Computers

Knowledge Management for Health Care Procedures

Author: David Riaño

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 166

View: 153

The incursion of information and communication technologies (ICT) in health care entails evident bene?ts at the levels of security and e?ciency that improve not only the quality of life of the patients, but also the quality of the work of the health care professionals and the costs of national health care systems. Leaving research approaches aside, the analysis of ICT in health care shows an evo- tion from the initial interest in representing and storing health care data (i. e. , electronic health care records) to the current interest of having remote access to electronic health care systems, as for example HL7 initiatives or telemedicine. This sometimes imperceptible evolution can be interpreted as a new step of the progress path of health care informatics, whose next emerging milestone is the convergenceof current solutions with formal methods for health care kno- edge management. In this sense, K4CARE is a European project aiming at contributing to this progress path. It is centered on the idea that health care knowledge rep- sented in a formal waymay favor the treatment of home care patients in modern societies. The project highlights several aspects that are considered relevant to the evolution of medical informatics: health care knowledge production, health care knowledge integration, update, and adaptation, and health care intelligent systems.
Medical

Healthcare Knowledge Management

Author: Rajeev Bali

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 282

View: 898

This unique text is a practical guide to managing and developing Healthcare Knowledge Management (KM) that is underpinned by theory and research. It provides readers with an understanding of approaches to the critical nature and use of knowledge by investigating healthcare-based KM systems. Designed to demystify the KM process and demonstrate its applicability, this text offers contemporary and clinically-relevant lessons for future organizational implementations.
Business & Economics

Healthcare Knowledge Management Primer

Author: Nilmini Wickramasinghe

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 851

Quality care of patients requires evaluating large amounts of data at the right time and place and in the correct context. With the advent of electronic health records, data warehouses now provide information at the point of care and facilitate a continuous learning environment in which lessons learned can provide updates to clinical, administrative, and financial processes. Given the advancement of the information tools and techniques of today’s knowledge economy, utilizing these resources are imperative for effective healthcare. Thus, the principles of Knowledge Management (KM) are now essential for quality healthcare management. The Healthcare Knowledge Management Primer explores and explains essential KM principles in healthcare settings in an introductory and easy to understand fashion. This concise book is ideal for both students and professionals who need to learn more about key aspects of the KM field as it pertains to effecting superior healthcare delivery. It provides readers with an understanding of approaches to KM by examining the purpose and nature of its key components and demystifies the KM field by explaining in an accessible manner the key concepts of KM tools, strategies and techniques, and their benefits to contemporary healthcare organizations.
Medical

Pervasive Health Knowledge Management

Author: Rajeev Bali

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 378

View: 875

Pervasive healthcare is an emerging research discipline, focusing on the development and application of pervasive and ubiquitous computing technology for healthcare and wellness. Pervasive healthcare seeks to respond to a variety of pressures on healthcare systems, including the increased incidence of life-style related and chronic diseases, emerging consumerism in healthcare, need for empowering patients and relatives for self-care and management of their health, and need to provide seamless access for healthcare services, independent of time and place. Pervasive healthcare may be defined from two perspectives. First, it is the development and application of pervasive computing (or ubiquitous computing, ambient intelligence) technologies for healthcare, health and wellness management. Second, it seeks to make healthcare available to anyone, anytime, and anywhere by removing locational, time and other restraints while increasing both the coverage and quality of healthcare. This book proposes to define the emerging area of pervasive health and introduce key management principles, most especially knowledge management, its tools, techniques and technologies. In addition, the book takes a socio-technical, patient-centric approach which serves to emphasize the importance of a key triumvirate in healthcare management namely, the focus on people, process and technology. Last but not least the book discusses in detail a specific example of pervasive health, namely the potential use of a wireless technology solution in the monitoring of diabetic patients.
Medical

