Travel

Great Houses of London

Author: James Stourton

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 327

'This lavishly illustrated compendium suggest that the age of elegance endures' Mail on Sunday The great houses of London represent one of the marvels of English architecture and yet they are almost entirely unknown. They are for the most part disguised behind sober facades but their riches within are astonishing. There are many architectural wonders, among them Robert Adam's 20 St James's Square and William Burges's Tower House. Several - including Bridgewater House with its Raphaels and Titians - have held great art collections. These are houses that hold extraordinary stories: half the Cabinet resigned after breakfast at Stratford House; and on 4 August 1914, at 9 Carlton House Terrace, then the German Embassy, young duty clerk Harold Nicholson deftly substituted one declaration of war for another. Great Houses of London opens the door to some of the greatest and grandest houses in the world to tell the stories of their owners and occupants, artists and architects, their restoration, adaptation and change.
Architecture

Great Houses of London

Author: James Stourton

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 352

View: 446

"This magnificent book, the fullest account ever written on its absorbing subject, will come as a revelation, even to those who think they know London, for many of the great town mansions featured in it, a good number of which are still in private occupation, are very little known and have never been illustrated before… a major contribution to British architectural and social history." - Professor David Watkin, Professor Emeritus, Department of History of Art, University of Cambridge The great houses of London represent one of the marvels of English architecture and yet they are almost entirely unknown. They are for the most part disguised behind sober facades but their riches within are astonishing. From the romantic 17th century Ashburnham House, nestling in the shadow of Westminster Abbey, through the splendid 18th century aristocratic palaces of the West End, to the curious and quirky arts and crafts houses of Holland Park and Kensington, to the cool modernist houses of Hampstead and the exuberant post-modern interiors of the last thirty years, every house has its own story to tell.
Art

The Great Houses of London

Author: David Pearce

Publisher: Vendome Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 679

The Great Houses of London is an account of extraordinary buildings, most of which no longer exist, of such great designers as Robert Adam, and of the enormously rich English aristocratic grandees who commissioned these houses. When Queen Victoria remarked to her neighbor, the Duchess of Sutherland, I have come from my house to your palace, she was by no means exaggerating. The palaces of the nobility were second only to churches in architectural and aesthetic significance, and defied comparison with the chateaux of France or the palazzi of Venice. Filled with astonishing French and English furniture, generally equipped with a large private picture gallery to display priceless paintings bought on the Grand Tour, staffed by between 50 and 60 servants, these houses expressed the taste and aspiration of a single person, and usually one rich and powerful enough to have his own way. A distinguished designer, large rooms for entertaining formally, an imposing facade to impress passers by and visitors were the background for the endless balls and costume and garden parties, and formal dinners that made the dazzling London Season one of the high points for European royalty and society from June through August. This book, the only publication on a fascinating subject, covers some 40 major home and 100 lesser ones, starting in the 13th century in the walled city of London and moving on to the then suburbs of Bloomsbury, Holborn, Soho, Piccadilly and St. James, finishing in Park Lane from which the aristocrats were driven by the noises of motor traffic. This is a book that will fascinate architects, decorators, Anglophiles and social historians.
Architecture, Domestic

Private Palaces

Author: Christopher Simon Sykes

Publisher: Viking Adult

ISBN:

Category: Architecture, Domestic

Page: 352

View: 704

Architecture

Modern Aristocrats

Author: James Reginato

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 415

This stunning book presents the intriguing stories and celebrated histories of some of the leading families of Great Britain and Ireland and the opulent residences that have defined their heritages. The history of England is inextricably linked with the stories of its leading aristocratic dynasties and the great seats they have occupied for centuries. As the current owners speak of the critical roles their ancestors have played in the nation, they bring history alive. All of these houses have survived great wars, economic upheavals, and, at times, scandal. Filled with stunning photography, this book is a remarkably intimate and lively look inside some of Britain’s stateliest houses, with the modern-day aristocrats who live in them and keep them going in high style.This book presents a tour of some of England’s finest residences, with many of the interiors shown here for the first time. It includes Blenheim Palace—seven acres under one roof, eclipsing the splendor of any of the British royal family’s residences—property of the Dukes of Marlborough; the exquisite Old Vicarage in Derbyshire, last residence of the late Dowager Duchess of Devonshire (née Deborah Mitford); Haddon Hall, a vast crenellated 900-year-old manor house belonging to the Dukes of Rutland that has been called the most romantic house in England; and the island paradises on Mustique and St. Lucia of the 3rd Baron Glenconner. This book is perfect for history buffs and lovers of traditional interior design and English country life."
True Crime

Murder Houses of South London

Author: Jan Bondeson

Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 200

View: 157

South London has a long and blood-spattered history of capital crime and many of its murder houses still stand today. There are many forgotten murders in South London, where only the murder house remains... Murder mysteries fill the pages of this book – some of them celebrated crimes, like the murder of Charles Bravo at Balham in 1876. Others remain forgotten tragedies, like the murder of Jane Soper in the Borough in 1875. This book will take you on a journey through some of the most notorious crimes in South London, including the Brixton Matricide, the Battersea Tragedy and the Tooting Horror.
History

