In Moorish Captivity

Author: Henry M. Grey

Publisher: Nabu Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 422

View: 592

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.
History

Christians and Moors in Spain. 2. 1195 - 1614

Author: Colin Smith

Publisher: Classical Texts

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 426

The two previous volumes draw a fascinating picture of the confrontation between the Christians and Moors in Spain from the Christian side. This volume attempts to redress the balance by describing many of the same incidents from the Muslims' point of view.
Performing Arts

Ruptures in the Western Empire

Author: Omar Moumni

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 150

View: 396

First encounters between the east and the west in the Mediterranean are important instances in history. They are the source of constructing a myth and history that has depended much on literary and cultural productions. This book investigates this history by dwelling on issues of white female captives in Moorish Thralldom and their representation in western cinema to realize the way the stories of those Christian female captives have been used and abused by their nations to achieve imperialist ambitions. This book dwells on the ambivalent attitudes of those female captives towards their empires and problematizes the “strength” and “unity” of the colonial discourse. Cinema of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries reflects the paradigm that western directors and producers followed. It is the construction of visual narratives they inherited from orientalism, as well as the creation of visual tropes that are often created through polarities of good and bad, and through the process of intertexuality. Western cinema encapsulates the “other” in the stereotypical framework of cinematic production. It fixes the “other” with its misrepresentation and, with the repetition of those stereotypes, it contributes to widening the gap between the two entities – the west as opposed to the east. This book analyzes all those visual texts: movies as a battleground for opposing ideologies; as a space where we are pushed far away from the precinct of literature into the arena of politics and ideology; an arena where political, ideological and cultural struggles are enmeshed to vanquish the weak “other”. Omar Moumni reads all those western cinematic productions as colonial texts. He reads them from the perspective and the position of the Moorish “other” whose voice has been drawn to represent a history. By rereading this visual culture, he deconstructs the stereotypes, the tropes and the constructed reality about the “other”, and gives the “other” his due and his voice, uttered in the other’s disruptive resistance.
History

Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery

Author: Nabil Matar

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 379

During the early modern period, hundreds of Turks and Moors traded in English and Welsh ports, dazzled English society with exotic cuisine and Arabian horses, and worked small jobs in London, while the "Barbary Corsairs" raided coastal towns and, if captured, lingered in Plymouth jails or stood trial in Southampton courtrooms. In turn, Britons fought in Muslim armies, traded and settled in Moroccan or Tunisian harbor towns, joined the international community of pirates in Mediterranean and Atlantic outposts, served in Algerian households and ships, and endured captivity from Salee to Alexandria and from Fez to Mocha. In Turks, Moors, and Englishmen, Nabil Matar vividly presents new data about Anglo-Islamic social and historical interactions. Rather than looking exclusively at literary works, which tended to present unidimensional stereotypes of Muslims—Shakespeare's "superstitious Moor" or Goffe's "raging Turke," to name only two—Matar delves into hitherto unexamined English prison depositions, captives' memoirs, government documents, and Arabic chronicles and histories. The result is a significant alternative to the prevailing discourse on Islam, which nearly always centers around ethnocentrism and attempts at dominance over the non-Western world, and an astonishing revelation about the realities of exchange and familiarity between England and Muslim society in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods. Concurrent with England's engagement and "discovery" of the Muslims was the "discovery" of the American Indians. In an original analysis, Matar shows how Hakluyt and Purchas taught their readers not only about America but about the Muslim dominions, too; how there were more reasons for Britons to venture eastward than westward; and how, in the period under study, more Englishmen lived in North Africa than in North America. Although Matar notes the sharp political and colonial differences between the English encounter with the Muslims and their encounter with the Indians, he shows how Elizabethan and Stuart writers articulated Muslim in terms of Indian, and Indian in terms of Muslim. By superimposing the sexual constructions of the Indians onto the Muslims, and by applying to them the ideology of holy war which had legitimated the destruction of the Indians, English writers prepared the groundwork for orientalism and for the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century conquest of Mediterranean Islam. Matar's detailed research provides a new direction in the study of England's geographic imagination. It also illuminates the subtleties and interchangeability of stereotype, racism, and demonization that must be taken into account in any responsible depiction of English history.
Biography & Autobiography

White Slaves, African Masters

Author: Paul Baepler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 310

View: 529

IntroductionCotton Mather: The Glory of GoodnessJohn D. Foss: A Journal, of the Captivity and Sufferings of John FossJames Leander Cathcart: The Captives, Eleven Years in AlgiersMaria Martin: History of the Captivity and Sufferings of Mrs. Maria MartinJonathan Cowdery: American Captives in TripoliWilliam Ray: Horrors of SlaveryRobert Adams: The Narrative of Robert AdamsEliza Bradley: An Authentic NarrativeIon H. Perdicaris: In Raissuli's HandsAppendix: Publishing History of the American Barbary Captive Narrative Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.
History

