History

Harvey Houses of New Mexico

Author: Rosa Walston Latimer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 116

The Santa Fe Line and the famous Fred Harvey restaurants forever changed New Mexico and the Southwest, bringing commerce, culture and opportunity to a desolate frontier. The first Harvey Girls ever hired staffed the Raton location. In a departure from the ubiquitous black and white uniform immortalized by Judy Garland in 1946's Harvey Girls, many of New Mexico's Harvey Girls wore colorful dresses reflective of local culture. In Albuquerque, the Harvey-managed Alvarado Hotel doubled as a museum for carefully curated native art. Join author Rosa Walston Latimer and discover New Mexico's unique history of hospitality the "Fred Harvey way."
History

Fred Harvey Houses of the Southwest

Author: Richard Melzer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 968

The Fred Harvey name will forever be associated with the high-quality restaurants, hotels, and resorts situated along the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway in the American Southwest. The Fred Harvey Company surprised travelers, who were accustomed to "dingy beaneries" staffed with "rough waiters," by presenting attractive, courteous servers known as the Harvey Girls. Today many Harvey Houses serve as museums, offices, and civic centers throughout the Southwest. Only a few Harvey Houses remain as first-class hotels, and they are located at the Grand Canyon, in Winslow, Arizona, and in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Travel

Harvey Houses of Arizona: Historic Hospitality from Winslow to the Grand Canyon

Author: Rosa Walston Latimer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 144

View: 640

Valuing food quality as much as quality service, Harvey Houses changed the culture of western railroad towns. After Fred Harvey's death in 1901, sons Ford and Byron expanded the family business along the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe rail lines. El Tovar opened in 1905 on the south rim of the Grand Canyon, signaling the arrival of the iconic brand to Arizona. New railroad depots and Harvey establishments reminiscent of the Spanish Colonial-Indian pueblo style of architecture followed. Well-paid European chefs trained every kitchen, and waitresses hailed from every walk of life. Author Rosa Walston Latimer celebrates hospitality the "Fred Harvey way" through the personal stories of the famous Harvey Girls and staff of luxury Harvey hotels in Ash Fork, Seligman, Williams, Winslow and beyond.
Cooking

Harvey Houses of Kansas

Author: Rosa Walston Latimer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 144

View: 894

Starting in Kansas, Fred Harvey's iconic Harvey House was the first to set the standard for fine dining and hospitality across the rugged Southwest. In 1876, the first of Harvey's depot restaurants opened in Topeka, followed just a few years later by the first combination hotel and restaurant in Florence. Fred Harvey and the Harvey Girls introduced good food and manners to the land of Bat Masterson, Wyatt Earp and raucous cattle drives. In her third book on the Harvey House legacy, author Rosa Walston Latimer goes back to where it all began in this history of hospitality from the Sunflower State.
Biography & Autobiography

Heroes and Villains of New Mexico

Author: Bud Russo

Publisher: Sunstone Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 164

View: 614

Some of these tales are about genuine heroes. Some are about dastardly villains. Others you’ll have to decide for yourself: hero or villain? You’ll recognize these people, even if you don’t remember their names. They are Spanish colonials, Mexicans, and Anglos all the way to the present. They are even aboriginal Americans predating the arrival of Europeans. These are personal tales—gossip, you might say—and, when you finish a story, if you’re like me, you’ll be able to say, “I didn’t know that!” Now, don’t you think knowing the quirks and grit of those who peopled the pages of your history textbooks—rather than all those dates and places—is more interesting? The author always thought so. After a dozen years writing travel stories about New Mexico, he undertook writing yarns of adventure, intrigue, failure, and even death. Open the book to Elfego Baca’s story and learn why one Mexican had no fear of American cowboys. Or how Navajo Chester Nez, who was denied the right to speak his native language, used Navajo words to help win World War II. Or even how the haughty wife of a colonial governor was falsely denounced to the Inquisition as a Crypto-Jew. Fact or imagination? Sometimes it’s hard to know which it is, but these, at least, are true life episodes. Includes Readers Guide.
Juvenile Fiction

Harvey Girl

Author: Sheila Wood Foard

Publisher: Texas Tech University Press

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 152

View: 215

In 1919, fourteen-year-old Clara Fern Massie runs away from her family's farm in Missouri to earn a living and find adventure as a Harvey Girl, one of the waitresses who worked at Harvey House restaurants along the railroads in the Southwest United States.
Cooking