The Mendicant Houses of Medieval London, 1221-1539

Author: Jens Röhrkasten

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 670

View: 147

The mendicant Orders had a profound impact on urban society, life and culture from the thirteenth century onwards. Being engaged in extensive and ambitious pastoral activities they depended on outside support for their material existence. Their influence extended into ecclesiastical as well as secular affairs, leading to the creation of a network of connections to different social groups and on occasion even an involvement in politics. The role of the mendicants in a medieval capital has not yet been systematically studied. A first attempt to study a city of this scale is here made for London.
True Crime

Murder Houses of London

Author: Jan Bondeson

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 352

View: 846

Which of London's most gruesome murders happened in your street? And were they committed by Jack the Ripper, the Kray twins, the Blackout Ripper or ‘Acid Bath’ Haigh?
History

Great Houses, Moats and Mills on the South Bank of the Thames

Author: Simon Blatherwick

Publisher: Museum of London Archaeology Svc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 323

Regeneration in the 1980s-90s on the south bank of the Thames resulted in archaeological and historical investigations at Platform Wharf, Rotherhithe, and next to London Bridge, in Southwark. The development of both sites from the 14th century is of major interest. The Rotherhithe property was acquired c 1349 by Edward III and the existing house rebuilt by him in 1353-61 with two courts, including a riverside range of apartments. Royal interest ceased after Edward's reign, and the house passed to Bermondsey Priory in 1399. The fragmentation of the site into smaller properties, including ones with industrial uses, is charted. The Southwark site contained three notable residences during the medieval period and tidal mills on the waterfront. The 14th-century moated house of the Dunley family and a pleasure-house built by Edward II, the Rosary, were both acquired by Sir John Fastolf for his own grand London residence in the 1440s. In the later 16th century there was massive immigration into this part of Southwark and by the mid 17th century the former moats and gardens were built over with small properties and alleys. The moat infills produced exceptionally rich assemblages of domestic artefacts and ceramics, the waterside location preserved a wide variety of plants, timber structures and woodworking evidence.
Castles

Great English Homes

Author: Mark Bence-Jones

Publisher: Crescent

ISBN:

Category: Castles

Page: 240

View: 749

A look at the dynasties of England and Wales portrays the grand world of the British upper class
Social Science

London Bridge and its Houses, c. 1209-1761

Author: Dorian Gerhold

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 966

London Bridge lined with houses from end to end was one of the most extraordinary structures ever seen in London. It was home to over 500 people, perched above the rushing waters of the Thames, and was one of the city’s main shopping streets. It is among the most familiar images of London in the past, but little has previously been known about the houses and the people who lived and worked in them. This book uses plentiful newly-discovered evidence, including detailed descriptions of nearly every house, to tell the story of the bridge and its houses and inhabitants. With the new information it is possible to reconstruct the plan of the bridge and houses in the seventeenth century, to trace the history of each house back through rentals and a survey to 1358, revealing the original layout, to date most of the houses which appear in later views, and to show how the houses and their occupants changed during five and half centuries. The book describes what stopped the houses falling into the river, how the houses were gradually enlarged, what their layout was inside, what goods were sold on the bridge and how these changed over time, the extensive rebuilding in 1477-1548 and 1683-96, and the removal of the houses around 1760. There are many new discoveries - about the structure of the bridge, the width of the roadway, the original layout of the houses, how the houses were supported, the size and internal planning of the houses, the quality of their architecture, and the trades practised on the bridge. The book includes five newly-commissioned reconstruction drawings showing what we now know about the bridge and its houses.
Architecture

Medieval London Houses

Author: John Schofield

Publisher: Paul Mellon Ctr for Studies

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 272

View: 775

A comprehensive study of domestic buildings in London from about 1200 to the Great Fire in 1666. John Schofield describes houses and such related buildings as almshouses, taverns, inns, shops and livery company halls, drawing on evidence from surviving buildings, archaeological excavations, documents, panoramas, drawn surveys and plans, contemporary descriptions, and later engravings and photographs. Schofield presents an overview of the topography of the medieval city, reconstructing its streets, defences, many religious houses and fine civic buildings. He then provides details about the mediaeval and Tudor London house: its plan, individual rooms and spaces and their functions, the roofs, floors and windows, the materials of construction and decoration, and the internal fittings and furniture. Throughout the text he discusses what this evidence tells us about the special restrictions or pleasures of living in the capital; how certain innovations of plan and construction first occurred in London before spreading to other towns; and how notions of privacy developed. in the City of London and its immediate environs.
Fiction

Famous Houses and Literary Shrines of London

Author: Arthur Adcock

Publisher: Litres

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 5185

View: 138

"Famous Houses and Literary Shrines of London" by Arthur St. John Adcock. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.