Health & Fitness

Joseph Smith and Herbal Medicine

Author: John Heinerman

Publisher: Cedar Fort

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 170

View: 533

In Joseph Smith and Herbal Medicine, the companion book to Joseph Smith and Natural Foods, Dr. John Heinerman delves into the merits of using herbs and natural medicines as he explores the benefits of following the Mormon health code, the Word of Wisdom.
Sports & Recreation

Spitting in the Soup

Author: Mark Johnson

Publisher: VeloPress

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 589

Doping is as old as organized sports. From baseball to horse racing, cycling to track and field, drugs have been used to enhance performance for 150 years. For much of that time, doping to do better was expected. It was doping to throw a game that stirred outrage. Today, though, athletes are vilified for using performance-enhancing drugs. Damned as moral deviants who shred the fair-play fabric, dopers are an affront to the athletes who don’t take shortcuts. But this tidy view swindles sports fans. While we may want the world sorted into villains and victims, putting the blame on athletes alone ignores decades of history in which teams, coaches, governments, the media, scientists, sponsors, sports federations, and even spectators have played a role. The truth about doping in sports is messy and shocking because it holds a mirror to our own reluctance to spit in the soup—that is, to tell the truth about the spectacle we crave. In Spitting in the Soup, sports journalist Mark Johnson explores how the deals made behind closed doors keep drugs in sports. Johnson unwinds the doping culture from the early days, when pills meant progress, and uncovers the complex relationships that underlie elite sports culture—the essence of which is not to play fair but to push the boundaries of human performance. It’s easy to assume that drugs in sports have always been frowned upon, but that’s not true. Drugs in sports are old. It’s banning drugs in sports that is new. Spitting in the Soup offers a bitingly honest, clear-eyed look at why that’s so, and what it will take to kick pills out of the locker room once and for all.
Health & Fitness

Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads

Author: Frank Hoffmann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 258

View: 480

Find all the information you need on herbs and spices in one place! Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads is an A-to-Z reference book written in a straightforward style that’s informative enough for library use but informal enough for general reading. This essential guide takes a practical look at the popular uses of herbs and spices, presented in an easy-to-use format. The book is a refreshing alternative to the how-to guides, cookbooks, and picture books usually found on the subject. From alfalfa to ginseng to yellow dock, more than 100 entries are included, featuring historical backgrounds, popular and practical uses, folklore, and bibliographies. Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads also contains related listings and essays that range from alternative medicine to food preparation and nutrition to herbs in wedding celebrations. Detailed enough for reference use by academics, the book has a natural tone that appeals to garden club members, herb and spice experts, hobbyists, and others. Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads also includes information on: herb growing and marketing herbs and spices in literature medicinal herbs and spices federal regulations on herbs and spices horticulture therapy An everyday guide for enthusiasts and a perfect place to start for newcomers, Herbal Medicine and Botanical Medical Fads is an easy-to-use handbook with wide-ranging appeal. It combines the comprehensive information you’d expect from a reference book with a casual and colorful look at the histories and backgrounds of herbs and spices, both commonplace and exotic. As a vital resource or an occasional reference, this book is unique in its scope and invaluable in its usefulness.
History

Life in a Corner

Author: Robert S. McPherson

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 399

Community building in the Four Corners area of southeastern Utah required specialized knowledge and a good bit of determination on the part of settlers who wrested a livelihood from the Colorado Plateau. Robert S. McPherson, the region’s leading historian, draws on oral history and personal archives to write about cowboys and homesteaders, loggers and sawmill operators, law enforcement officers and bootleggers, miners and midwives, trappers and builders. In Life in a Corner, he shapes their stories into a fascinating mosaic of cultural and environmental history unique to this region. McPherson demonstrates that, above all, settlers worked hard in order to succeed in this often forbidding land. A first-person account of erecting a Latter-day Saint tabernacle tells of volunteers using only what was under their feet or came from a nearby mountain. Other chapters give an insider’s perspective on cowboying in canyon country, bringing law and order to a virtually lawless land, waging war against wolves and coyotes, and homesteading on some of the last large desert tracts in the continental United States. But the most gripping stories center on the ingenuity of those who lived these personal experiences. Only a veteran trapper would think of burying an alarm clock to attract a coyote. Only a determined bootlegger would devise a saddle made of leather-covered copper equipped with a spigot to dispense moonshine by the cup. Only committed, or desperate, miners would sail with a one-way “ticket” to a gold field in a hidden desert chasm. What were midwives being taught at the turn of the century, and how did their practice involve equal parts religious doctrine and medical procedure? What was a qualifying examination like for the first forest rangers? And how did small close-knit communities handle “slackers” during World War I? Life in a Corner answers these and many other questions while offering fresh perspectives on past events and current controversies.
Biography & Autobiography

Mormon Enigma

Author: Linda King Newell

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 394

View: 920

Winner of the Evans Biography Award, the Mormon History Association Best Book Award, and the John Whitmer Association (RLDS) Best Book Award. A preface to this first paperback edition of the biography of Emma Hale Smith, Joseph Smith's wife, reviews the history of the book and its reception. Various editorial changes effected in this edition are also discussed."--back cover.
Mormon Church

Dialogue

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Mormon Church

Page:

