Jews

Jewish Antiquities

Author: Josephus

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Jews

Page: 824

View: 661

Josephus, soldier, statesman, historian, was a Jew born at Jerusalem about 37 CE. A man of high descent, he early became learned in Jewish law and Greek literature and was a Pharisee. After pleading in Rome the cause of some Jewish priests he returned to Jerusalem and in 66 tried to prevent revolt against Rome, managing for the Jews the affairs of Galilee. In the troubles which followed he made his peace with Vespasian. Present at the siege of Jerusalem by Titus, he received favours from these two as emperors and from Domitian and assumed their family name Flavius. He died after 97. As a historical source Josephus is invaluable. His major works are: History of the Jewish War, in seven books, from 170 BCE to his own time, first written in Aramaic but translated by himself into the Greek we now have; and Jewish Antiquities, in twenty books, from the creation of the world to 66 CE. The Loeb Classical Library edition of the works of Josephus also includes the autobiographical Life and his treatise Against Apion.

Josephus (Volume V) Jewish Antiquities, Books V-VIII

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 836

View: 708

This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature. This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published. Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true nature.
Religion

Many Convincing Proofs

Author: Stephen S. Liggins

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 333

View: 879

While there have been various studies examining the contents of the evangelistic proclamation in Acts; and various studies examining, from one angle or another, individual persuasive phenomena described in Acts (e.g., the use of the Jewish Scriptures); no individual studies have sought to identify the key persuasive phenomena presented by Luke in this book, or to analyse their impact upon the book’s early audiences. This study identifies four key phenomena – the Jewish Scriptures, witnessed supernatural events, the Christian community and Greco-Roman cultural interaction. By employing a textual analysis of Acts that takes into account both narrative and socio-historical contexts, the impact of these phenomena upon the early audiences of Acts – that is, those people who heard or read the narrative in the first decades after its completion – is determined. The investigation offers some unique and nuanced insights into evangelistic proclamation in Acts; persuasion in Acts, persuasion in the ancient world; each of the persuasive phenomena discussed; evangelistic mission in the early Christian church; and the growth of the early Christian church.
Language Arts & Disciplines

The Archaeology of Israelite Samaria. Volume 2: The Eighth Century BCE

Author: Ron E. Tappy

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 700

View: 929

In this study, Tappy completes the study of the Iron Age strata at Samaria that began with the first volume of this work. Tappy's goal is to provide a thorough-going analysis of prior archaeologists' work at this important north Israelite site
Religion

The Things that Make for Peace

Author: Jesse Nickel

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 815

This study offers fresh insight into the place of (non)violence within Jesus' ministry, by examining it in the context of the eschatologically-motivated revolutionary violence of Second Temple Judaism. The book first explores the connection between violence and eschatology in key literary and historical sources from Second Temple Judaism. The heart of the study then focuses on demonstrating the thematic centrality of Jesus’ opposition to such “eschatological violence” within the Synoptic presentations of his ministry, arguing that a proper understanding of eschatology and violence together enables appreciation of the full significance of Jesus’ consistent disassociation of revolutionary violence from his words and deeds. The book thus articulates an understanding of Jesus’ nonviolence that is firmly rooted in the historical context of Second Temple Judaism, presenting a challenge to the "seditious Jesus hypothesis"—the claim that the historical Jesus was sympathetic to revolutionary ideals. Jesus’ rejection of violence ought to be understood as an integral component of his eschatological vision, embodying and enacting his understanding of (i) how God’s kingdom would come, and (ii) what would identify those who belonged to it.
Religion

