How Cities Work

Author: Lonely Planet Publications Staff

Publisher: Lonely Planet Kids

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 24

View: 982

From the sewers to the skyscrapers, this brilliant book takes younger readers to the heart of the city. Perforated flaps let you see what's going on behind closed doors, and big gatefolds reveal what's going on under the street you walk on each day, along with other unusual city spaces. Illustrated by James Gulliver Hancock and with surprises on every page, it's the city like you've never seen it before.
Political Science

How Cities Work

Author: Alex Marshall

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 346

Do cities work anymore? How did they get to be such sprawling conglomerations of lookalike subdivisions, megafreeways, and "big box" superstores surrounded by acres of parking lots? And why, most of all, don't they feel like real communities? These are the questions that Alex Marshall tackles in this hard-hitting, highly readable look at what makes cities work. Marshall argues that urban life has broken down because of our basic ignorance of the real forces that shape cities-transportation systems, industry and business, and political decision making. He explores how these forces have built four very different urban environments-the decentralized sprawl of California's Silicon Valley, the crowded streets of New York City's Jackson Heights neighborhood, the controlled growth of Portland, Oregon, and the stage-set facades of Disney's planned community, Celebration, Florida. To build better cities, Marshall asserts, we must understand and intelligently direct the forces that shape them. Without prescribing any one solution, he defines the key issues facing all concerned citizens who are trying to control urban sprawl and build real communities. His timely book will be important reading for a wide public and professional audience.
Political Science

How Cities Work

Author: Barrie Needham

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 198

View: 235

How Cities Work: An Introduction discusses how cities work and compares methods used in understanding the cities. Organized into five parts, this book begins by elucidating the interactions between city and its region, as well as between people and facilities. Subsequent part explains how the interactions of activities, people, and buildings cause activities to cluster into functional areas and how functional areas interact with each other. The effect of public policies on cities and an economic viewpoint on how cities work are also described. This book will be valuable to citizens and planners of the cities.
Social Science

How Cities Work

Author: Preston Gralla

Publisher: Ziff Davis Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 130

View: 376

Describes how cities function from the technological point of view, including utilities, ecological issues, construction, and transportation
Architecture

Cities as Sustainable Ecosystems

Author: Peter Newman

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 296

View: 294

Modern city dwellers are largely detached from the environmental effects of their daily lives. The sources of the water they drink, the food they eat, and the energy they consume are all but invisible, often coming from other continents, and their waste ends up in places beyond their city boundaries. Cities as Sustainable Ecosystems shows how cities and their residents can begin to reintegrate into their bioregional environment, and how cities themselves can be planned with nature’s organizing principles in mind. Taking cues from living systems for sustainability strategies, Newman and Jennings reassess urban design by exploring flows of energy, materials, and information, along with the interactions between human and non-human parts of the system. Drawing on examples from all corners of the world, the authors explore natural patterns and processes that cities can emulate in order to move toward sustainability. Some cities have adopted simple strategies such as harvesting rainwater, greening roofs, and producing renewable energy. Others have created biodiversity parks for endangered species, community gardens that support a connection to their foodshed, and pedestrian-friendly spaces that encourage walking and cycling. A powerful model for urban redevelopment, Cities as Sustainable Ecosystems describes aspects of urban ecosystems from the visioning process to achieving economic security to fostering a sense of place.
History

How Cities Won the West

Author: Carl Abbott

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 486

The author traces the evolution of early frontier towns at the beginning of Western expansion to the thriving urban centers they have become today.
Computers

World City Network

Author: Peter J. Taylor

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 241

View: 114

Peter Taylor's compelling insights challenge us to view cities as part of a global network, divorced from the constraints of national or even regional boundaries.
Architecture

Beyond Smart Cities

Author: Tim Campbell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 731

The promise of competitiveness and economic growth in so-called smart cities is widely advertised in Europe and the US. The promise is focussed on global talent and knowledge economies and not on learning and innovation. But to really achieve smart cities – that is to create the conditions of continuous learning and innovation – this book argues that there is a need to understand what is below the surface and to examine the mechanisms which affect the way cities learn and then connect together. This book draws on quantitative and qualitative data with concrete case studies to show how networks already operating in cities are used to foster and strengthen connections in order to achieve breakthroughs in learning and innovation. Going beyond smart cities means understanding how cities construct, convert and manipulate relationships that grow in urban environments. Cities discussed in this book – Amman, Barcelona, Bilbao, Charlotte,Curitiba, Juarez, Portland, Seattle and Turin – illuminate a blind spot in the literature. Each of these cities has achieved important transformations, and learning has played a key role, one that has been largely ignored in academic circles and practice concerning competitiveness and innovation.
Social Science

The Connected City

Author: Zachary P. Neal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 711

The Connected City explores how thinking about networks helps make sense of modern cities: what they are, how they work, and where they are headed. Cities and urban life can be examined as networks, and these urban networks can be examined at many different levels. The book focuses on three levels of urban networks: micro, meso, and macro. These levels build upon one another, and require distinctive analytical approaches that make it possible to consider different types of questions. At one extreme, micro-urban networks focus on the networks that exist within cities, like the social relationships among neighbors that generate a sense of community and belonging. At the opposite extreme, macro-urban networks focus on networks between cities, like the web of nonstop airline flights that make face-to-face business meetings possible. This book contains three major sections organized by the level of analysis and scale of network. Throughout these sections, when a new methodological concept is introduced, a separate ‘method note’ provides a brief and accessible introduction to the practical issues of using networks in research. What makes this book unique is that it synthesizes the insights and tools of the multiple scales of urban networks, and integrates the theory and method of network analysis.
Social Science

Cities Are Good for You

Author: Leo Hollis

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 889

The 21st century will be the age of the city. Already over 50% of the world population live in urban centres and over the coming decades this percentage will increase. Blending anecdote, fact and first hand encounters - from exploring the slums of Mumbai, to visiting roof-top farms in Brooklyn and attending secret dinner parties in Paris, to riding the bus in Latin America - Leo Hollis reveals that we have misunderstood how cities work for too long. Upending long-held assumptions and challenging accepted wisdom, he explores: why cities can never be rational, organised places; how we can walk in a crowd without bumping into people, and if we can design places that make people want to kiss; whether we have the right solution to the problem of the slums; how ants, slime mould and traffic jams can make us rethink congestion. And above all, the unexpected reasons why living in the city can make us fitter, richer, smarter, greener, more creative - and, perhaps, even happier. Cities Are Good for You introduces dreamers, planners, revolutionaries, writers, scientists, architects, slum-dwellers and emperors. It is shaped by the idea that cities are the greatest social experiment in human history, built for people, and by the people.