The Harvey House Cookbook

Author: George H. Foster

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publications

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 194

View: 140

In the 1870s, people traveling west of the Mississippi were still venturing into the wild. Loud, smoke-belching trains might have cut across the rough terrain, but harsh weather, rigid seats, and short breaks for bad food in the middle of nowhere showed the West was by no means won. Entrepreneur Fred Harvey had an eye for such problems and a nerve for the impossible. In 1876, he began establishing high-quality dining rooms along the Santa Fe Railroad, and his Harvey Houses helped change the entire picture of the American West. Recapture the spirit of the first western railway excursions with The Harvey House Cookbook. Its 200-plus vintage recipes, numerous period photos, and fascinating stories will take readers back to one of America's legendary experiences in the Old West.
History

More Than Petticoats: Remarkable New Mexico Women, 2nd

Author: Beverly West

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 889

New Mexico has not always been the "Land of Enchantment." It was shaped into the great state that it is today by remarkable people throughout history. More than Petticoats: Remarkable New Mexico Women describes the lives of female teachers, writers, entrepreneurs, and artists who helped to create the state of New Mexico and change the face of American history.
Transportation

Harvey Houses of Texas

Author: Rosa Walston Latimer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 128

View: 654

On the eve of the twentieth century, small-town Texas was still wild country lacking in the commodities and cultural centers of larger cities. This changed, however, with the arrival of the Santa Fe rail line, followed quickly by the Harvey House. Established in Kansas by English immigrant Fred Harvey, Harvey Houses could be found throughout the Southwest and adjoined local depots in sixteen Texas towns. Found in every corner of the state, Harvey Houses were not just restaurants and hotels for weary, hungry travelers but were also bustling social centers and often the only commercial outlet for the communities that developed around them. Author Rosa Walston Latimer tells the history of hospitality the "Fred Harvey way" in turn-of-the-century Texas, woven from personal stories of the famous "Harvey Girls" and other employees of Texas Harvey Houses.

American Cowboy

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 118

View: 661

Published for devotees of the cowboy and the West, American Cowboy covers all aspects of the Western lifestyle, delivering the best in entertainment, personalities, travel, rodeo action, human interest, art, poetry, fashion, food, horsemanship, history, and every other facet of Western culture. With stunning photography and you-are-there reportage, American Cowboy immerses readers in the cowboy life and the magic that is the great American West.
History

The Harvey Girls

Author: Lesley Poling-Kempes

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 653

The award-winning history of the women who went West to work in Fred Harvey's restaurants along the Santa Fe railway -- and went on to shape the American Southwest From the 1880s to the 1950s, the Harvey Girls went west to work in Fred Harvey's restaurants along the Santa Fe railway. At a time when there were "no ladies west of Dodge City and no women west of Albuquerque," they came as waitresses, but many stayed and settled, founding the struggling cattle and mining towns that dotted the region. Interviews, historical research, and photographs help re-create the Harvey Girl experience. The accounts are personal, but laced with the history the women lived: the dust bowl, the depression, and anecdotes about some of the many famous people who ate at the restaurants--Teddy Roosevelt, Shirley Temple, Bob Hope, to name a few. The Harvey Girls was awarded the winner of the 1991 New Mexico Press Women's ZIA award.
History

A History of Highway 60

Author: Dixie Boyle

Publisher: Sunstone Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 140

View: 941

In 1903 the AT&SF Railroad began laying track on the Belen Cutoff from Belen, New Mexico to Amarillo, Texas. The railroad company encouraged settlement of New Mexico’s eastern plains by sponsoring emigrant trains, a quicker method of transport for settlers moving their belongings and livestock across the country. Towns were founded along the route with the arrival of the railroad. Billy the Kid was shot and killed by Pat Garrett in Fort Sumner. Taiban’s Pink Pony Saloon & Dancehall publicized cock fighting and had a live snake den in the basement. Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart stopped at Portair Field in Clovis while flying across the country in the 1920s. Did you know Mountainair was the Pinto Bean Capital of the World, Negra has one of the last vintage gas stations in the state, Butch Cassidy and his gang trailed cattle to the railhead in Magdalena, and Montague Stevens was one of the last hunters to stalk grizzly bears? This book will give you answers to these questions as well as a glimpse into the history of this fascinating part of New Mexico, “The Land of Enchantment.”

