Fiction

Jonathan Wild

Author: Henry Fielding

Publisher: Catedra Ediciones

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 344

View: 585

Cuando Henry Fielding publica «Jonathan Wild» en 1743, el autor era ya uno de los hombres de letras más reconocidos, admirados, odiados y polémicos de su tiempo, a pesar de que su carrera como novelista había comenzado tan sólo dos años antes. La posterior publicación de «Tom Jones», su obra maestra, consolidó a Fielding como uno de los grandes autores de prosa de ficción de su época, convirtiéndole en uno de los padres de la novela inglesa del XVIII y de la novela realista europea. El Fielding vividor y optimista que escribió en sus novelas cantos llenos de perspicacia e inteligencia a la alegría de vivir, con una franqueza sexual tachada frecuentemente de inmoral, muestra en «Jonathan Wild» su vena más cínica, pesimista e irónica sobre la naturaleza humana. Su mensaje final resuena, desgraciadamente, lleno de vigente actualidad: la satisfacción de ser " grande " no emana de los resultados materiales de dicha grandeza, sino del mero orgullo de saberse superior o distinto a los demás.
Criminals

Jonathan Wild

Author: Henry Fielding

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Criminals

Page: 286

View: 736

Literary Criticism

Fieldings Jonathan Wild

Author: Janna Falkenstein

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 26

View: 247

Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2006 im Fachbereich Anglistik - Literatur, Note: 2,3, Freie Universität Berlin (Englische Philologie), 11 Quellen im Literaturverzeichnis, Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: Gegenstand dieser Arbeit ist Henry Fieldings Erzählung Jonathan Wild. Die Erzählung erschien erstmalig 1743 in Fieldings Sammlung Miscellanies und basiert zum einen auf dem Leben des berüchtigten Diebes und thief-takers Jonathan Wild und zum anderen auf fiktiven Elementen. Die Anzahl von Fielding hinzu gedichteter Begebenheiten und Charaktere ist so groß, dass man nicht mehr von einer Biographie von Jonathan Wild sprechen kann. Sein Leben und der schlechte Ruf, der ihm vorauseilte, dienen lediglich als Grundgerüst für eine bissige Erzählung, die sich die Verbrecher seiner Zeit vornimmt. Viele Kritiker sind der Meinung, dass Jonathan Wild in erster Linie eine politische Satire auf den damaligen Premierminister Englands Robert Walpole ist. Dies ist auch nicht von der Hand zu weisen. Die Moralvorstellungen die Fielding zu vermitteln versucht sind außerdem durchaus aktuell und können auch für „große Männer“ unserer Zeit gelten. Des Weiteren ist Fieldings Version von Jonathan Wilds Lebensgeschichte eine satirisch-ironische Darstellung der damaligen Londoner Gesellschaft. Vom kleinen Dieb über die untreue Ehefrau bis zum großen Politiker bekommt jeder sein Fett weg. Fielding rechnet geschickt und mit unnachahmlicher Ironie mit jedem Lügner und Betrüger ab. Trotz aller Übertreibungen zeichnet er dabei ein Bild der Gesellschaft, das der damaligen Realität recht nahe kommt. Diese Arbeit gliedert sich in vier Teile. Zunächst wird das Leben des wahren Jonathan Wild beschrieben, um eine Vorstellung davon zu vermitteln, auf welcher Grundlage Fieldings Werk entstand. Danach folgt ein Kapitel über Henry Fielding, seine Vorstellungen von Moral und welche Bedeutung diese für sein Werk haben. Danach wird die Geschichte des fiktiven Jonathan Wild umrissen und verglichen, inwieweit sich Fielding an das Original hielt, bzw. seiner Fantasie freien Lauf ließ. Anschließend wird auf den wichtigsten Schauplatz in Jonathan Wild, das Newgate Gefängnis, eingegangen. Im Laufe der Arbeit soll außerdem dargestellt werden, wie sich Fieldings Roman in das Bild der Londoner Gesellschaft des 18. Jahrhunderts einfügt. [...]
History

