Business & Economics

In the Shadow of Detroit

Author: David Roberts

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 326

View: 693

An automotive history title that fills a gap in common understanding of the early automobile industry in the Windsor-Detroit international region.
Science

Intergenerational Space

Author: Robert Vanderbeck

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 366

View: 137

Intergenerational Space offers insight into the transforming relationships between younger and older members of contemporary societies. The chapter selection brings together scholars from around the world in order to address pressing questions both about the nature of contemporary generational divisions as well as the complex ways in which members of different generations are (and can be) involved in each other’s lives. These questions include: how do particular kinds of spaces and spatial arrangements (e.g. cities, neighbourhoods, institutions, leisure sites) facilitate and limit intergenerational contact and encounters? What processes and spaces influence the intergenerational negotiation and contestation of values, beliefs, and social memory, producing patterns of both continuity and change? And if generational separation and segregation are in fact significant social problems across a range of contexts—as a significant body of research and commentary attests—how can this be ameliorated? The chapters in this collection make original contributions to these debates drawing on original research from Belgium, China, Finland, Poland, Senegal, Singapore, Tanzania, Uganda, the United States and the United Kingdom. .
History

Italians in Detroit

Author: Armando Delicato

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 872

People of Italian descent have been present in Detroit since Alfonso Tonti, second-in-command to Antoine Cadillac, participated in the founding of the city in 1701. By the close of the 19th century, the trickle of Italian immigrants had become a torrent, as thousands rushed to the growing industrial center. Settling on the lower east side, the community grew rapidly, especially north and east into Macomb County. Italians in Detroit did not remain in a "little Italy," but mingled with the diverse population of the city. Through a combination of hard work and strong family and community ties, the Italians of Detroit have achieved their dreams of a better life. They have met the challenges of living in a new land while nurturing the culture of the old country. The challenge that remains is to nurture a love of heritage among young Italian Americans as the immigrant generation fades.
History

Arab Detroit

Author: Nabeel Abraham

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 630

View: 375

Metropolitan Detroit is home to one of the largest, most diverse Arab communities outside the Middle East, yet the complex world Arabic-speaking immigrants have created there is barely visible on the landscape of ethnic America. In this volume, Nabeel Abraham and Andrew Shryock bring together the work of twenty-five contributors to create a richly detailed portrait of Arab Detroit. The book goes behind the bulletproof glass in Iraqi Chaldean liquor stores. It explores the role of women in a Sunni mosque and the place of nationalist politics in a Coptic church. It follows the careers of wedding singers, Arabic calligraphers,restaurant owners, and pastry chefs. It examines the agendas of Shia Muslim activists and Washington-based lobbyists and looks at the intimate politics of marriage, family honor, and adolescent rebellion. Memoirs and poems by Lebanese, Chaldean, Yemeni, and Palestinian writers anchor the book in personal experience, while over fifty photographs provide a backdrop of vivid, often unexpected, images. In their efforts to represent an ethnic/immigrant community that is flourishing on the margins of pluralist discourse, the contributors to this book break new ground in the study of identity politics, transnationalism, and diaspora cultures.
History

Detroit's Mexicantown

Author: María Elena Rodríguez

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 408

Mexican immigrants began to settle in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th century. They were attracted by the jobs available in the automobile industry and the rest of the rapidly expanding industrial base. ... offers a glimpse into when and where the community started--P. [4] of cover.
Photography

Detroit's Corktown

Author: Armando Delicato

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 872

Detroit’s Corktown celebrates the history of Detroit’s oldest neighborhood. From Irish immigrants in the 1840s to urban pioneers of the 21st century, this community has beckoned to the restless of spirit, the adventurous, and those who have sought to escape poverty and oppression to make a new life in America. While the city of Detroit has undergone tremendous change over the years, Corktown has never forgotten the solid working-class roots established by brave pioneers in the mid-19th century. Many of their shotgun homes are still occupied, and many commercial buildings have served the community for decades. Today the neighborhood is the scene of increasing residential and commercial development and has attracted attention throughout the region. No longer exclusively Irish, the community has also been important historically to the large German, Maltese, and Mexican populations of Detroit. Today it is a diverse and proud community of African Americans, Hispanics, working-class people of various national origins, and a growing population of young urban pioneers. It is still the sentimental heart of the Irish American community of metropolitan Detroit, and the Irish Plaza on Sixth Street honors the city’s Irish pioneers and their 600,000 descendents living in the region.
History

Detroit's Polonia

Author: Cecile Wendt Jensen

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 170

More than a century has passed since the first Poles settled in Detroit. The first communities were established on the east side of Detroit, but the colony expanded rapidly to the west neighborhoods, and Poles in Detroit still identify themselves as East- or Westsiders. The pioneers left Poland for freedom of language and religion, and to own property. They replicated village life in the big city, living in close-knit neighborhoods anchored by the parish church. Polish immigrants made cigars, built railroad cars, molded stoves, established businesses and breweries, and moved into the political arena. The struggles and triumphs of these early settlers are on display in the pages of Detroit Polonia, a photographic history that links future generations with their Polish heritage.
Business & Economics

Life in the Shadows of the Crystal Palace, 1910-1927

Author: Clarence Hooker

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 210

View: 820

Hooker (American thought and language, Michigan State U.) examines the transformation of a sleepy village, Highland Park, Michigan into an industrial boomtown that later became an urban ghetto. He describes how Ford's first large factory created the first American city dependent on the automobile industry, and how the company tried to control the lives of workers and residents. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Automobile industry and trade

Making Cars in Canada

Author: Richard White

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Automobile industry and trade

Page: 104

View: 994

"Automobile manufacturing began in Canada in the early years of the twentieth century, a few years after it began in the United States. This is no coincidence, for the first Canadian automobile manufacturers started business as partners of newly established U.S. companies, assembling and selling their partners' cars in Canada"--Abstract, p. v.