Science

Global Change and Baltic Coastal Zones

Author: Gerald Schernewski

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 298

View: 251

Climate change and ongoing transformation processes in economy and agriculture will have strong and multiple impacts in the Baltic region. In particular coastal zones face increasing hazards, e.g. due to sea level rise or changes in riverine nutrient loads and eutrophication. These changes also offer a wide range of new opportunities in the Baltic Region. Adaptation measures are needed but require a thorough and spatially differentiated understanding of underlying ecological, economic and social processes. Sixteen contributions by authors from eight countries give a comprehensive overview of these changes, their consequences and practical challenges with focus on coastal zones. Besides risks, the chances and opportunities of changes for the region are addressed and adaptation examples and strategies are given. The practitioners’ perspective and their demands are integrated in the various contributions.
Science

Global Change and Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems

Author: Walter C. Oechel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 493

View: 648

Global warming is likely to have the greatest impact at high latitudes, making the Arctic an important region both for detecting global climate change and for studying its effects on terrestrial ecosystems. The chapters in this volume address current and anticipated impacts of global climate change on Arctic organisms, populations, ecosystem structure and function, biological diversity, and the atmosphere.
Science

Forest Landscapes and Global Change

Author: João C. Azevedo

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 262

View: 139

Climate change, urban sprawl, abandonment of agriculture, intensification of forestry and agriculture, changes in energy generation and use, expansion of infrastructure networks, habitat destruction and degradation, and other drivers of change occur at increasing rates. They affect patterns and processes in forest landscapes, and modify ecosystem services derived from those ecosystems. Consequently, rapidly changing landscapes present many new challenges to scientists and managers. While it is not uncommon to encounter the terms “global change” and “landscape” together in the ecological literature, a global analyses of drivers of change in forest landscapes, and their ecological consequences have not been addressed adequately. That is the goal of this volume: an exploration of the state of knowledge of global changes in forested landscapes with emphasis on causes and effects, and challenges faced by researchers and land managers. Initial chapters identify and describe major agents of landscape change: climate, fire, and human activities. The next series of chapters address implications of changes on ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation and carbon flux. A chapter that describes methodologies of detecting and monitoring landscape changes is presented followed by chapter that highlights the many challenges forest landscape managers face amidst of global change. Finally, we present a summary and a synthesis of the main points presented in the book. Each chapter will contain the individual research experiences of chapter authors, augmented by review and synthesis of global scientific literature on relevant topics, as well as critical input from multiple peer reviewers.
Nature

Global Climate Change Linkages

Author: James C. White

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 262

View: 476

Proceedings of a conference sponsored by the Air Resources Information Clearinghouse ARIC, a project of the Center for Environmental Information, Inc.
Nature

Global Change

Author: H. C. Brookfield

Publisher: Australian Government Pub Service

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 102

View: 586

Climatic changes

Global Change

Author: Bruce G. Thom

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Climatic changes

Page: 178

View: 627

Science

Climate Change

Author: Mark Maslin

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 187

View: 152

Previous editions published as: Global warming.
Science

Global Climate Change and Terrestrial Invertebrates

Author: Scott N. Johnson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 509

Invertebrates perform such vital roles in global ecosystems—and so strongly influence human wellbeing—that biologist E.O. Wilson was prompted to describe them as “little things that run the world.” As they are such powerful shapers of the world around us, their response to global climate change is also pivotal in meeting myriad challenges looming on the horizon—everything from food security and biodiversity to human disease control. This book presents a comprehensive overview of the latest scientific knowledge and contemporary theory relating to global climate change and terrestrial invertebrates. Featuring contributions from top international experts, this book explores how changes to invertebrate populations will affect human decision making processes across a number of crucial issues, including agriculture, disease control, conservation planning, and resource allocation. Topics covered include methodologies and approaches to predict invertebrate responses, outcomes for disease vectors and ecosystem service providers, underlying mechanisms for community level responses to global climate change, evolutionary consequences and likely effects on interactions among organisms, and many more. Timely and thought-provoking, Global Climate Change and Terrestrial Invertebrates offers illuminating insights into the profound influence the simplest of organisms may have on the very future of our fragile world.

Climate Change: An Archaeological Study

Author: John D Grainger

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 224

View: 117

Global warming is among the most urgent problems facing the world today. Yet many commentators, and even some scientists, discuss it with reference only to the changing climate of the last century or so. John Grainger takes a longer view and draws on the archaeological evidence to show how our ancestors faced up to the ending of the last Ice Age, arguably a more dramatic climate change crisis than the present one. Ranging from the Paleolithic down to the development of agriculture in the Neolithic, the author shows how human ingenuity and resourcefulness allowed them to adapt to the changing conditions in a variety of ways as the ice sheets retreated and water levels rose. Different strategies, from big game hunting on the ice, nomadic hunter gathering, sedentary foraging and finally farming, were developed in various regions in response to local conditions as early man colonized the changing world. The human response to climate change was not to try to stop it, but to embrace technology and innovation to cope with it.
Science

The Oxford Companion to Global Change

Author: Master Andrew Goudie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 684

View: 304

"The Oxford Companion to Global Change provides a concise guide to the realities of a planet in transition, covering such crucial topics as the threat of declining crude oil production, the status of coal-burning technology, and the future of nuclear power. Over 150 scientists and specialists, led by David J. Cuff and Andrew S. Goudie of Temple University and Oxford University respectively, contribute entries on key subjects, demonstrating the social, political, and technological interrelationships between them."--BOOK JACKET.
Political Science

Democracy and Climate Change

Author: Frederic Hanusch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 367

Democracy and Climate Change explores the various ways in which democratic principles can lead governments to respond differently to climate change. The election cycle can lead to short-termism, which often appears to be at odds with the long-term nature of climate change, with its latency between cause and effect. However, it is clear that some democracies deal with climate change better than others, and this book demonstrates that overall stronger democratic qualities tend to correlate with improved climate performance. Beginning by outlining a general concept of democratic efficacy, the book provides an empirical analysis of the influence of the quality of democracy on climate change performance across dozens of countries. The specific case study of Canada’s Kyoto Protocol process is then used to explain the mechanisms of democratic influence in depth. The wide-ranging research presented in the book opens up several new and exciting avenues of enquiry and will be of considerable interest to researchers with an interest in comparative politics, democracy studies and environmental policies.
Science

The Ocean's Role in Global Change

Author: National Research Council

Publisher: National Academy Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 85

View: 677

What role does the ocean play in global climate change? Although not fully understood, there is general agreement that it is significant. Therefore, the scientific community has initiated large-scale research programs based on studies of the ocean and its relation to global climate and climate-related processes. This volume provides brief summaries and reports on the progress of the major oceanographic research programs. It looks at both programs that study processes that occur over periods ranging from days to hundreds of yearsâ€"the contemporary systemâ€"and those that seek to understand long-term variations ranging from thousands to millions of yearsâ€"the geological perspective.
Business & Economics

Transnational Climate Change Governance

Author: Harriet Bulkeley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 250

View: 215

Leading experts provide the first comprehensive account of transnational efforts to respond to climate change, for researchers, graduate students and policy makers.