George Washington (Esprios Classics)

Author: William Roscoe Thayer

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Page: 158

View: 499

William Roscoe Thayer (January 16, 1859 - September 7, 1923) was an American author and editor who wrote about Italian history. Thayer was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He studied at St. Mark's Academy, Concord, New Hampshire, traveled with a private tutor in Europe, and graduated from Harvard University in 1881, in the class with Theodore Roosevelt. For several years, he was assistant editor of the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin. He then returned to Harvard, receiving the degree of A. M. in 1886. He was editor of the Harvard Graduates' Magazine from its foundation in 1892 until 1915. In 1903, at the International Historical Congress at Rome, he represented both Harvard University and the American Historical Association, and in 1906 was their representative at the Italian Historical Congress in Milan.

Washington Irving (Esprios Classics)

Author: Henry W Boynton

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Page: 62

View: 440

Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 - November 28, 1859) was an American short-story writer, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. He is best known for his short stories "Rip Van Winkle" (1819) and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1820), both of which appear in his collection The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. His historical works include biographies of Oliver Goldsmith, Muhammad and George Washington, as well as several histories of 15th-century Spain that deal with subjects such as Alhambra, Christopher Columbus and the Moors. Irving served as American ambassador to Spain in the 1840s.

History of the Confederate Powder Works (Esprios Classics)

Author: George Washington Rains

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN:

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Page: 36

View: 772

George Washington Rains (1817 - March 21, 1898) was a United States Army and later Confederate States Army officer. A skilled engineer and inventor; he was instrumental in providing the Confederacy with much-needed gunpowder throughout the American Civil War. He also was the younger brother of fellow Confederate general Gabriel J. Rains. When the American Civil War began Rains joined the Confederate army. George Rains became a major in the Ordnance Department and was tasked to procure, and prospect for, gunpowder ingredients and to initiate the production. His work did much for the establishment of Gen. Isaac M. St. John's Bureau of Nitre and Mining, to which he transferred, in 1862. Being promoted to lieutenant colonel, he went to Augusta, Georgia and established the Confederate Powder works at the Augusta Arsenal.
Fiction

John March, Southerner (Esprios Classics)

Author: George W. Cable

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 199

George Washington Cable (October 12, 1844 - January 31, 1925) was an American novelist notable for the realism of his portrayals of Creole life in his native New Orleans, Louisiana. He has been called "the most important southern artist working in the late 19th century", as well as "the first modern Southern writer." In his treatment of racism, mixed-race families and miscegenation, his fiction has been thought to anticipate that of William Faulkner. He also wrote articles critical of contemporary society. Due to hostility against him after two 1885 essays encouraging racial equality and opposing Jim Crow, Cable moved with his family to Northampton, Massachusetts. He lived there for the next thirty years, then moved to Florida.
Young women

Aunt Jane's Nieces on Vacation (Esprios Classics)

Author: Edith Van Dyne

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Young women

Page: 305

View: 620

Uncle John and his nieces vacation at their farm in Millville where they start a local newspaper and investigate a mystery.
Fiction

The Bobbin Boy; Or, How Nat Got His Learning (Esprios Classics)

Author: William M. Thayer

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 230

View: 906

Reverend William Makepeace Thayer (1820-1898) was an American author. His works include: Sermon on Moses' Fugitive Slave Bill (1850), Happy New Year (1853), Gem and Casket (1854), Spots in our Feasts of Charity (1854), Trial of the Spirits (1855), Morning Star (1856), Poor Boy and Merchant Prince (1857), Pioneer Boy, and How He Became President (1863), Nelson (1878), Tact, Push and Principle (1880), George Washington: His Boyhood and Manhood (1883), From the Tannery to the White House (1887), From Boyhood to Manhood: Life of Benjamin Franklin (1890) and Turning Points in Successful Careers (1895).

Lola; Or, The Thought and Speech of Animals (Esprios Classics)

Author: Henny Kindermann

Publisher:

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Page: 154

View: 713

Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 - November 28, 1859) was an American short-story writer, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. He is best known for his short stories "Rip Van Winkle" (1819) and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1820), both of which appear in his collection The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. His historical works include biographies of Oliver Goldsmith, Muhammad and George Washington, as well as several histories of 15th-century Spain that deal with subjects such as Alhambra, Christopher Columbus and the Moors. Irving served as American ambassador to Spain in the 1840s.

The Last Leaf (Esprios Classics)

Author: James Kendall Hosmer

Publisher:

ISBN:

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Page: 190

View: 918

James Kendall Hosmer (born in Northfield, Massachusetts, 29 January 1834; died 11 May 1927) was a United States educator, historian and writer. Hosmer was the son of Unitarian clergyman George Washington Hosmer. He graduated from Harvard in 1855. He then studied theology, and became pastor for a Unitarian congregation in Deerfield, Massachusetts, in 1860. During the American Civil War, he served in the 52nd Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers. After the war, he felt himself unsuited for the ministry, and decided to seek other occupations. He was professor at Antioch College 1866-1872. From 1872 to 1874, he occupied the chair of English and German literature in the University of Missouri, and in 1874 was elected to a similar professorship in Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.

Beginnings of the American People (Esprios Classics)

Author: Carl Becker

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 216

View: 402

Carl Lotus Becker (September 7, 1873 - April 10, 1945) was an American historian. Carl Becker's 1915 The Beginnings of the American People is often cited for a description of "colonial merchants" as "sunshine patriots." The "sunshine patriot" only appeared once in this book, and that in a quotation from Thomas Paine's first American Crisis essay, which concluded a series of parallelisms that in turn presaged the introduction of General George Washington to the narrative. Becker is best known for The Heavenly City of the Eighteenth-Century Philosophers (1932), four lectures on The Enlightenment delivered at Yale University.
Biography & Autobiography

From Boyhood to Manhood: Life of Benjamin Franklin (Esprios Classics)

Author: William M. Thayer

Publisher: Blurb

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 364

View: 636

Reverend William Makepeace Thayer (1820-1898) was an American author. His works include: Sermon on Moses' Fugitive Slave Bill (1850), Happy New Year (1853), Gem and Casket (1854), Spots in our Feasts of Charity (1854), Trial of the Spirits (1855), Morning Star (1856), Poor Boy and Merchant Prince (1857), Pioneer Boy, and How He Became President (1863), Nelson (1878), Tact, Push and Principle (1880), George Washington: His Boyhood and Manhood (1883), From the Tannery to the White House (1887), From Boyhood to Manhood: Life of Benjamin Franklin (1890) and Turning Points in Successful Careers (1895).