Perspectives of Knowledge Management in Urban Health

Author: Michael Christopher Gibbons

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 220

View: 282

It is a tragic paradox of American health care: a system renowned for world-class doctors, the latest medical technologies, and miraculous treatments has shocking inadequacies when it comes to the health of the urban poor. Urban Health Knowledge Management outlines bold, workable strategies for addressing this disparity and eliminating the “knowledge islands” that so often disrupt effective service delivery. The book offers a wide-reaching global framework for organizational competence leading to improved care quality and outcomes for traditionally underserved clients in diverse, challenging settings. Its contributors understand the issues fluently, imparting both macro and micro concepts of KM with clear rationales and real-world examples as they: • Analyze key aspects of KM and explains their applicability to urban health. • Introduce the KM tools and technologies most relevant to health care delivery. • Offer evidence of the role of KM in improving clinical efficacy and executive decision-making. • Provide extended case examples of KM-based programs used in Washington, D.C. (child health), South Africa (HIV/AIDS), and Australia (health inequities). • Apply KM principles to urban health needs in developing countries. • Discuss new approaches to managing, evaluating, and improving delivery systems in the book’s “Measures and Metrics” section. Urban health professionals, as well as health care executives and administrators, will find Urban Health Knowledge Management a significant resource for bringing service delivery up to speed at a time of great advancement and change.
Computers

Knowledge Management in Public Health

Author: Jay Liebowitz

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 230

View: 858

Close collaboration across agencies and international borders is mandatory for public health officials. A powerful tool for sharing knowledge, knowledge management (KM) can help public health professionals quickly collaborate and disseminate knowledge for solving public health issues worldwide. The latest initiatives for reforming healthcare have put the spotlight on the need for maximizing resources. In addition to providing a platform for sharing knowledge, KM can help healthcare professionals do more with less. One tool, two problems solved. Yet the sharing of knowledge and KM continues to be a major challenge in the public health field. Knowledge Management in Public Health provides a general introduction to KM and social networking in the public health arena. The book begins with coverage of basic principles, components, and methodologies as well as trends and key issues in public health. It includes ten case studies illustrating applications of KM and social networking in public health. The chapters are written by leading individuals from organizations involved in applying KM in public health worldwide. The editors and chapter authors explore the many elements of KM, delineating how and why to start such an initiative. They provide specific examples of the development and value-added benefits of KM in a variety of public health environments. Tough or quick decision making has always benefitted enormously from knowledge based on the maximum amount of pertinent information available at the time—this has not changed. What is new in the present public health environment is the need to do this more often, with fewer personnel available, and increased expectations relative to the services expected by the public. Better use of information under a KM system is well suited to serve that purpose. This book explores the many ways to use KM to anticipate potential health issues and quickly resolve key incidents when they occur.
Computers

Knowledge Management in Healthcare

Author: Lorri Zipperer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 250

View: 160

Knowledge management goes beyond data and information capture in computerized health records and ordering systems; it seeks to leverage the experiences of all who interact in healthcare to enhance care delivery, teamwork, and organizational learning. Knowledge management - if envisioned thoughtfully - takes a systemic approach to implementation that includes the embodiment of a learning culture. Knowledge is then used to support that culture and the knowledge workers within it to encourage them to share what they know, thusly enabling their peers, their organizations and ultimately their patients to benefit from their experience to proactively dismantle hierarchy and encourage sharing about what works, and what doesn’t to focus efforts on improvement. Knowledge Management in Healthcare draws on relevant business, clinical and health administration literature plus the analysis of discussions with a variety of clinical, administrative, leadership, patient and information experts. The result is a book that will inform thinking on knowledge access needs to mitigate potential failures, design lasting improvements and support the sharing of what is known to enable work towards attaining high reliability. It can be used as a general tool for leaders and individuals wishing to devise and implement a knowledge-sharing culture in their institution, design innovative activities supporting transparency and communication to strengthen existing programs intended to enhance knowledge sharing behaviours and contribute to high quality, safe care.