The Rome of Peter and Paul

Author: Brian Schmisek

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 194

View: 490

This handbook is a short guide for those who are interested in Roman sites that have something to do with the New Testament, and in particular with Peter and Paul. For more than ten years, Dr. Schmisek has led graduate ministry programs in the Eternal City. This book is informed by the questions, insights, and comments from students over those years. While not addressing each and every claimed New Testament artifact in the city of Rome, the handbook focuses on the more significant churches and locales that have a connection to Petrine and Pauline legends: places such as St. Peter's at the Vatican and St. Paul's outside the Walls are included, but also St. Peter's at Montorio and Tre Fontane. There are two primary parts to this book: the first is a brief survey of what is known (and not known) regarding Peter and Paul's time in Rome. The various sources of Pauline and Petrine legends are included in this survey as those legends are key to interpreting many sites and their significance. The second part of the book is more akin to a tour book laid out in four subsections, generally corresponding to geographical areas of the city. This brief handbook will be a valuable guide to those who seek a greater understanding of the historical and legendary background to Petrine and Pauline sites in Rome.
Jews

The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 8

Author: Todd M. Endelman

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Jews

Page: 1384

View: 462

The eighth volume in a landmark series, this anthology of Jewish culture and civilization encompasses the period between the world wars An anthology of Jewish culture between the world wars, the editors' selections convey the variety, breadth, and depth of Jewish creativity in those tempestuous decades. Despite--or perhaps because of--external threats, Jews fought vigorously over religion, politics, migration, and their own relation to the state and to one another. The texts, translated from many languages, span a wide range of politics, culture, literature, and art. This collection examines what was simultaneously a tense and innovative period in modern Jewish history.
Religion

Documents and Images for the Study of Paul

Author: Neil Elliott

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 418

View: 267

Documents and Images for the Study of Paul gathers representative texts illustrating Jewish practices, Greco-Roman moral exhortation, biblical interpretation, Roman ideology, apocalyptic visions, epistolary conventions, and much more, to illustrate the complex cultural environment in which Paul carried out his apostolic work and the manifold ways in which his legacy was reshaped in early Christianity. Brief, insightful introductions orient the reader to how these sources might play a role in different contemporary interpretations of Paul's life and thought. Lavishly illustrated with more than one hundred black and white photographs, charts, a map and timeline of Paul's world, this sourcebook is a welcome resource for courses on Paul and his letters.
Religion

The Acts of the Apostles Through the Centuries

Author: Heidi J. Hornik

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 368

View: 967

Charting the theological and cultural potency of Acts across the timespan of Christian history, this work of profound scholarship reveals the full extent of the New Testament book’s religious, artistic, literary, and political influence. Reveals the influence of Acts at key turning points in the history of the Christian church Traces the rich and varied artistic and cultural heritage rooted in Acts, from music to literature Analyzes the political significance of the book as a touchstone in the church’s external relations Provides detailed commentary on the exegesis of Acts down the centuries
Religion

Resurrection as Salvation

Author: Thomas D. McGlothlin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 847

This book is the first study to focus on the reception of Paul's link between resurrection and salvation, revealing its profound effect on Early Christian theology - not only eschatology, but also anthropology, pneumatology, ethics, and soteriology. Thomas D. McGlothlin traces the roots of the deep tension on the matter in ancient Judaism and then offers deep readings of the topic by key theologians of pre-Nicene Christianity, who argued on both sides of the issue of the fleshliness of the resurrected body. McGlothlin unravels the surprising continuities that emerge between Irenaeus, Origen, and the Valentinians, as well as deep disagreements between allies like Irenaeus and Tertullian.
Performing Arts

Humanism, Drama, and Performance

Author: Hana Worthen

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 301

View: 771

This book examines the appropriation of theatre and theatrical performance by ideologies of humanism, in terms that continue to echo across the related disciplines of literary, drama, theatre, and performance history and studies today. From Aristotle onward, theatre has been regulated by three strains of critical poiesis: the literary, segregating theatre and the practices of the spectacular from the humanizing work attributed to the book and to the internality of reading; the dramatic, approving the address of theatrical performance only to the extent that it instrumentalizes literary value; and the theatrical, assimilating performance to the conjunction of literary and liberal values. These values have been used to figure not only the work of theatre, but also the propriety of the audience as a figure for its socializing work, along a privileged dualism from the aestheticized ensemble—harmonizing actor, character, and spectator to the essentialized drama—to the politicized assembly, theatre understood as an agonistic gathering.
Nature

