Mathematics

How to Lie with Statistics

Author: Darrell Huff

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 144

View: 247

Over Half a Million Copies Sold--an Honest-to-Goodness Bestseller Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way the results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to full rather than to inform.

How to Lie With Statistics

Author: Jordan Conner

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 24

View: 758

Discover a Simple Guide on How to Lie with Statistics You're about to discover a proven strategy on what to do when you need to lie. When most of us were kids, we often hear out parents tell us not to lie (at least to them). During your childhood and teenage years, you would most likely get punished when you were caught lying. But as you grow older, you realize that lying is essential. In fact, it is an essential skill. Here Is A Preview Of What You'll Learn... Why Do People Lie? Lying With Statistics Common lies in statistics Are you willing to lie? How to lie for a better cause Much, much more! Purchase your copy today!

Statistics for Beginners

Author: Bob Mather

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 156

View: 703

Big Brother is watching you. Discover how statistics can be used to control our society. Have you ever wondered what your neighbor does every morning at 8:35 am, when you hear weird sounds coming from his balcony? Did you ever realize that the "likes" you put on other people ́s Instagram account will influence the next summer collection of Zara, H&M and Nike? Are you aware that whenever you swipe your credit card in the supermarket, you are not only paying with money, but you are giving valuable personal data away for free? The science of collecting, analyzing and interpreting data became a powerful tool to get useful information about humans and their environment. Personal data has more value than ever and yet you leave terabytes of it for free on your devices or floating around in your cloud. Not only do Google and Facebook harvest billions from using your data for advertising, but talented hackers have also created a luxurious living from stealing and selling your data. In our high tech world, decision making is based on evidence instead of assumptions. By now our entire world is build around reliable statistics. ...ehm HOLD ON. Reliable? If I tell you baldness raises the cardiovascular disease risk up to 70%, it is a true fact. What I forgot to mention is baldness and old age are related. So what is the cause of cardiovascular diseases? Baldness or old age? Statistics can be misleading and manipulating. Yet there are incredible examples of how statistics helped to solve crimes and find a serial killer. In "Statistics for Beginners", you ́ll discover: How statistics replaced religion and what happened to god What will happen when robots will take the world leadership and how close we are to a gigantic robot invasion How statistics can save or destroy the world with simple tricks scientists use to present their so called "proven evidence" How statistics helped an old lady to get her stolen purse back What the customer sees is not even close to the truth and why How fishing crews and emancipation are connected Why being a voluntary prisoner in Stanford Prison revolutionized the history of statistics How to create a future vision and bring Star Wars into real life and much more... Discover the power of statistics and how they change your daily life. You should know how to interpret the numbers, facts and studies you consume to be ahead of everyone else and become an insider instead of an innocent victim. If you want to know who is watching you and why then Scroll up and click the "add to cart" button.
Science

How to Lie with Maps

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 222

View: 947

Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must. The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of national interest and cultural values in national mapping organizations, including the United States Geological Survey, while the other explores the new breed of multimedia, computer-based maps. To show how maps distort, Monmonier introduces basic principles of mapmaking, gives entertaining examples of the misuse of maps in situations from zoning disputes to census reports, and covers all the typical kinds of distortions from deliberate oversimplifications to the misleading use of color. "Professor Monmonier himself knows how to gain our attention; it is not in fact the lies in maps but their truth, if always approximate and incomplete, that he wants us to admire and use, even to draw for ourselves on the facile screen. His is an artful and funny book, which like any good map, packs plenty in little space."—Scientific American "A useful guide to a subject most people probably take too much for granted. It shows how map makers translate abstract data into eye-catching cartograms, as they are called. It combats cartographic illiteracy. It fights cartophobia. It may even teach you to find your way. For that alone, it seems worthwhile."—Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times ". . . witty examination of how and why maps lie. [The book] conveys an important message about how statistics of any kind can be manipulated. But it also communicates much of the challenge, aesthetic appeal, and sheer fun of maps. Even those who hated geography in grammar school might well find a new enthusiasm for the subject after reading Monmonier's lively and surprising book."—Wilson Library Bulletin "A reading of this book will leave you much better defended against cheap atlases, shoddy journalism, unscrupulous advertisers, predatory special-interest groups, and others who may use or abuse maps at your expense."—John Van Pelt, Christian Science Monitor "Monmonier meets his goal admirably. . . . [His] book should be put on every map user's 'must read' list. It is informative and readable . . . a big step forward in helping us to understand how maps can mislead their readers."—Jeffrey S. Murray, Canadian Geographic
Technology & Engineering