Pirate Utopias

Author: Peter Lamborn Wilson

Publisher: Autonomedia

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 988

'Peter Lamborn Wilson shows why we cherish pirates - and why, for the sake of the future, we must continue to do so. Interesting and compelling...a rollicking, adventurous book.'Marcus Rediker, author, Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea'A chronicler, a historiographer, and a piratologist in the tradition of Defoe...with immense learning and interesting sympathies. His scholarship cuts through the seas of ignorance and prejudice with grace and power.'Peter Linebaugh, author, The London Hanged'One of those rare books which give historians new ideas to think about. It deals with 17th century European converts to Islam - usually but not always as pirates - whose numbers Wilson puts at thousands. His careful analysis of (the) renegadoes, their ideas, and political practice leads to a very tentative suggestion that some of them may have links with Rosicrucianism and the 18th-century Enlightenment...Historians will have to think about this book's novel theme and pursue its implications. Wilson really does turn the world upside down!'Christopher Hill, author, The World Turned Upside DownFrom the 16th to the 19th centuries, Muslim corsairs from the Barbary Coast ravaged European shipping and enslaved thousands of unlucky captives. During this same period, thousands more Europeans converted to Islam and joined the pirate holy war. Were these men (and women) the scum of the seas, apostates, traitors -- Renegadoes? Or did they abandon and betray Christendom as a praxis of social resistance?Peter Lamborn Wilson focuses on the corsairs' most impressive accomplishment, the independent Pirate Republic of Salé, in Morocco, in the 17th century. Corsairs, Sufis, pederasts, "irresistible" Moorish women, slaves, adventures, Irish rebels, heretical Jews, British spies, a Moorish pirate in old New York, and radical working-class heroes all populate a book which intends to entertain and to make a point about insurrectionary communities.
History

Moorish Spain

Author: Richard Fletcher

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 189

View: 702

A good introductory picture of the Islamic presence in Spain, from the year 711 until the modern era.
Literary Collections

Christians and Moors in Spain. Vol 2 Latin documents and vernacular documents AD 1195-1614

Author: Colin Smith

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 201

View: 863

The two previous volumes draw a fascinating picture of the confrontation between the Christians and Moors in Spain from the Christian side. This volume attempts to redress the balance by describing many of the same incidents from the Muslims' point of view.

Proceedings

Author: Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 357

Social Science

Aztecs, Moors, and Christians

Author: Max Harris

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 319

View: 799

In villages and towns across Spain and its former New World colonies, local performers stage mock battles between Spanish Christians and Moors or Aztecs that range from brief sword dances to massive street theatre lasting several days. The festival tradition officially celebrates the triumph of Spanish Catholicism over its enemies, yet this does not explain its persistence for more than five hundred years nor its widespread diffusion. In this insightful book, Max Harris seeks to understand Mexicans' "puzzling and enduring passion" for festivals of moros y cristianos. He begins by tracing the performances' roots in medieval Spain and showing how they came to be superimposed on the mock battles that had been a part of pre-contact Aztec calendar rituals. Then using James Scott's distinction between "public" and "hidden transcripts," he reveals how, in the hands of folk and indigenous performers, these spectacles of conquest became prophecies of the eventual reconquest of Mexico by the defeated Aztec peoples. Even today, as lively descriptions of current festivals make plain, they remain a remarkably sophisticated vehicle for the communal expression of dissent.
History

Moorish Spain

Author: Richard Fletcher

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 778

Written in the same tradition as John Julius Norwich's engrossing accounts of Venice and Byzantium, Richard Fletcher's Moorish Spain entertains even as it enlightens. He tells the story of a vital period in Spanish history which transformed the culture and society, not only of Spain, but of the rest of Europe as well. Moorish influence transformed the architecture, art, literature and learning, and Fletcher combines this analysis with a crisp account of the wars, politics and sociological changes of the time.
History

Piracy, Slavery, and Redemption

Author: Daniel J. Vitkus

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 216

At last available in a modern, annotated edition, these tales describe combat at sea, extraordinary escapes, and religious conversion, but they also illustrate the power, prosperity, and piety of Muslims in the early modern Mediterranean.
History

White Women Captives in North Africa

Author: K. Bekkaoui

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 954

A fascinating anthology of narratives from the period 1735-1830, by European women who recount their enslavement in North Africa. The first such collection, it includes an extensive introduction which links the discourse on contemporary Western women captives in Iran, Afghanistan and Iraq with that of former white captives in North Africa.