Philosophy

Futurama and Philosophy

Author: Courtland Lewis

Publisher: Open Court Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 798

A collection of twenty-three essays examining the philosophical themes of the animated cartoon show about life in the year 3000, Futurama.
Philosophy

Futurama and Philosophy

Author: Courtland Lewis

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 951

Futurama is a quirky, animated sitcom created by Simpson’s mastermind, Matt Groening. It follows the adventures of a pizza delivery man transported far, far into a cosmic future of witty, sarcastic robots and one-eyed femme fatales. Since first airing on the Fox network from 1999 to 2003, Futurama’s many dedicated fans created websites and newsletters and organized Comic-Con meetups and letter-writing campaigns in hopes of learning the further adventures of Bender, Leela, Dr. Farnsworth, and the deliveryman Philip J. Fry. In the meantime, fans survived on syndicated re-runs, books, wall calendars, and four feature-length movies released on DVD and online streaming. In 2009, Fox announced that Futurama would have a future and new episodes returned to Comedy Central channel. Futurama and Philosophy will meet this new surge of interest and popularity in its Popular Culture and Philosophy series. Twenty-first-century philosophers and Futurama fans can compare notes about time travel, alternate universes, the evolution of life, artificial intelligence, and the ethical dilemmas of suicide booths, “mad” scientists like Farnsworth and robots like Bender who aspire to bad taste and “kiss-my-metal-ass” rudeness. Would “interplanetary golf” really be possible? Why is it that a fossilized dog is really “man’s best friend”? What is going on inside Dr. Zoidberg’s Freedom Lesson? Why is Bender, in fact, a responsible moral being? Is Death Intrinsically Bad? And what’s with the “Seriously Freaked Up Nature of Morality” exhibited in the show? Fans who appreciate the wit and wisdom Futurama’s characters, and especially the cosmic, existential framework in which their adventures unfold, will find Futurama and Philosophy to be a unique and lasting contribution to the Futurama reviva—at least until Philip J. Fry is unfrozen.
Philosophy

On Mirrors! Philosophy—Art—Organization

Author: Luc Peters

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 268

View: 574

This is a book about mirrors, philosophy, art and organization. It arises from the recognition that we are caught in the mirror. We are under its spell and enchanted by its reflections. Mirrors direct us without our awareness, largely because we do not perceive them as mirrors. This is problematic because mirrors are everywhere. This book explores a philosophy of mirrors, one that investigates the art of painting, cartoons, architecture, music, photography and film, as well as belching and boozing robots, ‘geil’ photographers, monkish cells, cesspools, hairy auditions and clauding. Throughout, the book uses, mutilates and expands the thoughts of philosophers like Heidegger, Sloterdijk, Deleuze, Serres, Baudrillard and Rancière. The philosophic journey offered here results in new insights and unique viewpoints, which open up the hidden, secretive world of mirrors and help us to engage in unexplored and exciting relations with them, offering a critical challenge to contemporary organization theory.
Philosophy

Ender's Game and Philosophy

Author: D. Wittkower

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 550

Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card’s award-winning 1985 novel, has been discovered and rediscovered by generations of science fiction fans, even being adopted as reading by the U.S. Marine Corps. Ender's Game and its sequels explore rich themes — the violence and cruelty of children, the role of empathy in war, and the balance of individual dignity and the social good — with compelling elements of a coming-of-age story. Ender’s Game and Philosophy brings together over 30 philosophers to engage in wide-ranging discussion on issues such as: the justifiability of pre-emptive strikes; how Ender’s disconnected and dispassionate violence is mirrored in today’s drone warfare; whether the end of saving the species can justify the most brutal means; the justifiability of lies and deception in wartime, and how military schools produce training in virtue. The authors of Ender’s Game and Philosophy challenge readers to confront the challenges that Ender’s Game presents, bringing new insights to the idea of a just war, the virtues of the soldier, the nature of childhood, and the serious work of playing games.
Philosophy

