Science

History of Geomorphology and Quaternary Geology

Author: R. H. Grapes

Publisher: Geological Society of London

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 937

These papers deal with various aspects of the histories of geomorphology and Quaternary geology in different parts of the world. They include: the origin of the term 'Quaternary', histories of ideas and debates relating to aspects of fluvial geomorphology, glacial geomorphology and glaciation, desert dunes and the geology of Australia, peneplains in China, a palaeo-Tokyo Bay in Japan, together with biographies of Charles Cotton, Valerija Čepulytė and Česlovas Pakuckas that highlight their respective contributions to the disciplines of geomorphology and Quaternary geology.
Science

Geomorphology

Author: Robert S. Anderson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page:

View: 551

This textbook provides a modern, quantitative and process-oriented approach to equip students with the tools to understand geomorphology. Insight into the interpretation of landscapes is developed from basic principles and simple models, and by stepping through the equations that capture the essence of the mechanics and chemistry of landscapes. Boxed worked examples and real-world applications bring the subject to life for students, allowing them to apply the theory to their own experience. The book covers cutting edge topics, including the revolutionary cosmogenic nuclide dating methods and modeling, highlights links to other Earth sciences through up-to-date summaries of current research, and illustrates the importance of geomorphology in understanding environmental changes. Setting up problems as a conservation of mass, ice, soil, or heat, this book arms students with tools to fully explore processes, understand landscapes, and to participate in this rapidly evolving field.
Science

Geographic Information Science and Mountain Geomorphology

Author: Michael Bishop

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 564

View: 940

From the reviews: "Bishop and Schroder (both, Univ. of Nebraska at Omaha) have brought together an impressive group of practitioners in the relatively new application of geographic information science to mountain geomorphology. In doing so, they have produced valuable, first, overall coverage of a high-tech approach to mountain, three-dimensional research. More than 40 contributing authors discuss a wide range of related aspects.... The book is well bound and well produced; each chapter provides an extensive source of references. The numerous line drawings are clearly reproduced, although the mediocre quality of photographic reproduction limits the value of air photographs and satellite images. As is characteristic of many edited collections, there is some variation in chapter quality. Some of the writing is so dense that it requires minute concentration--one chapter, for instance, has 14 pages of references from a total of 43 pages. Nevertheless, this is a vital compendium for a rapidly expanding field of research. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals." (J. D. Ives, Choice, March 2005)
Science

Geomorphology: Pure and Applied

Author: M.G. Hart

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 242

View: 342

This unique treatment of geomorphology, first published in 1986, provides a comprehensive work to enable students to see the subject as a whole. Taking the concepts that run through the subject and cut across its standard divisions, the book summarises the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and then describes modern developments, both pure and applied.
Science

The History of Geomorphology

Author: K.J. Tinkler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 358

View: 266

This book, first published in 1989, the proceedings of the 19th Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium, is the first set of essays focused on the history of the subject. The articles analyse the founding precepts of geomorphology, the early pioneers, the formation of a defined discipline, and the present state of the topic.
Science

Tools in Fluvial Geomorphology

Author: G. Mathias Kondolf

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 560

View: 127

Fluvial Geomorphology studies the biophysical processes acting in rivers, and the sediment patterns and landforms resulting from them. It is a discipline of synthesis, with roots in geology, geography, and river engineering, and with strong interactions with allied fields such as ecology, engineering and landscape architecture. This book comprehensively reviews tools used in fluvial geomorphology, at a level suitable to guide the selection of research methods for a given question. Presenting an integrated approach to the interdisciplinary nature of the subject, it provides guidance for researchers and professionals on the tools available to answer questions on river restoration and management. Thoroughly updated since the first edition in 2003 by experts in their subfields, the book presents state-of-the-art tools that have revolutionized fluvial geomorphology in recent decades, such as physical and numerical modelling, remote sensing and GIS, new field techniques, advances in dating, tracking and sourcing, statistical approaches as well as more traditional methods such as the systems framework, stratigraphic analysis, form and flow characterisation and historical analysis. This book: Covers five main types of geomorphological questions and their associated tools: historical framework; spatial framework; chemical, physical and biological methods; analysis of processes and forms; and future understanding framework. Provides guidance on advantages and limitations of different tools for different applications, data sources, equipment and supplies needed, and case studies illustrating their application in an integrated perspective. It is an essential resource for researchers and professional geomorphologists, hydrologists, geologists, engineers, planners, and ecologists concerned with river management, conservation and restoration. It is a useful supplementary textbook for upper level undergraduate and graduate courses in Geography, Geology, Environmental Science, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and interdisciplinary courses in river management and restoration.
Science