How to Lie with Maps, Third Edition

Author: Mark Monmonier

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 256

View: 468

An instant classic when first published in 1991, How to Lie with Maps revealed how the choices mapmakers make—consciously or unconsciously—mean that every map inevitably presents only one of many possible stories about the places it depicts. The principles Mark Monmonier outlined back then remain true today, despite significant technological changes in the making and use of maps. The introduction and spread of digital maps and mapping software, however, have added new wrinkles to the ever-evolving landscape of modern mapmaking. ​Fully updated for the digital age, this new edition of How to Lie with Maps examines the myriad ways that technology offers new opportunities for cartographic mischief, deception, and propaganda. While retaining the same brevity, range, and humor as its predecessors, this third edition includes significant updates throughout as well as new chapters on image maps, prohibitive cartography, and online maps. It also includes an expanded section of color images and an updated list of sources for further reading.
Mathematics

Statistics in a Nutshell

Author: Sarah Boslaugh

Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 594

View: 858

Need to learn statistics for your job? Want help passing a statistics course? Statistics in a Nutshell is a clear and concise introduction and reference for anyone new to the subject. Thoroughly revised and expanded, this edition helps you gain a solid understanding of statistics without the numbing complexity of many college texts. Each chapter presents easy-to-follow descriptions, along with graphics, formulas, solved examples, and hands-on exercises. If you want to perform common statistical analyses and learn a wide range of techniques without getting in over your head, this is your book. Learn basic concepts of measurement and probability theory, data management, and research design Discover basic statistical procedures, including correlation, the t-test, the chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests, and techniques for analyzing nonparametric data Learn advanced techniques based on the general linear model, including ANOVA, ANCOVA, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression Use and interpret statistics for business and quality improvement, medical and public health, and education and psychology Communicate with statistics and critique statistical information presented by others
Mathematics

Probability, Statistics, and Queueing Theory

Author: Arnold O. Allen

Publisher: Gulf Professional Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 740

View: 622

This is a textbook on applied probability and statistics with computer science applications for students at the upper undergraduate level. It may also be used as a self study book for the practicing computer science professional. The successful first edition of this book proved extremely useful to students who need to use probability, statistics and queueing theory to solve problems in other fields, such as engineering, physics, operations research, and management science. The book has also been successfully used for courses in queueing theory for operations research students. This second edition includes a new chapter on regression as well as more than twice as many exercises at the end of each chapter. While the emphasis is the same as in the first edition, this new book makes more extensive use of available personal computer software, such as Minitab and Mathematica.
Mathematics

Teaching Statistics

Author: Andrew Gelman

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 320

View: 758

Students in the sciences, economics, psychology, social sciences, and medicine take introductory statistics. Statistics is increasingly offered at the high school level as well. However, statistics can be notoriously difficult to teach as it is seen by many students as difficult and boring, if not irrelevant to their subject of choice. To help dispel these misconceptions, Gelman and Nolan have put together this fascinating and thought-provoking book. Based on years of teaching experience the book provides a wealth of demonstrations, examples and projects that involve active student participation. Part I of the book presents a large selection of activities for introductory statistics courses and combines chapters such as, 'First week of class', with exercises to break the ice and get students talking; then 'Descriptive statistics' , collecting and displaying data; then follows the traditional topics - linear regression, data collection, probability and inference. Part II gives tips on what does and what doesn't work in class: how to set up effective demonstrations and examples, how to encourage students to participate in class and work effectively in group projects. A sample course plan is provided. Part III presents material for more advanced courses on topics such as decision theory, Bayesian statistics and sampling.
Social Science

Damned Lies and Statistics

Author: Joel Best

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 167

Here, by popular demand, is the updated edition to Joel Best's classic guide to understanding how numbers can confuse us. In his new afterword, Best uses examples from recent policy debates to reflect on the challenges to improving statistical literacy. Since its publication ten years ago, Damned Lies and Statistics has emerged as the go-to handbook for spotting bad statistics and learning to think critically about these influential numbers.