Psych and Philosophy

Author: Robert Arp

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 695

“I’m getting something,” says Shawn, assuming a look of intense concentration and pressing his fingertips to the sides of his head. Shawn Spencer uses lies, pretense, and distraction to get at the truth. But can pseudoscience and fakery really be so helpful? And if they can be, is it ethical to employ them? Psych and Philosophy takes an entertaining tour through the philosophical issues raised by a fake psychic. Can faulty logic get to the truth quicker than good logic? Are other people to blame for Shawn’s deceptions, because they’re more ready to credit him with supernatural powers than with superior natural powers? Is instinct more important than smart thinking—in police work and in life? Is it ethical to tell lies to promote the truth (and protect the public from criminals)? Almost every episode of Psych revolves around a grisly death, treated humorously by the repartee between Shawn and Gus. The show has much to tell us about human ways of coping with death, as well as about the problem of justified knowledge, the ethics of law enforcement, and the interaction of love, friendship, loyalty, and professionalism.
Philosophy

Boardwalk Empire and Philosophy

Author: Richard Greene

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 508

From Machiavellian city officials to big time mobsters (such as Arnold Rothstein, Lucky Luciano, and Al Capone) to corrupt beat cops to overzealous G-men to suffragettes to abolitionists to innocent citizens caught in the crossfire, Boardwalk Empire is replete with philosophically compelling characters who find themselves in philosophically interesting situations. As Boardwalk Empire is based on historical events, political figures and mobsters, the philosophical issues raised bear on “real life” in the way the few fictional television shows and movies do. We see parallels with the events in Boardwalk Empire and contemporary political events, and between the characters in Boardwalk Empire (good, bad, and ambiguous) and contemporary figures. It is one of the most popular HBO television shows ever and its popularity is on the rise. In this volume, twenty philosophers address issues in political philosophy, ethics, aesthetics, feminism, and metaphysics. Gregory Littman analyzes Nucky Thomson as a Machiavellian Prince. In contrast, Richard Greene casts Thomson in the role of a Nietzschean superman. Michael Da Silva looks at the complex relationship between Nucky and Jimmy (Nucky’s young protégé). Jimmy feels resentment towards Nucky for the role he played in bringing together Jimmy’s father and his very young mother. Is this resentment justified given that Jimmy would never have come into existence had his parents not met? Is there a moral difference between the harm that Nucky allowed to happen and the direct harm caused by Jimmy’s father? Don Fallis considers the ethics of lying in the seedy world of bootlegging. Agent Van Allen’s unique religious attitudes bring a warped sense of morality to the Boardwalk universe. Roberto Sirvent brings to light the moral character of Van Alden’s God. Thomson advises to “never let the truth get in the way of a good story.” Rod Carveth explores the role that storytelling pays in the series and Cam Cobb illustrates the role of deception. Pat Brace and Maria Kingsbury address “Outsiders, Alcohol and All That Jazz”—the aesthetics of Boardwalk Empire and the prohibition era. Margaret Schroeder is used as a vehicle for the female voice of the era. Rachel Robison-Greene discusses the role that gender plays in the direction of the series. Ron Hirschbein lends a Freudian Analysis. This book is directed at thoughtful fans of Boardwalk Empire. It’s the only book to address the popular show from a thoughtful yet instantly readable perspective.
Motion pictures

Sci-Phi: Science Fiction as Philosophy

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion pictures

Page:

View: 414

Open with a look at a fan-favorite episode of Doctor Who and explore the nature of paradoxes in time travel. You will also see that science fiction doesn't always have to take itself seriously to tell a great story - or to explore fascinating philosophical questions - when you turn your attention to the Futurama episode "Roswell That Ends Well."
Literary Collections

