Daoyuan and as Hunran zi (Master of the Inchoate) - was a second-generation disciple of the great Neidan master, Li Daochun. His commentary is characterized by a strong connection between the doctrinal and the practical aspects of Neidan. The translator's notes provide details on the main technical terms and on the relation of this work to other important texts of Internal Alchemy, in particular the "Cantong qi" (Seal of the Unity of the Three) and the "Wuzhen pian" (Awakening to Reality). The book is vol. 1 in the "Masters" series of Golden Elixir Press. Contents Introduction, p. vii Translation, p. 1 Five Poems by Wang Jie, p. 65 Chinese Text, p. 69 Glossary of Chinese Characters, p. 83 Works Quoted, p. 89
Religion

Taoism

Author: Eva Wong

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 647

For the first time, the great depth and diversity of Taoist spirituality is introduced in a single, accessible manual. Taoism, known widely today through the teachings of the classic Tao Te Ching and the practices of t'ai chi and feng-shui, is less known for its unique traditions of meditation, physical training, magical practice and internal alchemy. Covering all of the most important texts, figures, and events, this essential guide illuminates Taoism's extraordinarily rich history and remarkable variety of practice. A comprehensive bibliography for further study completes this valuable reference work.
Religion

Holding Yin, Embracing Yang

Author:

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 353

In Holding Yin, Embracing Yang, Eva Wong presents translations of three key texts containing the highest teachings of the Eastern and Western schools of Taoist internal alchemy—the discipline of cultivating health, longevity, and immortality by transforming the energetic structures of body and mind. The texts are primarily concerned with meditation, breathing practices, and sexual yoga with a partner—all as means for developing within ourselves the same life-giving energy that sustains and nourishes the universe. The texts in this collection offer a clear view of the physical, mental, and spiritual methods of Taoist practice, showing why they are important and how these methods all can work together in the cultivation of mental peace, radiant health, and longevity. This collection will provide inspiration and the essential foundation necessary to begin Taoist practice under the guidance of a teacher. The three classics translated here are: Treatise on the Mysterious Orifice by Xuanweilun (sixteenth century), Discussion on the Cavity of the Tao by Daojiaotan (nineteenth century), and Secret Teachings on the Three Wheels by Sanjubizhi (nineteenth century). Included is an introduction in which Wong discusses the various schools of internal alchemy, as well as their main practices.
Health & Fitness

A Complete Guide to Chi-Gung

Author: Daniel Reid

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 336

View: 819

Chi-gung, which literally means "energy work," is a system of cultivating health, vitality, and longevity that is based on the fundamental principles of Taoism and the laws of nature. Practiced by the Chinese for thousands of years, chi-gung works with the energy found in all living things to help rid the body of the imbalances that sap our strength and give rise to disease. The simple, meditative movements, breathing exercises, and massage techniques that are the basis of chi-gung can be practiced by anyone, regardless of age or physical fitness.
History

The Business of Alchemy

Author: Pamela H. Smith

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 955

In showing how an overriding concern with religious salvation was transformed into a concentration on material increase and economic policies, Pamela Smith depicts the rise of modern sicence and early capitalism in the 16th- and 17-century world of the Holy Roman Empire. Smith uses as example the life of Johann Joachim Becher (1635-1682), whose ideasfrom alchemy to economicstypify those of his generation. 30 photos.