Literary Criticism

Homer Beside Himself

Author: Maureen Alden

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 398

View: 625

Students reading the Iliad for the first time are often bewildered by the sheer volume of information on apparently unrelated subjects contained in it. The central narrative seems to unfold very slowly, and to be complicated by long speeches containing stories which might be interesting in themselves, but which seem to have no relevance to anything else. In this book Dr Alden offers advice on how to read the Iliad through the relationship of major paradigms to the events of the main narrative. The first section offers the first full-length study in English of the paradigmatic functions of secondary narratives and minor-key episodes in the Iliad. None of these are irrelevant or merely ornamental: rather each is carefully selected and altered if necessary, to reflect on significant episodes of the main narrative and act as guides to its interpretation. The second section offers a general reading of the Iliad arising out of Phoenix's advice to Achilles in Book 9. The allegory of the Prayers illustrates the dire consequences of rejecting prayers, and the paradigm of Meleager presents us with an instance of an angry hero to whom prayers and entreaties are addressed, whilst the primary narrative confines this motif of prayers and entreaties in ascending scale of affection to Achilles and Hector and contrasts their responses. Both heroes suffer terribly for their rejection of entreaties.
Literary Criticism

Reading Homer

Author: Kostas Myrsiades

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 838

These nine new essays on Homer's epics deal not only with major Homeric themes of time (honor), kleos (fame), geras (rewards), the psychology of Homeric warriors, and the re-evaluation of type scenes, but also with Homer's influence on contemporary film. Following the introduction and an essay which sets the historical background for the epics, four essays are devoted to fresh analysis of key passages and themes while another four turn to a discussion of the film Troy and Homer's influence on two other genres of American cinema.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Homeric Voices

Author: Elizabeth Minchin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 310

View: 202

Drawing on the disciplines of sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and cognitive psychology, Elizabeth Minchin studies the speeches that Homer attributes to his characters. She describes how the poet may have used his memory for everyday talk to construct such speeches, and examines how they reflect the speaker's age, status, and gender.
Literary Collections

Homer's Cosmic Fabrication

Author: Bruce Heiden

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 272

View: 126

Although scholars routinely state that the Iliad is an "oral poem," since very near the time of its composition the great epic has circulated as a text stabilized in writing. Thus whether or not it is in some sense "oral poetry," the Iliad undoubtedly has features that render it quite satisfactory to readers and reading. But the question of what these features might be has been difficult for modern Homeric scholarship even to frame, much less address, within the research paradigm of "oral poetics." In Homer's Cosmic Fabrication Bruce Heiden delineates a new approach aimed at evaluating what the Iliad furnishes to readers that makes it comprehensible and engaging. His program conceptualizes the act of reading as a flexible repertoire of cognitive functions that a reader might deploy in collaboration with the poem's signs. By positing certain functions hypothetically and applying them to the poem, Heiden's experiments uncover the kind and degree of suitable "reading material" the poem provides. These analyses reveal that the trajectory of events in the Iliad manifests the central agency of one character, Zeus, and that the transmitted articulation of the epic into chapter-like "books" conforms to distinct narrative subtrajectories. The analyses also show, however, that the fixed sequence of "books" functions suitably as a design that cues attention to the major crises in the story, as well as to themes that develop its significance. The transmitted arrangement therefore furnishes an implicit cognitive map that both eases comprehension of the storyline and indicates previously unexplored pathways of interpretation. Through Homer's Cosmic Fabrication enthusiasts of the Iliad will gain enhanced understanding of the epic's poetic design and the philosophical rewards it offers to thoughtful study.
Literary Criticism

Homer’s Iliad

Author: Martha Krieter-Spiro

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 949

This commentary on the 3rd book of the Iliad concentrates on the interpretation of the ceremonial single combat between the rivals for Helen, Paris and Menelaus, a scene that reflects the origins of the Trojan War. The famous parade before the walls presents Agamemnon, Odysseus and Ajax, and reveals just how much in love Paris and Helen are in spite of internal and external conflicts.
Literary Criticism

Homer’s Iliad

Author: Claude Brügger

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 751

The renowned Basler Homer-Kommentar of the Iliad, edited by Anton Bierl and Joachim Latacz and originally published in German, presents the latest developments in Homeric scholarship. Through the English translation of this ground-breaking reference work, edited by S. Douglas Olson, its valuable findings are now made accessible to students and scholars worldwide.
Literary Criticism

Homer’s Iliad

Author: Marina Coray

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 330

View: 809

The renowned Basler Homer-Kommentar of the Iliad, edited by Anton Bierl and Joachim Latacz and originally published in German, presents the latest developments in Homeric scholarship. Through the English translation of this ground-breaking reference work, edited by S. Douglas Olson, its valuable findings are now made accessible to students and scholars worldwide.
Literary Criticism

A Referential Commentary and Lexicon to Homer, Iliad VIII

Author: Adrian Kelly

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 528

View: 573

This book aims to provide the reader of Homer with the traditional knowledge and fluency in Homeric poetry which an original ancient audience would have brought to a performance of this type of narrative. To that end, Adrian Kelly presents the text of Iliad VIII next to an apparatus referring to the traditional units being employed, and gives a brief description of their semantic impact. He describes the referential curve of the narrative in a continuous commentary, tabulates all the traditional units in a separate lexicon of Homeric structure, and examines critical decisions concerning the text in a discussion which employs the referential method as a critical criterion. Two small appendices deal with speech introduction formulae, and with the traditional function of Here and Athene in early Greek epic poetry.
History

Homer: Iliad Book XVIII

Author: Homer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 766

Presents an edition of this outstanding book containing a clear and readable introduction, concise notes on the text and strong literary appreciation.
History

Homer: Iliad

Author: Homer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 897

Book XXII recounts the climax of the Iliad: the fatal encounter between the main defender of Troy and the greatest warrior of the Greeks, which results in the death of Hector and Achilles' revenge for the death of his friend Patroclus. At the same time it adumbrates Achilles' own death and the fall of Troy. This edition will help students and scholars better appreciate this key part of the epic poem. The introduction summarises central debates in Homeric scholarship, such as the circumstances of composition and the literary interpretation of an oral poem, and offers synoptic discussions of the structure of the Iliad, the role of the narrator, similes and epithets. There is a separate section on language, which provides a compact list of the most frequent Homeric characteristics. The commentary offers up-to-date linguistic guidance, and elucidates narrative techniques, typical elements and central themes.