Thief-Taker General

Author: Gerald Howson

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 338

View: 594

The historical literature of political deviance is sparse. This unusual work, chronicling the history of Jonathan Wild, represents an effort to come to terms with one of the more amazing characters of English social history. Wild was both part of the policy system in eighteenth-century England, and also one of the most adroit criminals of the age. In the 1720s, London suffered the worst crime waves in its history. Civic corruption took place on a staggering scale. The government's answer was to pay a bounty for the capture of robbers, thus creating a class of professional informers. Wild was applauded as the most efficient thief hunter and gang breaker in British society; but his own posse of thief catchers was basically a front behind which he was able to control the underground world, through a complex system of blackmail, perjury, and terror which the book details. All who opposed him were betrayed to the law, and in the struggle for power Wild sacrificed several hundred of his own people to the hangman. No one since his time, with the exception of Lavrenti Beria of the late Stalin era GPU so nearly succeeded in bringing the underworld under the control of one system of power. At one level, this is a biography of the world's first supercriminal. At another, it is a sociology of criminal behavior and its political consequences. Howson sheds fresh light, not only on a figure who has become famous in literature, but more important, on the entire structure of gang life. The book is written "as a "terrifying and fascinating study of a historical epoch; it also offers a completely fresh picture of the birth of modern organized-crime families as part of modern organized political systems.
Characters and characteristics in literature

Cyclopedia of Literary Characters: Jonathan Wild-Peder Victorious

Author: A. J. Sobczak

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Characters and characteristics in literature

Page: 497

View: 412

Contains analyses of characters that appear in novels, plays, epics, and other classics of world literature, providing lengthy descriptions of central characters, and less extensive discussions of supporting players; and arranged alphabetically by title.
Fiction

Jonathan Wild the Great

Author: Henry Fielding

Publisher: Hesperus Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 189

View: 836

A hilarious black comedy of manners and morals, based on the crimes and career of a real-life 18th-century gangland criminal, Jonathan Wild the Great is one of the finest satires in the English language. Jonathan Wild is truly “great”—spurning the callow and spiritless ways of “lower” men, he walks his own path to fame and glory, by way of theft, fraud, and betrayal. Against a backdrop of such colorful characters as the whore Miss Molly Straddle, the cardsharp Count La Ruse, and the base and weak Mr. Thomas Heartfree, Wild’s passage from cradle to gallows is recounted with a humor that belies the subtlety of the novel’s ironic themes. Novelist and dramatist Henry Fielding is best known for his light-hearted novels and satires. His masterpiece, Tom Jones, is acknowledged as one of the finest novels in the English language.
Fiction

Jonathan Wild

Author: Henry Fielding

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 279

View: 997

A fictionalized biography of an infamous English criminal satirizes the quest for greatness
History

Thief-Taker Hangings

Author: Aaron Skirboll

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 559

After the Glorious Revolution, a not so glorious age of lawlessness befell England. Crime ran rampant, and highwaymen, thieves, and prostitutes ruled the land. Execution by hanging often punished the smallest infractions, and rip-roaring stories of fearless criminals proliferated, giving birth to a new medium: the newspaper. In 1724, housebreaker Jack Sheppard—a “pocket Hercules,” his small frame packed with muscle—finally met the hangman. Street singers sang ballads about the Cockney burglar because no prison could hold him. Each more astonishing than the last, his final jailbreak took him through six successive locked rooms, after which he shimmied down two blankets from the prison roof to the street below. Just before Sheppard swung, he gave an account of his life to a writer in the crowd. Daniel Defoe stood in the shadow of the day’s literati—Swift, Pope, Gay—and had done hard time himself for sedition and bankruptcy. He saw how prison corrupted the poor. They came out thieves, but he came out a journalist. Six months later, the author of Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders covered another death at the hanging tree. Jonathan Wild looked every bit the brute—body covered in scars from dagger, sword, and gun, bald head patched with silver plates from a fractured skull—and he had all but invented the double-cross. He cultivated young thieves, profited from their work, then turned them in for his reward—and their execution. But one man refused to play his game. Sheppard didn’t take orders from this self-proclaimed “thief-taker general,” nor would he hawk his loot through Wild’s fences. The two-faced bounty hunter took it personally and helped bring the young burglar’s life to an end. But when Wild’s charade came to light, he quickly became the most despised man in the land. When he was hanged for his own crimes, the mob wasn’t rooting for Wild as it had for Sheppard. Instead, they hurled stones, rotten food, and even dead animals at him. Defoe once again got the scoop, and tabloid journalism as we know it had begun.