The TV-Show Futurama: Looking Backward at Present Day America

Author: Christian Schlegel

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 71

View: 565

Examination Thesis from the year 2005 in the subject American Studies - Miscellaneous, grade: 2,7, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Amerikanistik), course: Abschlussarbeit 1. Staatsexamen, language: English, abstract: It is a valid question whether an animated cartoon can be subject to a dissertation or not. It is important that it consistently comprises of satirical jokes as well as having the aspiration of teaching its viewers something; it has to make them think. A cartoon does not necessarily only have to be entertainment, neither requesting critical review nor treatment. Matt Groening describes Futurama like this: "It's about a pizza delivery boy named Fry who, on New Year's Eve 1999, gets inadvertently frozen in a cryogenics lab and wakes up 1,000 years later. The themes: If you are a loser, is it possible to reinvent yourself? How do you deal with the desire for youth, for the return of dead loved ones, and what does it mean to be finite in the universe? Boy, is this too pretentious or what?" [...] The idea of projecting problems of the present into the future has its genesis in Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward 2000-18875. Unlike famous dystopias like Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, George Orwell’s 1984, H.G. Wells’ Time Machine, or Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, Looking Backward draws a positive picture of the future in order to encourage his coevals to work towards the society he depicts. In contrast to that, dystopias use current events, like technological breakthroughs or political changes, consider a possible development and present a worst case scenario, which needs to be avoided. In the next two chapters it will be discussed whether Futurama stands in a dystopian tradition and in how far allusions to possible literary and other archetypes are important.
Science

Does Santa Exist?

Author: Eric Kaplan

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 470

Metaphysics isn't ordinarily much of a laughing matter. But in the hands of acclaimed comedy writer and scholar Eric Kaplan, a search for the truth about old St. Nick becomes a deeply insightful, laugh-out-loud discussion of the way some things exist but may not really be there. Just like Santa and his reindeer. Even after we outgrow the jolly fellow, the essential paradox persists: There are some things we dearly believe in that are not universally acknowledged as real. In Does Santa Exist? Kaplan shows how philosophy giants Bertrand Russell and Ludwig Wittgenstein strove to smooth over this uncomfortable meeting of the real and unreal - and failed. From there he turns to mysticism's attempts to resolve such paradoxes, surveying Buddhism, Taoism, early Christianity, Theosophy and even the philosophers at UC Berkeley under whom he studied. Finally, this brilliant comic writer alights on - surprise! - comedy as the ultimate resolution of the fundamental paradoxes of life, using examples from The Big Bang Theory, Monty Python's cheese shop and many other pop-culture sources. Kaplan delves deeper into what all this means, from how our physical brains work to his own personal confrontations with life's biggest questions: If we're all going to die, what's the point of anything? What is a perfect moment? What can you say about God? Or Santa?

NEA Handbook

Author: National Education Association of the United States

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 103

Fictional Philosophies

Author: Books Llc

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 68

View: 395

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 79. Chapters: 'Pataphysics, Fictional religions, Oulipo, Ingsoc, Bokononism, Fremen, Spira, Ori, Goa'uld, Grigore Cugler, The Joy of Sect, Organizations in Deus Ex: Invisible War, Religions of the Discworld, List of fictional religions, Orange Catholic Bible, Force, Askani, Religion in Futurama, Universe of The Longest Journey, Honored Matres, Philosophy of Ghost in the Shell, Religion in the Chalionese universe, History Monks, Flipism, List of Dune religions, Scientism, Mythology of Babylon 5, Elene Church, Cult of the Unwritten Book, Cainite History, Foundationism, Naming law in Sweden, Externism, Municipal Darwinism, Ouxpo, Earthseed, Resistentialism, Cainite Heresy, Book of G'Kar, Cult of Herodias, Kdaptist, Enigma Babylon One World Faith, Pseudophilosophy, Spinsterhood, Book of G'Quan, Oucipo, Universal Church of Truth, Outrapo, Divine Order, Ougrapo, Philosophaster. Excerpt: The fictional events of the Square Enix role-playing video games Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2 take place in a world called "Spira" Supira). As befits its name, Spira is characterized by cycles and repetition, such as the spiral of death that the world endures, the many spheres found in Spira, the Blitzball sphere pools, the prayer to Yevon, the Sphere Grid, and Spira's cycle of life energy emerging from within the planet's core, granting life to all its living inhabitants, and then returning to the core when a life form dies. As an invention of Square Enix, Spira is one of the first Final Fantasy worlds to feature consistent, all-encompassing spiritual and mythological influences within the planet's civilizations and their inhabitants' daily lives. The world of Spira itself is very different from the mainly European-style worlds found in previous Final Fantasy games, being much more closely modeled on southeast Asia, most notably with respect t...
Academic libraries

Choice

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Academic libraries

Page:

View: 133