Railroad Depots & Harvey Houses on the Belen, Nm Cutoff

Author: Dixie Boyle

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 24

View: 321

This is a 24 page pamphlet on the history of Railroad Depots and Harvey Houses on the Belen, New Mexico Cutoff Railroad Route. Most of the depots are gone now and one of the Harvey Houses but the history of the area still remains. There were 28 locations along the route serving as depots, water stops and more. Most of the depots were closed in the 1960s causing a decline in the communities where they were located.
Social Science

A History of Mobility in New Mexico

Author: Lindsay M. Montgomery

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 210

View: 372

A History of Mobility in New Mexico uses the often-enigmatic chipped stone assemblages of the Taos Plateau to chart patterns of historical mobility in northern New Mexico. Drawing on evidence of spatial patterning and geochemical analyses of stone tools across archaeological landscapes, the book examines the distinctive mobile modalities of different human communities, documenting evolving logics of mobility—residential, logistical, pastoral, and settler colonial. In particular, it focuses on the diversity of ways that Indigenous peoples have used and moved across the Plateau landscape from deep time into the present. The analysis of Indigenous movement patterns is grounded in critical Indigenous philosophy, which applies core principles within Indigenous thought to the archaeological record in order to challenge conventional understandings of occupation, use, and abandonment. Providing an Indigenizing approach to archaeological research and new evidence for the long-term use of specific landscape features, A History of Mobility in New Mexico presents an innovative approach to human-environment interaction for readers and scholars of North American history.
History

The Train Stops Here

Author: Marci L. Riskin

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 156

View: 391

In the vast expanse of territorial New Mexico, railroads had a striking impact. Many cities, among them Carlsbad, Raton, Clovis, and Gallup, were founded as railroad stops. Architect Marci Riskin explores the history of railroad depots and other structures--everything but the trains themselves--that make up New Mexico's railway legacy. To begin the examination, Riskin includes a brief history of railroad development in New Mexico, a description of the architectural features of the state's railroad buildings, and an overview of how railroads work. This background will help answer questions that may arise on a visit to a rail-yard: What is that strangely shaped train car carrying? How is that twisted piece of metal used? Why are the bricks on the platform stamped with the single word Coffeyville? The bulk of the book is an account of what is left of the state's railroad heritage, organized geographically within each rail system: the Santa Fe system from Raton to Silver City, the Denver & Rio Grande, the Colorado & Southern, the Southern Pacific, and the El Paso and Northeastern, among others.
Biography & Autobiography

Broken but Fixable in the Potter's Hands

Author: Juanita Funkhouser

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 583

This book, Broken but Fixable in the Potters Hands, have a double purpose. It was written as a tool to help me heal over horrible things that I had to work though and be healed over. Plus this book was written as a testimony of how God help me through these horrible things that I had to deal with day by day. My psychiatric suggested that I would start a journal of my hard times and how I overcome them. My problems that I had to face started back when I was just a little baby on to adult problems.
Biography & Autobiography

Great American Hoteliers

Author: Stanley Turkel

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 388

View: 339

During the thirty years prior to the Civil War, Americans built hotels larger and more ostentatious than any in the rest of the world. These hotels were inextricably intertwined with American culture and customs but were accessible to average citizens. As Jefferson Williamson wrote in "The American Hotel" ( Knopf 1930), hotels were perhaps "the most distinctively American of all our institutions for they were nourished and brought to flower solely in American soil and borrowed practically nothing from abroad". Development of hotels was stimulated by the confluence of travel, tourism and transportation. In 1869, the transcontinental railroad engendered hotels by Henry Flagler, Fred Harvey, George Pullman and Henry Plant. The Lincoln Highway and the Interstate Highway System triggered hotel development by Carl Fisher, Ellsworth Statler, Kemmons Wilson and Howard Johnson. The airplane stimulated Juan Trippe, John Bowman, Conrad Hilton, Ernest Henderson, A.M. Sonnabend and John Hammons.. My research into the lives of these great hoteliers reveals that none of them grew up in the hospitality business but became successful through their intense on-the- job experiences. My investigation has uncovered remarkable and startling true stories about these pioneers, some of whom are well-known and others who are lost in the dustbin of history.
History

A Land Apart

Author: Flannery Burke

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 538

"A new kind of history of the Southwest (mainly New Mexico and Arizona) that foregrounds the stories of Latino and Indigenous peoples who made the Southwest matter to the nation in the twentieth century"--Provided by publisher.