Architecture

Glasshouses

Author: Fiona Grant

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 72

View: 944

Since the early seventeenth century, when the cultivation of exotic plants and fruit became fashionable in northern Europe, glasshouses have offered an artificial climate in which they could flourish. At first these structures were within reach only of the very richest, and growing one's own oranges, orchids, pineapples or bananas was a sign of great wealth; but by the mid-nineteenth century manufacturers emerged to cater for a growing middle-class market. Glasshouses became increasingly sophisticated, with different types tailored to house specific crops, and manufacturers competing with one another by developing their own house styles, leading to a wealth of designs endlessly fascinating to the garden or architectural historian. In Glasshouses, Fiona Grant provides an illustrated introduction to the subject, including the twentieth century decline and recent attempts at restoration.
Poetry

Glasshouses

Author: Stuart Barnes

Publisher: Univ. of Queensland Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 104

View: 965

Glasshouses is an inventive, incandescent collection by one of Australia's most talented new poets. Drawing on a number of complex techniques, Stuart Barnes illuminates both city and coastal life, with allusions to classical and contemporary culture. Replete with extraordinary imagery, the poems maintain a beautiful accessibility and coherence despite their continually twisting, even disjointed figures.
History

Glasshouses and Glass Manufacturers of the Pittsburgh Region

Author: Jay W. Hawkins

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 612

View: 981

The Pittsburgh region, while well known for steelmaking, was likewise an important glass manufacturing center in this country's history. This book provides detailed accounts of the region's glassmakers from the first factory dating to 1795 through 1910. Glassmaking started out modestly with small glasshouses in Pittsburgh and up the Monongahela River in New Geneva during the final few years of the 18th century. By the close of the 19th century, the Pittsburgh region was producing more than half of all domestic window glass and the lion's share of most other forms of glass in the United States. The original purpose of this manuscript was to assemble and record as accurately as possible the history of all of the glassworks and the glass manufacturers that operated them in Pittsburgh and the immediate surrounding region. This book was designed to be a reference guide for anyone who is interested in the history of glass in western Pennsylvania. The years companies were operating, where the glassworks were located, what types of glass and specific glass items did they make, and what marks did they use is just some of the information that can be found in this book. There are hundreds of individual companies and name changes listed in this volume. It contains as much information about each company that could practically be included. Even the most minor name or address change was recorded exactly as noted by contemporary sources. As much as possible, contemporary reference sources, such as city directories, early newspapers, maps, and journals were used to provide accurate and complete histories of the glasshouses. Generally, the better-known companies will have much more of their history available. However, every known glassmaker and glasshouse was included, regardless of how little information about them could be found. This book is intended to aid researchers in the determination of the age and the origin of marked pieces as well as narrowing down potential manufacturers of unmarked objects. The liberal reproduction of original advertisements and maps as well as the photographs of glass marks were included to complement and augment the narrative. The format of this book was established to facilitate its use as a reference guide.
Architecture

Glasshouses

Author: Fiona Grant

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 72

View: 938

Since the early seventeenth century, when the cultivation of exotic plants and fruit became fashionable in northern Europe, glasshouses have offered an artificial climate in which they could flourish. At first these structures were within reach only of the very richest, and growing one's own oranges, orchids, pineapples or bananas was a sign of great wealth; but by the mid-nineteenth century manufacturers emerged to cater for a growing middle-class market. Glasshouses became increasingly sophisticated, with different types tailored to house specific crops, and manufacturers competing with one another by developing their own house styles, leading to a wealth of designs endlessly fascinating to the garden or architectural historian. In Glasshouses, Fiona Grant provides an illustrated introduction to the subject, including the twentieth century decline and recent attempts at restoration.
Gardening

Glasshouse Greenhouse

Author: India Hobson

Publisher: Pavilion

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 224

View: 253

The authors have a talent for storytelling through images the photography throughout is exceptional.
Science

Ascent!

Author: Lawrie Ryan

Publisher: Nelson Thornes

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 864

This series is focused on delivering custom materials which are designed and presented to meet the needs of enthusiastic and committed students. The resources are written at an average reading ability level, but with full and proper use of scientific terminology throughout. Ascent! also has its own text-linked website: www.nelsonthornes.com/ascent
Architecture