Seafloor Geomorphology as Benthic Habitat

Author: Peter T Harris

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 936

View: 289

The conservation of marine benthic biodiversity is a recognised goal of a number of national and international programs such as the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity (CBD). In order to attain this goal, information is needed about the distribution of life in the ocean so that spatial conservation measures such as marine protected areas (MPAs) can be designed to maximise protection within boundaries of acceptable dimensions. Ideally, a map would be produced that showed the distribution of benthic biodiversity to enable the efficient design of MPAs. The dilemma is that such maps do not exist for most areas and it is not possible at present to predict the spatial distribution of all marine life using the sparse biological information currently available. Knowledge of the geomorphology and biogeography of the seafloor has improved markedly over the past 10 years. Using multibeam sonar, the benthic ecology of submarine features such as fjords, sand banks, coral reefs, seamounts, canyons, mud volcanoes and spreading ridges has been revealed in unprecedented detail. This book provides a synthesis of seabed geomorphology and benthic habitats based on the most recent, up-to-date information. Introductory chapters explain the drivers that underpin the need for benthic habitat maps, including threats to ocean health, the habitat mapping approach based on principles of biogeography and benthic ecology and seabed (geomorphic) classification schemes. Case studies from around the world are then presented. They represent a range of seabed features where detailed bathymetric maps have been combined with seabed video and sampling to yield an integrated picture of the benthic communities that are associated with different types of benthic habitat. The final chapter examines critical knowledge gaps and future directions for benthic habitat mapping research. Reviews and compares the different methodologies currently being used Includes global case studies Provides geological expertise into what has traditionally been a biological discipline
Science

The Basics of Geomorphology

Author: Kenneth J Gregory

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 248

View: 675

"I can think of no better guides than Professors Ken Gregory and John Lewin to lead the reader through the conceptual basis of this exciting science." - Victor R. Baker, University of Arizona "A very readable and informative introduction to the discipline for senior undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers." - Angela Gurnell, Queen Mary University of London "Time will tell, but this book may well mark a turning point in the way students and scientists alike perceive Earth surface processes and landforms." - Jonathan Phillips, University of Kentucky This student focused book provides a detailed description and analysis of the key concepts, ideas, and hypotheses that inform geomorphology. Kenneth Gregory and John Lewin explain the basics of landform science in 20 concepts, each the subject of a substantive, cross-referenced entry. They use the idea of the 'geomorphic system' to organise entries in four sections, with extensive web resources provided for each: System Contexts: The Systems Approach / Uniformitarianism / Landform / Form, Process and Materials / Equilibrium / Complexity and Non Linear Dynamical Systems System Functioning: Cycles and cascades / Force-Resistance / Geomorphic work / Process Form Models System Adjustments: Timescales / Forcings / Change Trajectories / Inheritance and Sensitivity / Anthropocene Drivers for the Future: Geomorphic Hazards / Geomorphic Engineering / Design and Prediction Aligned with the teaching literature, this innovative text provides a fully-functioning learning environment for study, revision, and even self-directed research for both undergraduate and postgraduate students of geomorphology.
Science

Geomorphology of Desert Environments

Author: A. D. Abrahams

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 674

View: 634

Over the last twenty years there has been a major expansion of knowledge in the field of landforms and landforming processes of deserts. This advanced-level book provides a benchmark for the current state of science, and is written by an international team of authors who are acknowledged experts in their fields.
Science

MOUNTAIN GEOMORPHOLOGY

Author: Phil Owens

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 220

Mountains represent one of the most inspiring and attractive natural features on the surface of the earth. Visually, they dominate the landscape. However, the increasing realization of the fragility of mountain areas because of changes in land use, management and climate, combined with an understanding of their importance for water and other natural resources, has resulted in a growing interest in mountain environments in recent years. Hence, Mountain Geomorphology represents a timely and unique contribution to the literature. Written by a team of international experts, this book is divided into three sections, which consider historical, functional and applied mountain geomorphology from both global and local perspectives. Historical mountain geomorphology focuses on the evolution of landforms. Functional mountain geomorphology emphasises the interaction between processes and landforms, while applied mountain geomorphology concerns the interrelationships between geomorphological processes and society. Mountain Geomorphology is a valuable source of information for students studying mountain geomorphology, and also for academics and research scientists interested in mountain environments.