Power, Ethics, and Ecology in Jewish Late Antiquity

Author: Julia Watts Belser

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 247

View: 881

This book analyzes rabbinic responses to drought and disaster, revealing how talmudic tales of charismatic holy men grapple with problems of power, ethics, and ecology in Jewish late antiquity. Aimed at scholars and students of rabbinic literature, it will also appeal to scholars of early Christianity and religion and the environment.
Religion

Josephus, the Emperors, and the City of Rome

Author: William den Hollander

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 424

View: 780

In Josephus, the Emperors, and the City of Rome William den Hollander explores the social circumstances in which Josephus spent the years of his life following his first encounter with Rome, considering particularly his place within the Roman army camp and, later, the imperial capital.
Religion

Judges

Author: Trent C. Butler

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 636

View: 295

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship. Overview of Commentary Organization Introduction—covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology. Each section of the commentary includes: Pericope Bibliography—a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope. Translation—the author’s own translation of the biblical text, reflecting the end result of exegesis and attending to Hebrew and Greek idiomatic usage of words, phrases, and tenses, yet in reasonably good English. Notes—the author’s notes to the translation that address any textual variants, grammatical forms, syntactical constructions, basic meanings of words, and problems of translation. Form/Structure/Setting—a discussion of redaction, genre, sources, and tradition as they concern the origin of the pericope, its canonical form, and its relation to the biblical and extra-biblical contexts in order to illuminate the structure and character of the pericope. Rhetorical or compositional features important to understanding the passage are also introduced here. Comment—verse-by-verse interpretation of the text and dialogue with other interpreters, engaging with current opinion and scholarly research. Explanation—brings together all the results of the discussion in previous sections to expose the meaning and intention of the text at several levels: (1) within the context of the book itself; (2) its meaning in the OT or NT; (3) its place in the entire canon; (4) theological relevance to broader OT or NT issues. General Bibliography—occurring at the end of each volume, this extensive bibliography contains all sources used anywhere in the commentary.
Nature

The Songs of Trees

Author: David George Haskell

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 304

View: 950

WINNER OF THE 2018 JOHN BURROUGHS MEDAL FOR OUTSTANDING NATURAL HISTORY WRITING “Both a love song to trees, an exploration of their biology, and a wonderfully philosophical analysis of their role they play in human history and in modern culture.” —Science Friday The author of Sounds Wild and Broken and the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Forest Unseen visits with nature’s most magnificent networkers — trees David Haskell has won acclaim for eloquent writing and deep engagement with the natural world. Now, he brings his powers of observation to the biological networks that surround all species, including humans. Haskell repeatedly visits a dozen trees, exploring connections with people, microbes, fungi, and other plants and animals. He takes us to trees in cities (from Manhattan to Jerusalem), forests (Amazonian, North American, and boreal) and areas on the front lines of environmental change (eroding coastlines, burned mountainsides, and war zones.) In each place he shows how human history, ecology, and well-being are intimately intertwined with the lives of trees. Scientific, lyrical, and contemplative, Haskell reveals the biological connections that underpin all life. In a world beset by barriers, he reminds us that life’s substance and beauty emerge from relationship and interdependence.
History

From Jerusalem Priest to Roman Jew

Author: Michael Tuval

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 345

View: 865

In this study, Michael Tuval examines the religion of Flavius Josephus diachronically. The author suggests that because Diaspora Jews could not participate regularly in the cultic life of the Jerusalem Temple, they developed other paradigms of Judaic religiosity. He interprets Josephus as a Jew who began his career as a Judean priest but moved to Rome and gradually became a Diaspora intellectual. Josephus' first work, Judean War, reflects a Judean priestly view of Judaism, with the Temple and cult at the center. After these disappeared, there was not much hope left in the religious realm. Tuval also analyzes Antiquities of the Jews, which was written fifteen years later. Here the religious picture has been transformed drastically. The Temple has been marginalized or replaced by the law which is universal and perfect for all humanity.