Bruno Taut's Design Inspiration for the Glashaus

Author: David Nielsen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 172

View: 743

As a formative exemplar of early architectural modernism, Bruno Taut’s seminal exhibition pavilion the Glashaus (literally translated Glasshouse) is logically part of the important debate of rethinking the origins of modernism. However, the historical record of Bruno Taut’s Glashaus has been primarily established by one art historian and critic. As a result the historical record of the Glashaus is significantly skewed toward a singlular notion of Expressionism and surprisingly excludes Taut’s diverse motives for the design of the building. In an effort to clarify the problematic historical record of the Glashaus, this book exposes Bruno Taut’s motives and inspirations for its design. The result is that Taut’s motives can be found in yet unacknowledged precedents like the botanical inspiration of the Victoria regia lily; the commercial interests of Frederick Keppler as the Director of the Deutche Luxfer Prismen Syndikat; and imitation that derived openly from the Gothic. The outcome is a substantial contribution to the re-evaluation of the generally accepted histories of the modern movement in architecture.
Greenhouse management

Glasshouses

Author: P. G. Jackson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Greenhouse management

Page: 122

View: 171

History

Chinese Market Gardening in Australia and New Zealand

Author: Joanna Boileau

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 327

View: 291

This book offers a fresh perspective on the Chinese diaspora. It is about the mobilisation of knowledge across time and space, exploring the history of Chinese market gardening in Australia and New Zealand. It enlarges our understanding of processes of technological change and human mobility, highlighting the mobility of migrants as an essential element in the mobility and adaptation of technologies. Truly multidisciplinary, Chinese Market Gardening in Australia and New Zealand incorporates elements of economic, agricultural, social, cultural and environmental history, along with archaeology, to document how Chinese market gardeners from subtropical southern China adapted their horticultural techniques and technologies to novel environments and the demands of European consumers. It shows that they made a significant contribution to the economies of Australia and New Zealand, developing flexible strategies to cope with the vagaries of climate and changing business and social environments which were often hostile towards Asian immigrants. Chinese Market Gardening in Australia and New Zealand will appeal to students and scholars in the fields of the Chinese diaspora, in particular the history of the Chinese in Australasia; the history of technology; horticultural and garden history; and environmental history, as well as Asian studies more generally.
Fiction in English, 1945- - Texts

Glasshouses

Author: Penelope Farmer

Publisher: Victor Gollancz

ISBN:

Category: Fiction in English, 1945- - Texts

Page: 215

View: 401

BLE. Grace, a talented glass-blower takes a cottage in Derbyshire accompanied by her apprentice Terry. Their relationship is disturbed by a man-hating ghost and further complications arise when Grace's ex-husband makes an appearance.
History

London's Industrial Heritage

Author: Geoff Marshall

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 515

Did you know that apart from Lancashire, the greatest concentration of Boulton & Watt steam engines was in London, demonstrating the enormous and often overlooked significance of London as an industrial centre? The story behind the many industries found in the capital is described in this unique book. London once had scores of breweries; the world’s first plastic material was synthesised in the East End; there was even a gasworks opposite the Palace of Westminster. Clerkenwell was a centre for watch and clock makers; the River Thames used to be full of colliers bringing coal from Newcastle; Joseph Bramah invented his water closet and hydraulic pump here, and Henry Maudslay made machines to make machines. Many household names began in London: Schweppes, Crosse & Blackwell, and Vauxhall motor cars. The list of fascinating facts goes on. In this, the first book of its kind on the subject, Geoff Marshall provides an enthralling overview of London’s industrial face through history.
History

Glass in Northwest Ohio

Author: Quentin R. Skrabec, Jr.

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 436

The discovery of natural gas around Findlay in 1886 started an industrial rush in northwest Ohio. Within five years, over 100 glass companies had moved into the region for free gas and railroad connections to the western markets. Unfortunately the gas ran out in just a few years, and many glass companies moved on, but those that stayed changed the nature of the glass industry forever. A brilliant inventor, Michael Owens of Libbey Glass automated the glass-making process after 3,000 years of no change. His automated bottle-making machine changed American life with the introduction of the milk bottle, beer bottle, glass jar, baby bottle, and soda bottle. It also eliminated child labor in the glass factories. Owens also automated the production of fl at glass by 1920. By 1930, over 85 percent of the world's glass was being produced on the machines of Michael Owens, bestowing the title of "Glass Capital of the World" upon northwest Ohio.
Juvenile Fiction

The Glasshouse

Author: Paul Collins

Publisher: Ford Street Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 32

View: 305

Clara lives in her balanced world where everything is perfect. Her glasshouse is free of bugs, her prized pumpkins free blemishes. But then one day a boy walks into her life and slowly Clara realises that her world is not perfect at all. paranoia spreads and she loses all her customers. Finally, she must face up to the realisation that her world is not perfect, and she must make allowances and compromise if she is to survive.
Greenhouse management

Science and the Glasshouse

Author: William John Cooper Lawrence

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Greenhouse management

Page: 174

View: 403