Reference

Chase's Calendar of Events 2019

Author: Editors of Chase's

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 752

View: 999

Since 1957, Chase's Calendar of Events lists everything worth knowing and celebrating for each day of the year: 12,500 holidays, historical milestones, famous birthdays, festivals, sporting events and much more. "The Oxford English Dictionary of holidays."--NPR's Planet Money.
Reference

Chase's Calendar of Events 2020

Author: Editors of Chase's

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 752

View: 170

Since 1957, Chase's Calendar of Events lists everything worth knowing and celebrating for each day of the year: 12,500 holidays, historical milestones, famous birthdays, festivals, sporting events and much more. "The Oxford English Dictionary of holidays." NPR's Planet Money.
History

Rethinking Oral History and Tradition

Author: Nepia Mahuika

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 516

Indigenous peoples have our own ways of defining oral history. For many, oral sources are shaped and disseminated in multiple forms that are more culturally textured than just standard interview recordings. For others, indigenous oral histories are not merely fanciful or puerile myths or traditions, but are viable and valid historical accounts that are crucial to native identities and the relationships between individual and collective narratives. This book challenges popular definitions of oral history that have displaced and confined indigenous oral accounts as merely oral tradition. It stands alongside other marginalized community voices that highlight the importance of feminist, Black, and gay oral history perspectives, and is the first text dedicated to a specific indigenous articulation of the field. Drawing on a Maori indigenous case study set in Aotearoa New Zealand, this book advocates a rethinking of the discipline, encouraging a broader conception of the way we do oral history, how we might define its form, and how its politics might move beyond a subsuming democratization to include nuanced decolonial possibilities.
Fiction

Break the Bodies, Haunt the Bones

Author: Micah Dean Hicks

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 673

“[T]his novel is extraordinary . . . It is Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, mixed with H. G. Wells’s The Island of Doctor Moreau, set in the creepiest screwed-up town since ’Salem’s Lot . . . [A] major achievement.” — Adam-Troy Castro, Sci Fi magazine Swine Hill was full of the dead. Their ghosts were thickest near the abandoned downtown, where so many of the town’s hopes had died generation by generation. They lingered in the places that mattered to them, and people avoided those streets, locked those doors, stopped going into those rooms . . . They could hurt you. Worse, they could change you. Jane is haunted. Since she was a child, she has carried a ghost girl that feeds on the secrets and fears of everyone around her, whispering to Jane what they are thinking and feeling, even when she doesn’t want to know. Henry, Jane’s brother, is ridden by a genius ghost that forces him to build strange and dangerous machines. Their mother is possessed by a lonely spirit that burns anyone she touches. In Swine Hill, a place of defeat and depletion, there are more dead than living. When new arrivals begin scoring precious jobs at the last factory in town, both the living and the dead are furious. This insult on the end of a long economic decline sparks a conflagration. Buffeted by rage on all sides, Jane must find a way to save her haunted family and escape the town before it kills them.