View: 410

History

Expulson from Jackson County

Author: John Hammond

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 542

View: 242

AN INACCESSIBLE MORMON ZION:EXPULSION FROM JACKSON COUNTY This is Volume IV of an epic, multi-volume work entitled The Quest for the New Jerusalem: A Mormon Generation Saga, which combines family, Mormon, and American history, focusing upon how the author's ancestors were affected by their conversion to the Mormon religion. In Volume I, four of the author's ancestral families the Carters, Hammonds, Knowltons, and Spencer's and the ancestors of Mormon Church founders Joseph Smith and Brigham Young are followed from the time they enter the Massachusetts Bay Colony in New England in the 1600s down to the early 1800s. Toward the end of Volume I, the focus is upon Joseph Smith and his family, including their move from Vermont to western New York and their religious and occult "magic worldviews." Volume II takes up the narrative at about the year 1820, and involves a detailed, comprehensive, and critical look at the events in the life of Joseph Smith, Jr., during the decade in which he purportedly was visited by numerous heavenly messengers, received the "golden plates," translated the writing on the plates to produce the Book of Mormon, received priesthood authority from other heavenly messengers, published the Book of Mormon, and organized the Mormon Church. There is a detailed examination of the contentious debate concerning the authenticity of the Book of Mormon and the validity of Smith's 1820s visionary experiences. The later chapters describe the movement of Church headquarters from western New York to northeastern Ohio in early 1831, Smith's interest in western Missouri as the site for his New Jerusalem/Zion, and the conversion of the author's direct ancestor Simeon Daggett Carter. Volume III roughly covers Mormon history for the years 1831-33, and describes the influence of Sidney Rigdon and many other Ohio Campbellites (Disciples of Christ Church members) on the early Mormon Church. Numerous Joseph Smith revelations designate Jackson County, Missouri, as the New Jerusalem/Zion, the place where the Second Coming of Christ will soon take place. However, Smith chooses to live instead in Kirtland, Ohio, and serious disagreements and tensions develop between Smith in Ohio and Missouri Mormon leaders. Smith begins construction of a temple in Kirtland, and angry Missourians rise up in the summer of 1833 and violently expel the Mormons from Jackson County. They are given temporary sanctuary mainly in Clay County, located across the Missouri River to the north. Volume IV describes the expulsion of Mormons from Jackson County, the efforts of Missouri state officials to deal with the explosive situation, and Smith's attempt to explain why his Missouri Zion is now off-limits to Mormons, although the Lord purportedly has designated it as the site for the hallowed New Jerusalem and imminent Second Coming of Christ. Smith recruits a Mormon army ("Zion's Camp") and leads it from Ohio to western Missouri in an unsuccessful effort to forcefully "redeem Zion," and fourteen members of the camp die of cholera at the end of the trek, including one of the author's Carter ancestors. There are serious recriminations against Smith within the Mormon Church on account of the total failure of this military venture, and a member of the Kirtland High Council Sylvester Smith brings formal charges against him. In the "trial," however, the accuser quickly becomes the accused, and to avoid excommunication Sylvester is forced to apologize profusely for his "false accusations" against "The Prophet." A disgruntled, excommunicated Mormon--Doctor Philastus Hurlbut--travels to western New York in late 1833 and collects numerous affidavits from residents of the Palmyra/Manchester area alleging that the young Joseph Smith, his father, and some of his brothers engaged in illegal, occult, "treasure-seer," "treasurer-digging" activities during the 1820s, and were lazy and dishonest. Many of these affidavits are published by Pain
Biography & Autobiography

Mormon Healer and Folk Poet

Author: Margaret K. Brady

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 222

View: 636

Mary Susannah Sumner Fackrell Fowler, 1862-1920, lived in the village of Orderville, Utah, which was named for the Mormon communitarian system practiced there. She married Henry Ammon Fowler in 1880 and moved in 1888 to Huntington, Utah. They had eight children, and Henry took a second wife, becoming a polygamist. Mary was not well known outside her community, but she led a remarkable life of selfless service. Folklorist Margaret Brady, intrigued by a photograph and part of a diary, set out to piece together who Mary Fowler was, using fragmentary materials, including Mary's diary, poetry, and essays; her husband's journals; a grandson's biography of her; records of organizations in which she was active; and oral narratives passed down through descendants. The life Brady reconstructed was shaped by shared values concerning community and by Mary's conviction of the importance of social interconnections. Mary's work as a nurse, healer, and midwife, grounded in traditional medicinal practices, extended her reach widely among her neighbors. She was an active leader in LDS Church and other organizations for women. Her folk poetry, written in culturally accepted forms, allowed her to examine, critique, and celebrate the values of her community. Brady brings to this reconstruction an eclectic, interdisciplinary approach. Drawing on reflexive ethnography, Brady emphasizes her own involvement with her subject and with the multiple discourses that, in combination, give her access to Mary Fowler's identity. She encourages her readers to collaborate in piecing together the meaning of Mary's life, reading her autobiographical texts and others in juxtaposition with Brady's understanding of that life; participating in the construction of Mary Fowler's "self" through her poetry, life writings, and community service, and thereby experiencing the interconnectedness she so prized.
Bibliography

Bookseller

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bibliography

Page:

View: 998

Vols. for 1871-76, 1913-14 include an extra number, The Christmas bookseller, separately paged and not included in the consecutive numbering of the regular series.